Position Type
Faculty
Service
- Present
Biography

Dr. Bikmen joined the Department of Psychology in 2007. She holds a Ph.D. in Social/Personality Psychology from City University of New York, an undergraduate degree and a master's degree in Psychology from Bogazici University in her native Istanbul, Turkey. Bikmen conducts research on social identities, representations of group history, and intergroup contact. Her recent research examined how constructions of group history can serve as both resources and obstacles for group members' acts and attitudes (e.g., intellectual performance, and willingness for intergroup contact) in the present. She teaches courses in introductory psychology, research methods, social psychology, psychology of diversity and advanced seminars on psychology of power relations and psychology of eating and cooking.

Degree(s)
B.A., M.A., Bogazici University; Ph.D., Graduate Center, City University of New York

Works

Publications

Bikmen, N. (2015). Still a nation of immigrants? Effects of constructions of immigration history on attitudes toward immigrants. Analysis of Social Issues and Public Policy.

Bikmen, N. (2015). History as a resource: Effects of narrative constructions of group history on intellectual performance. Journal of Social Issues, 71, 309-323.

Bikmen, N. & Durkin, K. (2014). Equality for all? White Americans’ willingness to address inequality with African and Asian Americans. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 20, 591-600.

Bikmen, N. (2014). Diversity. In T. Teo (ed.), Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology. New York: Springer.

Bikmen, N., & Sunar, D. G. (2013). Difficult dialogs: Majority group members’ willingness to talk about inequality with different minority groups. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 37, 467-476.

Bikmen, N. (2013). Collective memory as identity content after violent conflict. Peace & Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 19, 23-33.

Wiley, S., & Bikmen, N. (2012). Building solidarity across difference: Social identity, intersectionality and collective action for social change. In S. Wiley, T. A. Revenson, & G. Philogène (eds), Social categories in everyday experience. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Bikmen, N. (2011). Asymmetrical effects of contact between minority groups: Asian and Black students in a small college. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 17, 186-194.

Deaux, K. & Bikmen, N. (2010). Immigration and Power. In A. Guinote & T. Vescio (eds.). The Social Psychology of Power. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Zaal, M. & Bikmen, N. (2009). Muslim American youth. In C. S. Clauss-Ehlers (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cross-Cultural School Psychology. New York, NY: Springer.

Şirin, S., Bikmen, N., Mir, M., Fine, M., & Zaal, M. (2008). Exploring dual identification among Muslim American emerging adults: A mixed methods study. Journal of Adolescence, 31, 259-279.

Deaux, K., Bikmen, N., Gilkes, A., Ventuneac, A., Joseph, Y., & Payne, Y., Steele, C. (2007). Becoming American: Stereotype threat effects in Afro-Caribbean immigrant groups. Social Psychology Quarterly, 70, 384-404.

Deaux, K., Reid, A., Martin, D., & Bikmen, N. (2006). Diversity or hierarchy? Predicting collective action in groups varying in ethnic and immigrant status. Political Psychology. 27 (1), 123-146.

Bikmen, N. & Sunar, D. G. (2004). Representing the ethnic “Other”: Stereotypes of ethnic groups in Turkey. In N. Kuran-Burcoglu & S. G. Miller (Eds.), Representations of the “Other/s” in the Mediterranean world and their impact on the region. Istanbul: The Isis Press, pp. 201-216.

Presentations

Bikmen, N. & Torrence, M. A. (2015). Effects of learning about the history of women in science on gender identity and quantitative performance. Poster presented at the annual meeting of Association for Psychological Science, New York, NY, USA, May 21-24.

Bikmen, N. & Krumholtz, V. (2015). Gender identity (dis)continuity: Effects on quantitative performance. Poster presented at the annual meeting of Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, USA, April 30 – May 2.

Bikmen, N. (2015). Gender identity (dis)continuity: Effects on quantitative efficacy. Poster presented in the 16th annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Long Beach, California, USA, February 26-28.

Bikmen, N., Lockett, B., & Mezgebu, K. (2013). History as a resource: Effects of narrative constructions of group history on intellectual performance. Poster presented at the 14th annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, New Orleans, USA, January 17-19.

Bikmen, N., & Durkin, K. (2012). Talking about power: White Americans’ willingness to address inequality with Asian Americans and African Americans. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, USA, May 3 - 5.

Bikmen, N. & Sunar, D. G. (2011). Difficult dialogues: Turkish students’ willingness to talk about inequality with Kurds and Armenians. Paper presented at the 34th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Istanbul, Turkey, 9-12 July.

Bikmen, N. (2010). What’s in an apology? Representations of history by Turkish supporters and opponents for a collective apology to Armenians. Paper presented at the 10th International Conference on Social Representations. Tunis, Tunisia, July 5-8.

Wiley, S., Bikmen, N., & Sirin, S. (2010). Ignorant majorities, malicious authorities: Muslim Americans’ strategic accounts of discrimination. Paper presented at the 33rd Annual Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, San Francisco, USA, 12-16 July.

Bikmen, N., & Stephens, M. H. (2010). Water under the bridge? Effects of reminding members of ingroup’s negative past behavior on intergroup attitudes and group identity. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, USA, April 28-May 1.

Bikmen, N. & Huffstead, R. R. (2009). Contact between minorities: Black and Asian students in a Midwestern College. Poster presented at the 32nd Annual Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Dublin, Ireland, 13-17 July.