Faculty & Staff

Olivia Aguilar dr. Aguilar, Olivia Marie Aguilar

Dr.Aguilar, Olivia Marie Aguilar
Faculty  |  Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
101
740-587-5707
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., M.A., Texas A&M; Ph.D., Cornell University
Biography: 

My research interests include environmental education and education for sustainable development (particularly with under-represented groups), environmental attitudes and behavior, environmental justice, multi-cultural education, theories of learning, and science education reform. I received my PhD in Natural Resources at Cornell University in 2009 studying environmental and science education. I obtained my BS and MS in Horticulture from Texas A&M where I studied the effects of a Junior Master Gardener Program on the environmental attitudes of children. I teach ENVS 101: People and the Environment, ENVS 102: Science and the Environment, ENVS 301: Junior Practicum, ENVS 280: Approaches to Environmental Education, and FYS 102: Science and the Community.

"If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin" - Charles Darwin

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Monica Ayala-Martinez dr. Ayala-Martinez, Monica M. Ayala-Martinez

Monica Ayala-Martinez
Faculty  |  Modern Languages, Portuguese, Spanish, Environmental Studies, Latin American & Caribbean Studies
Associate Professor
Fellows Hall
301K
740-587-6228
Service: 
1997-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University Pontificia Bolivariana; B.A., University de Antioquia; M.A., West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Miami
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David Bernstein Bernstein, David Bernstein

David Bernstein
Faculty  |  History, Environmental Studies
Visiting Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
409
740-587-8695
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Bowdoin College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
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Michael C. Brady dr. Brady, Michael C. C. Brady

Michael C. Brady
Faculty  |  Political Science, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Lugar Program in Politics and Public Service
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
305D
740-587-6502
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University
Biography: 

Michael joined the political science department at Denison in the fall of 2009.  His dissertation focuses on the role of parties and partisanship in conference committee negotiations between the House and Senate.  More broadly, his research and teaching centers around the study of political institutions, campaigns and elections, and political parties in the United States.  

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Sally Bulford Bulford, Sally F. Bulford

Faculty  |  English, Environmental Studies, First-Year Program
Visiting Instructor
Barney-Davis Hall
319
740-587-5797
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Wittenberg University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
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John E. Cort dr. Cort, John Edward E. Cort

John E. Cort
Faculty  |  Religion, East Asian Studies, Environmental Studies, International Studies
Professor of Asian and Comparative Religions & Chair (Religion)
Blair Knapp Hall
310A
740-587-6254
Service: 
1992-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University
Biography: 

John E. Cort has degrees in South Asian Studies from the University of Wisconsin (B.A., 1974; M.A., 1982), and in the Study of Religion from Harvard University (A.M., 1984; Ph.D., 1989). He teaches our courses on religions of Asia, as well as comparative courses on issues such as environmentalism, art, human rights and nonviolence. He is also on the East Asian Studies, Environmental Studies and International Studies program committees, and regularly teaches courses that cross-list in these programs.

John is a scholar of India, where he has lived for seven years over the past four decades. Before entering graduate school, he worked as a community organizer on issues of disarmament and social justice in Washington, D.C. He also enjoys translating poetry from several Indian languages into American English.

Research: 

John’s research focuses on the Jain traditions of South Asia, and religion, society, culture and history more broadly in western India, in particular Gujarat and Rajasthan. He has conducted extensive fieldwork in India. He is currently working on two book on Jain devotional texts and practices, with working titles of Naked Devotion and Devotion to the Dispassionate Lord. His research has been supported by grants from the American Institute of Indian Studies, the American Philosophical Society, the Asian Cultural Council, Denison University, the Freeman Foundation, Fulbright-Hays, the Getty Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

He is very active in service to the profession. He is an elected member of the American Society for the Study of Religion. He has served as the Secretary of the Board of Directors of the American Institute of Indian Studies since 1998, and as a member of the Board of Trustees of the American Council on Southern Asian Art twice, in 2000 to 2003, and 2010 to 2014. He served as co-chair of the Steering Committee of the Religion in South Asia Section of the American Academy of Religion in 2008-11, and has served as co-chair of the Jain Studies Group of AAR since 2011.

He has written, edited and translated the following books and special journal issues:

  • (Co-editor, with Andrea Luithle-Hardenberg and Leslie C. Orr), Cooperation and Competition, Conflict and Contribution: The Jaina Community, British Expansion and Scholarship during the 19th and Early 20th Century. Berlin: EB-Verlag, forthcoming.
  • Framing the Jina: Narratives of Icons and Idols in Jain History. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
  • (With Lawrence A. Babb and Michael W. Meister), Desert Temples: Sacred Centers of Rajasthan in Historical, Art-Historical and Social Contexts. Jaipur: Rawat, 2008.
  • (Translator), Jagannātha Panditaraja, The Saving Waves of the Milk-White Ganga. Calcutta: Writers Workshop, 2007.
  • (Guest Editor), American Studies of the Jains. Jinamañjari 34:2 (October 2006).
  • Jains in the World: Religious Values and Ideology in India. New York and Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2001. Paperback edition 2011.
  • (Editor) Open Boundaries: Jain Communities and Cultures in Indian History. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998. Reprint Delhi: Sri Satguru Publications, 1999.
  • (Editor) Kendall W. Folkert. Scripture and Community: Collected Essays on the Jains. Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1993.
  • (Translator) Bhartrhari, An Old Tree Living by the River. Calcutta: Writers Workshop, 1983.

Recent and forthcoming articles include the following:

  • “Defending Jainism against Christianity and Colonialism: Jains and Presbyterian Missionaries in Colonial Gujarat.” Cooperation and Competition, Conflict and Contribution.
  • “God's Eyes: The Manufacture, Installation and Experience of External Eyes on Jain Icons.” Corinne Dempsey and Tracy Pintchman (eds.), Sacred Matters: Material Religion in South Asian Traditions. Albany: SUNY Press, forthcoming.
  • “In Search of 'Hindu Fiction': The First 'American School' of Jain Studies.” Cooperation and Competition, Conflict and Contribution.
  • “Jain Identity and the Public Sphere in Nineteenth-Century India.” Vasudha Dalmia and Martin Fuchs (eds.), Multiplicity and Monoliths: Religious Interactions in India, 18th-20th Centuries. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, forthcoming.
  • “Making it Vernacular in Agra: The Practice of Translation by Seventeenth-century Digambar Jains.” Francesca Orsini (ed.), Tellings Not Texts: Singing, Story-telling and Performance in North India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, forthcoming.
  • “’This is How We Play Holi’: Allegory in North Indian Digambar Jain Holī Songs.” John Stratton Hawley, Anshu Malhotra and Tyler Williams (eds.), Texts and Traditions in Early Modern North India: Selected Essays from the Eleventh International Conference on Early Modern Literatures in North India. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, forthcoming.
  • “When Will I Meet Such a Guru? Images of the Yogi in Digambar Hymns.” Christopher Key Chapple and Olle Qvarnstöm (eds.), Jaina Yoga. London: Routledge, forthcoming.
  • “Daulatram Plays Holi: Digambar Bhakti Songs of Springtime.” Jaina Studies: Newsletter of the Centre of Jaina Studies 8 (2013), 33-35.
  • “A Digambar Icon of the Goddess Jvalamalini.” Jaina Studies: Newsletter of the Centre of Jaina Studies 8 (2013), 42-43.
  • "God Outside and God Inside: North Indian Digambar Jain Performance of Bhakti." Imre Bangha (ed.), Bhakti Beyond the Forest: Current Research on Early Modern Literatures in North India, 2003-2009, 255-86. New Delhi: Manohar, 2013.
  • “’Today I Play Holi in My City’: Digambar Jain Holi Songs from Jaipur.” International Journal of Jaina Studies (online), 9:7 (2013), 1-50.
  • "Situating Darsan: Seeing the Digambar Jina Icon in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century North India." International Journal of Hindu Studies 16 (2012), 1-56.
  • “A Digambar Icon of Twenty-Four Jinas in the Ackland Museum, University of North Carolina.” Jaina Studies: Newsletter of the Centre of Jaina Studies 7 (2012), 30-33.
  • “Four Japanese Derivations: Haibun.” Abraxas 48 (2012), 82-88.
  • “History and Indology as Authoritative Knowledge: Debates about Jain Icons in Colonial India.” Brian Hatcher and Michael Dodson (eds.), Trans-Colonial Modernities in South Asia, 137-61. London: Routledge, 2012.
  • "The Goddesses of Sravana Belgola." Nalini Balbir (ed.), Svasti: Essays in Honour of Prof. Hampa Nagarajaiah for his 75th Birthday, 346-53. Krishnapuradoddi: K. S. Muddappa Smaraka Trust, 2010.
  • "In Defense of Icons in Three Languages: The Iconophilic Writings of Yasovijaya." International Journal of Jaina Studies (Online) 6:2 (2010), 1-45.
  • (With Lawrence A. Babb and Michael W. Meister), "Desert Temples: Archaeology in Present Time." Pierfrancesco Callieri and Luca Colliva (eds.), South Asian Archaeology 2007: Proceedings of the 19th Meeting of the European Association of South Asian Archaeology in Ravenna, July 2007. Volume II: Historic Periods, 19-26. Oxford: Archaeopress, 2010.
  • "World Renouncing Monks and World Celebrating Temples and Icons: The Ritual Culture of Temples and Icons in Jainism." Himanshu Prabha Ray (ed.), Archaeology and Text: The Temple in South Asia, 268-95. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2010.
  • "Budhjan's Petition: Digambar Bhakti in Nineteenth-Century Jaipur." Jaina Studies: Newsletter of the Centre of Jaina Studies 4 (2009), 39-42.
  • "Jains and Jainism in Patan." Manibhai K. Prajapati (ed.), The Glorious History and Culture of Anhilwad Patan (Gujarat) (Prof. Mukundbhai P. Brahmakshatriya Felicitation Volume), 540-88. Patan: Prof. Mukundbhai P. Brahmakshatriya Sanman Samiti, 2009.
  • "Contemporary Jain Mandala Rituals." Phyllis Granoff (ed.), Victorious Ones: Jain Images of Perfection, 140-57. New York: Rubin Museum of Art; and Ahmedabad: Mapin Publishing, 2009.
  • "The Cosmic Man and the Human Condition." Phyllis Granoff (ed.), Victorious Ones: Jain Images of Perfection, 34-47. New York: Rubin Museum of Art; and Ahmedabad: Mapin Publishing, 2009.
  • "An Epitome of Medieval Svetambara Jain Literary Culture: A Review and Study of Jinaratnasuri's Lilavatisara." International Journal of Jaina Studies (online) 5 (2009), 1-33.
  • "Green Pratikraman: A Friendly Proposal for Global Jains." Ecology—the Jain Way (15th Biennial JAINA Convention 2009 Souvenir), 122-23.
  • "Helen M. Johnson: The First American Woman Scholar of Sanskrit." Journal of the Johnson Library and Museum 3 (2009), 31-47.
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Quentin M. Duroy dr. Duroy, Quentin M. Duroy

Quentin M. Duroy
Faculty  |  Economics, Environmental Studies, International Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
202
740-587-6314
Service: 
2004-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., M.S., University of Rennes; M.A., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to & Intermediate Macroeconomics, Introductory Microeconomics, Economic Development, Economic Growth & Environmental Sustainability

Research Interests: Culture, Development, and Economic Growth; the Determinants of Environmental Sustainability; Evolutionary Economics

Research: 

Research Interests: Culture, Development, and Economic Growth; the Determinants of Environmental Sustainability; Evolutionary Economics

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Annabel Edwards Edwards, Annabel Muenter Edwards

Annabel Edwards
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry, Environmental Studies, Computational Science
Assistant Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
110
740-587-8556
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Williams College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Biography: 

The research questions I am interested in focus on the molecular level details of surfaces and thin films in nature.  As boundaries between two phases, surfaces and thin films provide unique environments for chemical reactions and molecular transport.  The current focus of my research is water movement in very hydrophobic films, or model wax films that mimic the waxy outer layer of the plant cuticle.  We use attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy to determine the hydrogen bonding environment of water molecules adsorbed into thin films.  Our time-dependent measurements of the rate of water penetration allow us to further explore different molecular level mechanisms for water transport through the wax portion of the plant cuticle.

Research: 

Publications

(Publications under Annabel H. Muenter.)

  • Muenter, A.H., Hentschel, J., Borner, H. Brezesinski, G. 2008. Characterization of peptide-guided polymer assembly at the air/water interface. Langmuir. v. 24 no. 7 p. 3306-3316
  • Olak, C., Muenter, A.H., Andra, J., Brezesinski, G. 2008. Interfacial properties and structural analysis of the antimicrobial peptide NK-2. Journal of Peptide Science. v. 14 no. 4 p. 510-517
  • Muenter, A.H.; DeZwaan, J.L.; Nathanson, G.M. 2007. Interfacial interactions of DCl with salty glycerol solutions of KI, NaI, LiI, and NaBr. Journal of Physical Chemistry C . v. 111 no. 41 p. 15043-15052
  • Lepere, M.; Muenter, A.H.; Chevallard, C.; Guenoun, P.; Brezesinski, G. 2007. Comparative IR and X-ray studies of natural and model amyloid peptides at the air/water interface. Colloids and Surfaces A. v. 303 no. 1-2 p. 3-78
  • Muenter, A.H.; DeZwaan, J.L.; Nathanson, G.M. . 2006. Collisions of DCl with Liquid Glycerol: Evidence for Rapid, Near-Interfacial D → H Exchange and Desorption . Journal of Physical Chemistry B. v. 110 no. 10 p. 4881-4891
  • Ringeisen, B.R.; Muenter, A.H.; Nathanson, G.M.. 2002. Collisions of HCl, DCl, and HBr with Liquid Glycerol: Gas Uptake, D → H Exchange, and Solution Thermodynamics . Journal of Physical Chemistry B. v. 106 no. 19 p. 4999-5010
  • Ringeisen, B.R.; Muenter, A.H.; Nathanson, G.M.. 2002. Collisions of HCl, DCl, and HBr with Liquid Glycerol: Gas Uptake, D → H Exchange, and Solution Thermodynamics . Journal of Physical Chemistry B. v. 106 no. 19 p. 4988-4998
  • Muenter, A.H.; Koehler, B.G.. 2000. Adsorption of Ammonia on Soot at Low Temperatures. Journal of Physical Chemistry A . v. 104 no. 37 p. 8527-8534

Presentations

  • Edwards, A.M. . 2009. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy studies of water transport in films inspired by plant cuticles. Poster Presentation at 13th IACIS International Conference on Surface and Colloid Science and the 83rd ACS Colloid & Surface Science Symposium. New York City, NY
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Brenda Franks Franks, Brenda Joy Franks

Brenda Franks
Staff  |  Environmental Studies, Education
Academic Administrative Assistant
Blair Knapp Hall
107
740-587-6250
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Tod Frolking dr. Frolking, Tod A. Frolking

Tod Frolking
Faculty  |  Geosciences, East Asian Studies, Environmental Studies
Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
306
740-587-6222
Service: 
1984-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of New Hampshire; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
Biography: 

As the sole geographer at Denison, I teach several introductory and regional geography courses designed to spark student interest and broaden understanding of the diversity of environments and human/environment interactions around the world. These courses help to foster geographic (and environmental) literacy which I see as absolutely critical to our future. As human impacts on the planet continue to increase, we must have a citizenry that is knowledgeable and can make sound decisions about land and resource use. I also teach three intermediate to advanced courses concentrating on different groups of earth surface processes - Weather and Climate, Geomorphology, and Hydrogeology. We spend considerable time outside observing and measuring atmospheric, hydrologic and pedologic phenomena as well as computer times using spread sheets and gathering data from the web. All of my classes have a significant environmental focus and most are linked with Denison's Environmental Studies curriculum.

I have led some student trips to Cuba. We have studied both natural history and environmental issues in and around Havana and in the provinces of Pinar del Rio (west), Matanzas (central), and Santiago de Cuba (east). More information about the May Term 2000 trip can be obtained through the Cuba link. 

Research: 

In broad terms, my research focuses on the complex interactions among landforms, soils and climate. I study the dynamic environments along the margins of the former great Laurentide ice sheets, with particular emphasis on glacial deposits and the genesis of soils and paleosols. Lately much of my attention has been on the timing of drainage reversals associated with the advance of ice sheets into the Appalachain Plateau in East Central Ohio. In addition, I have conducted collaborative archaeological research at several sites in central Ohio and have worked on the biogeochemical modeling of soil nitrogen. Our discovery of gut contents (with living intestinal bacteria) with the recovery of the Burning Tree Mastodon has added important information about the late glacial environment and megafauna diets. Much of my research has involved students, both as field assistants and in independent senior projects that contribute to my research program. Other student research projects I have advised cover a wide range of topics. Examples of recent student research projects include a presettlement map of Licking County vegetation, the origin and mineralogy of beach sands on Kelley's Island, coastal zone management in southern Sri Lanka, an analysis of lacustrine sediments of Glacial Lake Licking, and an assessment of soil nutrient loading at the Buckeye Egg Farm.

Publications

  • Frolking, T.A.. Holocene Hydrology, Soil Development and Landscape Evolution of the Bikeri Vésztö-Mágor Area in the Körös Basin of Eastern Hungary. Submitted for publication in monograph on the Körös Regional Archaeological Project in the Monumental Archaeologica Series, Costen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA.
  • Gyucha, A., Duffy, P.R. and Frolking T.A. . The Körös Basin from the Neolithic to the Habsburgs: Linking settlement distributions with pre-regulation hydrology through multiple dataset overlay. In review. Geoarchaeology: An International Journal.
  • Yerkes, R., Sarris, A., Frolking, T., Parkinson, W., Gyucha, A., Hardy, M. and Catanoso, L.. 2007. Geophysical and Geochemical Investigations at Two Early Copper Age Settlements in the Körös River Valley, Southeastern Hungary . Geoarchaeology: An International Journal. v. 22 no. 8 p. 845-871 View [pdf]
  • Frolking, T.A. and M.A. Pachell*. 2006. Glacial Lake Licking: Late-Glacial Drainage Diversions and the Formation of Black Hand Gorge, Licking County, Ohio. Ohio Journal of Science. v. 106 no. 3 p. 103-111 View [pdf]
  • Frolking, S., Frolking, T., Xiao, X., Boles, S. and Milliman, T. . 2005. A generalized methodology for mapping agricultural land use and management at sub-national scales, including a case study of combining census data and remote sensing data to map cropping intensity in Vietnam. Report prepared for Land and Water Division, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations 75 p..
  • Lepper, B.T. and Frolking, T.A.. 2003. Alligator Mound: Geoarchaeological and Iconographical Interpretations of a Late Prehistoric Effigy Mound in Central Ohio. Cambridge Archaological Journal. v. 13 no. 2 p. 147-167 View [pdf]
  • Stam, A. and Frolking, T.A.. 2003. Environmental Status of Cuba: The Cuban View. A course book for Environmental issues of Cuba (Denison May Term) based largely on interviews with Cuban experts (1999-2001), being modified and added to on a continuous basis.
  • Lepper, B.T., and Frolking, T.A.. 2003. Alligator Mound: Geoarchaeological and Iconographical Interpretations of a Late Prehistoric Effigy Mound in Central Ohio. Cambridge Archaelogical Journal. v. 13 no. 2 p. 147-167
  • Frolking, T.A. and Lepper, B.T.. 2001. Geomorphic and pedogenic evidence for bioturbation of artifacts at a multi-component site in Licking County, Ohio, USA. Geoarchaeology: An International Journal. v. 16 no. 3 p. 243-262
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David C. Greene dr. Greene, David C. C. Greene

David C. Greene
Faculty  |  Geosciences, Environmental Studies
Associate Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
308
740-587-6476
Service: 
1996-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., University of California, Santa Cruz; M.S., University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno
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Amanda M. Gunn Gunn, Amanda Meris M. Gunn

Amanda M. Gunn
Faculty  |  Communication, Environmental Studies, Queer Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
308
740-587-6396
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Biography: 

Amanda Gunn focuses her teaching and scholarship on the development of relationships and communities through engaged communication. Specifically, she explores questions of marginality, voice, and empowerment in a variety of communication context including interpersonal, small group, and organizational. She completed her BS at Appalachian State University, her MA and PhD at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

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Kevin Harrison Harrison, Kevin Harrison

Kevin Harrison
Faculty  |  Environmental Studies
Visiting Assistant Professor
740-587-5490
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S, Brown University; M.S., Scripps Institution of Oceanography; M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University
Research: 

“My research explores past, present, and future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. I am working on explaining why atmospheric carbon dioxide levels were lower during glacial times. My research on contemporary and future carbon dioxide levels attempts to explain why atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are increasing more slowly than expected.”

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Harry Heft dr. Heft, Harry Heft

Harry Heft
Faculty  |  Psychology, Environmental Studies
Professor & Chair (Psychology)
Blair Knapp Hall
410D
740-587-6674
Service: 
1976-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., University of Maryland; M.S., University of Bridgeport; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
Biography: 

Prof. Heft has been on the Denison faculty since 1976. His graduate training was in an interdisciplinary program concerning the relationship between psychological processes and the environment. At Denison, he has been a recipient of the Charles A. Brickman Award for Teaching Excellence. He has also been elected as a Fellow in both the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. Dr. Heft serves on the Editorial Boards of the journals "Environment & Behavior" and "William James Studies," and he is the Book Review Editor for the "Journal of Environmental Psychology." He teaches courses in environmental psychology, history and systems of psychology, and cultural psychology.

Research: 

Prof. Heft's scholarly interests primarily concern topics in the related areas of environmental and ecological psychology. His book "Ecological Psychology in Context" (LEA, 2001) elucidates the theoretical and philosophical foundations of ecological psychology and some of its connections to current work in cultural psychology.

Much of his research has examined the process by which humans find their way through the environment, with its focus on identifying the environmental information that is utilized in learning a path or route. On-going research in this vein is attempting to understand how this route knowledge can be employed to promote understanding of the overall configuration of a place. He has also conducted research in the past on the perception of affordances (i.e., the perceived functional meaning of objects and environmental features), the development of children's navigational skills, environmental aesthetics, and the effects of noise in the home on cognitive development.

Selected Student Research Collaborations

  • Heft, H., & Poe, G. (2005). Pragmatism, environmental aesthetics, and the spectator approach to visual perception. Paper presented at the meetings of the American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C., August, 2005.
  • Heft, H., & McFarland, D. (1999). Children's and adult's assessments of a step affordance for self and others. Poster presented at the meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
  • Gress, J.E., & Heft, H. (1998). Do territorial actions attenuate the effects of high density? A field study. In J. Sanford & B.R. Connell (Eds.). People, places, and public policy, Proceedings of the Environmental Design Research Association, St. Louis, MO.
  • Heft, H., & Kent, M. (1993). Way-Finding as event perception: The structure of route information. In H. Heft (Chair) "Navigation and environmental cognition: Ecological considerations". A paper presented at the meetings of the International Conference on Event Perception and Action, Vancouver, British Columbia.
  • Heft, H., & Blondal, R. (1987). The influence of cutting rate on the evaluation of the affective content of film. Empirical Studies of the Arts, 5, 1-14.

Publications

  • Heft, H., & Marsh, K.L. (Eds., 2005). Studies in Perception Action VIII. Lawrence Erlbaum, Publishers.
  • Heft, H. & Chawla, L. (2005). Children as agents in sustainable development: Conditions for competence. In M. Blades & C. Spencer (Eds.), Children and Their Environments. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Heft, H. (2003). Affordances, dynamic experience, and the challenge of reification. Ecological Psychology, 15, 149-180.
  • Heft, H. (2002). Restoring naturalism to James’s epistemology: A belated reply to Miller & Bode. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, 38, 557-580.
  • Heft, H. (2001). Ecological psychology in context: James Gibson, Roger Baker, and the legacy of William James's radical empiricism. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.
  • Heft, H., & Nasar, J. L. (2000). Evaluating environmental scenes using dynamic versus static displays. Environment & Behavior, 32, 301-322.
  • Heft, H. (1998). The elusive environment in environmental psychology, British Journal of Psychology, 89, 519-523. Heft, H. (1998). Why primary experience is necessary. Contemporary Psychology, 43, 450-451.
  • Heft, H. (1998). Towards a functional ecology of behavior and development: The legacy of Joachim F. Wohlwill. In D. Gorlitz, H. J. Harloff, G. Mey & J. Valsiner (Eds.), Children, cities, and psychological theories: Developing relationships. (pp. 85-110). Berlin: Walter De Gruyter.
  • Heft, H. (1997). The relevance of Gibson's ecological approach for environment-behavior studies. In G.T. Moore & R.W. Marans (Eds.), Advances in environment, behavior, and design Vol. 4. (pp. 71-108) New York: Plenum.
  • Heft, H. (1996). The ecological approach to navigation: A Gibsonian perspective. In J. Portugali (Ed.), The construction of cognitive maps (pp. 105-132). Dordrect: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  • Heft, H. (1993). A methodological note on overestimates of reaching distance: Distinguishing between perceptual and analytical judgments. Ecological Psychology, 5, 255-271.
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Erin Henshaw dr. Henshaw, Erin J. Henshaw

Erin Henshaw
Faculty  |  Psychology, Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
410E
740-587-5890
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Wittenberg University; M.S., Ph.D., Eastern Michigan University
Biography: 

Educational Background, Teaching, and Research:

Dr.  Henshaw is a clinical psychologist trained in interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral approaches to treating adult psychopathology.  She completed her Ph.D. at Eastern Michigan University, including a clinical internship at University of Michigan Counseling and Psychological Services.

Dr. Henshaw teaches courses in abnormal psychology, clinical psychology, introductory psychology, and health psychology. Her research interests include mental health treatment utilization, treatment of depression in pregnancy, and mental health stigma.

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Rebecca Homan dr. Homan, Rebecca Newcomb Homan

Rebecca Homan
Faculty  |  Biology, Environmental Studies
Associate Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
217/lab 226
740-587-5577
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Wellesley College; Ph.D., Tufts University
Biography: 

Teaching
BIOL 150 - Introduction to the Science of Biology
BIOL 202 - Ecology and Evolution
BIOL 312 - Herpetology
BIOL 370 - Conservation Biology

Research: 

I study the habitat requirements and long-term population trends of pond-breeding amphibians. I am currently working on projects designed to improve our understanding how both adults and juveniles choose among different suitable upland habitats. I also study long-term demographic patterns of several species with the goal of improving our ability to distinguish between natural and human-caused population fluctuations.

Research Papers

  • Homan, R.N., M.A. Atwood, A.J. Dunkle, and S.B. Karr. 2010. Movement orientation by adult and juvenile wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) and American toads (Bufo americanus) over multiple years.. Herpetological Conservation and Biology. v. 5 no. 1 p. 64-72
  • Homan, R.N., C.D. Wright*, G.L. White*, L.F. Michael*, B.S. Slaby*, and S.E. Edwards*. 2008. Multiyear study of the migration orientation of Ambystoma maculatum (Spotted Salamanders) among varying terrestrial habitat. Journal of Herpetology. v. 42 p. 600-607
  • Windmiller, B., R.N. Homan, J. V. Regosin, L. A. Willitts, D. L. Wells and J. M. Reed. 2008. Two Case Studies of Declines in Vernal Pool Breeding Amphibian Populations Following Loss of Adjacent Upland Forest Habitat. Herpetological Conservation: Urban Herpetology . v. 3 p. 41-51
  • Homan, R.N., B. S. Windmiller, and J. M. Reed. 2007. Comparative life histories of two sympatric Ambystoma species at a breeding pond in Massachusetts. Journal of Herpetology. v. 41 p. 401-409
  • Regosin, J.V., B.S. Windmiller, R.N. Homan, and J.M. Reed. 2005. Variation in terrestrial habitat use among four pool-breeding amphibian species and its conservation implications. Journal of Wildlife Management. v. 69 p. 1481-1493
  • Homan, R.N., J.M. Reed, and B.S. Windmiller. 2004. Critical thresholds associated with habitat loss for two vernal pool-breeding amphibians. Ecological Applications. v. 14 p. 1547-1553
  • Homan, R.N., J.M. Reed, and L.M. Romero. 2003. Corticosterone concentrations in free-living spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum). General and Comparative Endocrinology. v. 130 p. 165-171 View [pdf]
  • Homan, R.N., J.V. Regosin, D.M. Rodrigues*, J.M. Reed, B.S. Windmiller, and L.M. Romero. 2003. Impacts of varying habitat quality on the physiological stress of Spotted Salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum). Animal Conservation. v. 6 p. 11-18
  • Homan, R.N., J.M. Reed, and B.S. Windmiller. 2003. Analysis of spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) growth rates based on long-bone growth rings. Journal of Herpetology. v. 37 p. 617-621 View [pdf]

Conference Presentations

  • Homan, R.N. 2012. Fluctuation and Stability: A seven year study of spotted salamander demography and migratory orientations. Ohio Amphibian Research and Conservation Conference.
  • Homan, R.N. 2011. Multiyear demographic study of three co-occurring pond-breeding amphibian species. 96th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America.
  • Rumschlag, S.L*, T. Lan*, and R.N. Homan.  2010.  A pilot study examining the role of conspecific chemical cues affecting juvenile American toad (Bufo americanus) orientation behavior.  95th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America.
  • Homan, R.N., M.A. Atwood*, A. Dunkle*, and S.Karr.*  2009.  Multi-year study of adult and juvenile Wood Frog and American Toad migration orientations.  94th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America.
  • Homan, R.N., C.D. Wright*, L.F. Michael*, and S.A. Edwards*. 2007. Distribution of Ambystoma maculatum among different habitat types surrounding a single breeding pond.  92nd Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America.
  • Homan, R.N., C. D. Wright*, and D. Walker*, 2006. Correlates of location and movement of Spotted Salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) in the breeding pond. Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.
  • Wright, C. D.* and R.N. Homan, 2006. Demographic correlates between upland and wetland usage in Ambystoma maculatum. 115th Annual Meeting of the Ohio Academy of Sciences.
  • Homan, R.N., B.S. Windmiller, and J.M. Reed, 2004. Demographic clues about differences in relative vulnerabilities of two sympatric Ambystoma species. 18th Annual Meeting of the Society for Conservation Biology.
  • Homan, R.N., B.S. Windmiller, and J.M. Reed, 2003. Critical Thresholds Associated with Habitat Loss for Two Vernal Pool-Breeding Amphibians. 17th Annual Meeting of the Society for Conservation Biology.
  • Newcomb Homan, R., B.S. Windmiller, and J.M. Reed, 2001.  Demographic Consequences of Upland Habitat Loss on Two Ambystoma Species in Eastern Massachusetts. 86th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America.

* indicates student coauthor

Senior Research Projects Supervised

  • Robert Stenger ('13) - Spatiotemporal variation in microhabitat characteristics of spotted salamander habitat.
  • Justina Bartling ('13) - First detection of ranavirus in Taylor-Ochs Pond and American toad tadpole susceptibility.
  • Mark Mangus ('12) - Investigating the factors influencing migration orientations of the wood frog.
  • Eric Stachura ('12) - Habitat distributions of four life stages of the spotted salamander in and around a temporary ponds.
  • Tian Lan ('11) -  American toad and spotted salamander juveniles' ability to detect and orient toward conspecific chemical cues.
  • Joe Freundlich ('11) -  Multiyear study of three pond-breeding amphibians in Taylor-Ochs. 
  • Samantha Rumschlag ('10) - Amphibian habitat use: demography at an undisturbed pond and a pilot study for juvenile orientation behavior.
  • Meredith Atwood ('09) - A multiyear survey of amphibian demography and habitat distribution at a vernal pool.
  • Kyle Renaldo ('09) - Continued exploration of local small ponds: Examining amphibian populations and habitat type. 
  • Brian Slaby ('08) - Upland habitat use by a breeding population of Ambystoma maculatum (Spotted Salamanders).
  • Sarah Karr ('08) - An Exploration of the Larval Stage of the Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum).
  • Ashley Dunkle ('08) - Ecological factors influencing dispersal in Rana sylvatica (Wood Frog)
  • Gretchen White ('07) - Third year survey of a breeding population of spotted salamanders and their habitat.
  • Sarah Edwards ('06) - A survey of the migrating breeding population of spotted salamanders at the Taylor-Ochs pond in the Denison University Biological Reserve.
  • Dawn Walker ('06) -  Correlates of upland and wetland habitat use by spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum).
  • Christian Wright ('06) - Demographic correlates between upland and wetland habitat characteristics for a breeding population of Ambystoma maculatum (Spotted Salamander). 
  • Lindsay Michael ('05) - A survey of a breeding population of spotted salamanders and their habitat.

Professional Memberships

  • Society for Conservation Biology
  • Sigma Xi
  • Ecological Society of America
  • American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists
  • Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Joan Hunstiger Hunstiger, Joan Hunstiger

Faculty  |  Environmental Studies, First-Year Program
Visiting Instructor (part-time)
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Abram Kaplan Kaplan, Abram Kaplan

Abram Kaplan
Faculty  |  Environmental Studies
Associate Professor & Chair (Environmental Studies)
Barney-Davis Hall
108
740-587-6736
Service: 
1994-Present
Degree(s): 
A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Biography: 

Dr. Kaplan started his environmental career at Oberlin College, where he was one of the very first ES majors, and he also majored in Poli Sci. After college, he went off to Northern Virginia to work for a quirky company as a computer systems analyst. After two years there, he moved on to the Institute for Environmental Studies at UW-Madison, where he earned his M.S. in Land Resources and a certificate in Energy Analysis and Planning. He was the computer techie guy for IES during that time as well. Then he was off to Chapel Hill for his Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from UNC. His dissertation was about how to get electric utilities interested in solar (photovoltaic) technologies, relying on a national survey of managers. Dr. Kaplan was hired as the founding director of Denison's ENVS program in 1993, and finished his Ph.D. requirements just weeks before moving to Granville on New Year's Eve that year.

Kaplan's courses include Environmental Politics & Decision Making, Environmental Planning and Design, Environmental Dispute Resolution, the Practicum and Senior Project classes, and his new love, Farmscape: Artistic Perspectives on Farmland Preservation. His research spans a variety of areas that are all connected by the question, "How can we best relate to our environment?" In working with the U.S. Geological Survey, his efforts focus on creating an organizational culture that places this agency at the forefront of environmental science. In working with photography, his work deals with views of the environment that might make us think differently about who we are and where we fit in. In working with the spatial patterns of homeless people in Newark, Ohio, his interests are about designing urban communities to tolerate and encourage different peoples who perceive the environment differently.

Dr. Kaplan has two boys who love to explore and who care a great deal about the planet they're inheriting as they grow up. What can be more inspiring than that?

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Jordan Katz dr. Katz, Jordan E. Katz

Jordan Katz
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry, Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
740-587-5613
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Reed College; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology
Biography: 

Field of Interest:

The threat of climate change has made supplying energy cleanly and sustainably one of the most important challenges facing humanity in the 21st century. This area of research is not only of critical importance, but also provides a framework for a host of fascinating fundamental scientific questions. My research is focused on finding new, low-cost designs and materials for solar energy conversion devices that can meet the growing global demand for energy. This work draws from many different disciplines of chemistry, including physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, materials chemistry, inorganic chemistry, as well as nanotechnology. In my research I use a wide range of instruments and experimental methods, such as photo-electrochemistry, spectroscopy, microscopy, and diffraction.

Specifically, I am interested in finding ways to use materials such as iron oxide (Fe2O3, a.k.a. rust) for solar energy collection and conversion. Iron oxide is a semiconductor that is abundant, stable and environmentally friendly but in particular its properties are optimal for absorption of sunlight. Another promising material is pyrite, FeS2, which is also cheap and abundant and absorbs light strongly. When used in conventional designs, both of these materials suffer from poor transport and collection of charge carriers, resulting in low overall conversion efficiencies. However, by growing crystals in novel nano-structured geometries, thereby separating the axes for light absorption and charge collection, we hope to overcome these limitations while keeping the material's cost low. Simultaneously, we will explore other approaches to improve the photoelectrochemical properties of these and other related materials with the use of dopants (incorporating a low concentration of another element into the crystal structure). In our research we hope not only to find promising new materials, but also expand our understanding of the fundamental principles that determine the photoelectrochemical and physical properties of semiconducting materials in general.

Teaching

  • General Chemistry II (Chem 122)
  • Principles of Chemistry: Atoms and Molecules (Chem 131)
  • Structure and Reactivity of Organic Molecules (Chem 132)
  • Analytical Chemistry (Chem 231)
  • Intermediate Analytical Chemistry (Chem 331)
  • Instrumental Analysis (Chem 431)
Research: 

Publications

  • Gilbert, B.; Katz, J. E.; Huse, N.; Zhang, X.; Frandsen, C.; Falcone, R. W.; Waychunas, G. A. Ultrafast Electron and Energy Transfer in Dye-Sensitized Iron Oxide and Oxyhydroxide Nanoparticles.  Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics  2013, 15, 17303-17313.
  • Katz, J. E.; Zhang, X.; Attenkofer, K.; Chapman, K.; Frandsen, C.; Zarzycki, P.; Rosso, K.; Falcone, R.; Waychunas, G. A.; Gilbert, B. Electron Small Polarons and Their Mobility in Iron (Oxyhydr)oxide Nanoparticles.  Science  2012, 337, 1200-1203.
  • Gilbert, B.; Katz, J. E.; Rude, B.; Glover, T.; Hertlein, M.; Kurtz, C.; Zhang, X.  Thin Water Film Formation on Metal Oxide Crystal Surfaces, Langmuir  2012, 28, 14308-14312.
  • Gilbert, B.; Katz, J. E.; Denlinger, J. D.; Yin, Y; Falcone, R.; Waychunas, G. A. Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Study of the Electronic Structure of Oxidized and Partially Oxidized Magnetite Nanoparticles. Journal of Physical Chemistry C  2010, 114, 21994-22001.
  • Katz, J. E.; Gilbert, B.; Zhang, X.; Attenkofer, K.; Falcone, R.; Waychunas, G. A. Observation of Transient Iron(II) Formation in Dye-Sensitized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles by Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy. Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters  2010, 1, 1372-1376.
  • Paulauskas, I. E.; Katz, J. E.; Jellison, G. E. Jr.; Lewis, N. S.; Boatner, L.; Brown, G. Growth, Characterization, and Electrochemical Properties of Doped n-type KTaO3 Photoanodes. Journal of the Electrochemical Society  2009, 156, B580-B587.
  • Katz, J. E.; Gingrich, T. R.; Santori, E. A.; Lewis, N. S. Combinatorial Synthesis and High-Throughput Photovoltage and Photocurrent Screening of Mixed-Metal Oxides for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting. Energy & Environmental Science  2009, 2, 103-112.

Presentations

  • Inter-American Photochemical Society Meeting, Sarasota, FL, 1/2013
  • Global Studies Seminar, Denison University, Granville, OH, 9/2012
  • Denison Scientific Association, Denison University, Granville, OH, 11/2010
  • Invited Speaker, Geological Society of America Meeting, Portland, OR, 10/2010
  • Invited Speaker, American Chemical Society Meeting, San Francisco, CA, 3/2010
  • Invited Speaker, Reed College, Chemistry Department, Portland, OR, 9/2008
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 7/2007
  • Materials Research Society Meeting, San Francisco, CA, 4/2007
  • NanoX Conference, Global School for Advanced Studies, Taipei, Taiwan, 9/2006
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Rebecca Futo Kennedy dr. Kennedy, Rebecca F. Futo Kennedy

Rebecca Futo Kennedy
Faculty  |  Classics, Greek, Latin, Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
414
740-587-8675
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A. in Classical Studies from Thurgood Marshall College at the University of California at San Diego, 1997 M.A. in Greek and Latin from The Ohio State University, 1999 Ph.D. in Greek and Latin from The Ohio State University, 2003
Biography: 
Since arriving at Denison 2009, Professor Kennedy has taught a wide range of course on the ancient world including both Greek and Latin language course from the beginning to advanced levels as well as courses in Greek history, Athenian tragedy, Greek and Roman art, and ethnicity and the environment in the classical world. Professor Kennedy enjoys teaching courses that allow her to bring her research into the classroom. She is also currently experimenting with role playing pedagogies. 
 
Professor Kennedy's research interests include the intellectual, political, and social history of Classical Athens, Athenian tragedy, and ethnicity and identity in the ancient world. Her current research projects include a monograph Immigrant Women in Athens: Gender, Ethnicity, and Citizenship in the Classical City (Routledge) and essays on the interactions between geography, ethnography and medicine in the Classical world and its modern reception. She is a co-author and translator of Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World: An Anthology of Primary Sources (Hackett, 2013) and is editor of Brill's Companion to the Reception of Aeschylus (Brill Academic Publishers) and The Handbook on identity and the Environment in the Classical and Medieval Worlds (Routledge). Other publications include articles on Aeschylus' tragedies and Athena’s Justice: Athena, Athens and the Concept of Justice in Greek Tragedy (Lang, 2009). 
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Erik Klemetti dr. Klemetti, Erik W. Klemetti

Erik Klemetti
Faculty  |  Geosciences, Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
309
740-587-5788
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Williams College; Ph.D., Oregon State University
Biography: 

I'm a volcanologist/petrologist and I teach classes on the rocks and minerals that make up the planet, along with the magmatic processes that lead to volcanic eruptions. I’ve been fascinated by geology since I was young, either with the vast mineral collection my grandmother in Massachusetts had collected or with the vistas of Nevado del Ruiz from my grandparents home in Colombia. Every rock (or crystal) does tell its own story, and that is what geologist do: unlock the history recorded in the rocks. That is how I like to teach geology – by looking at the process the created the rock and then how we see the record of that process imparted on the physical and chemical characteristics of the rocks and crystals. In that way, geology tells us about the dynamic events that have created the Earth and will change the planet far into the future. I am also interested in how humans interact with geology, specifically how we alter the su rface environment when exploiting the multitude of resources within the Earth. If you’re interested in any of these topics, contact me via email or on Twitter (@eruptionsblog).

Research: 

My research focuses on volcanism and magmatism, both modern and ancient. I examine these processes by looking at the information recorded in crystals erupted in lavas and ash. By measuring the ratios of radioactive isotopes in these minerals, you can answer questions about the timescales of magmatic processes at volcanoes, such as how long does it take to generate a body of magma, how long can you store magma in the crust and what are the rates of eruptions during the lifetime of a volcano. All of these question lead us to a greater understanding of what happens under a volcano before an eruption.

Currently, I have active research projects at Lassen Peak in northern California, Mineral King in the central Sierra Nevada, and the Okataina Caldera in New Zealand. I have had students work with me on these research projects, leading to presentations at major geology meetings and co-authorships on research papers. If you’re interested in working with me, send me an email.

I also strong believe in making science accessible to the general public. To that end, I write a blog on volcanism called Eruptions. I distill the sometimes-disparate information out there about current eruptions, discuss volcanic process and features and break down current volcano research so that anyone can understand why its so exciting. The blog is visited by thousands of readers a day that vary from casual readers to seasoned volcano researchers.

Here are a selection of recent research publications if you’re interested in my research:

Klemetti EW, Lackey JS, Starnes JK*, accepted, Magmatic lulls in the Sierra Nevada captured in zircon from rhyolite of the Mineral King pendant, California: Geosphere.

Walker BJ, Klemetti EW, Grunder AL, Dilles JH, Tepley III F, Giles D, 2013, Crystal reaming during the assembly, maturation, and waning of an eleven-million-year crustal magma cycle: thermobarometry of the Aucanquilcha Volcanic Cluster: Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, doi 10.1007/s00410-012-0829-2.

Klemetti EW, Deering CD, Cooper KM and Roeske SM, 2011, Magmatic perturbations in the Okataina Caldera Complex at thousand-year timescales recorded in single zircon crystals from the Mt. Tarawera region, New Zealand: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v.305, p. 184-194.

Klemetti EW and Grunder AL, 2008. Volcanic evolution of Volcán Aucanquilcha: a long lived dacite volcano in the Central Andes of northern Chile: Bulletin of Volcanology, v. 70, no. 5, p. 633-650.

Curriculum Vitae: 
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Susan Klemetti Klemetti, Susan Klemetti

Faculty  |  Environmental Studies, First-Year Program
Visiting Assistant Professor
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Justine Law Law, Justine Law

Faculty  |  Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
Service: 
2014-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Allegheny College; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University
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Jonathan Maskit dr. Maskit, Jonathan Maskit

Jonathan Maskit
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Assistant Professor & Chair (Philosophy, Politics & Economics)
Blair Knapp Hall
205K
740-587-5641
2001
2002
Service: 
1997-2001, 2002-Present
Degree(s): 
A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University
Biography: 

Assistant Professor Jonathan Maskit joined the faculty at Denison in 1996. He earned an A.B. from Vassar College and an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University.

Jonathan Maskit teaches courses in aesthetics, continental philosophy, environmental philosophy, the history of philosophy, and others. His research focuses on the relationship between culture, nature, and art drawing particularly on the work of Kant, Heidegger, and Deleuze and Guattari. He is currently working on a book on this theme and has published articles and reviews in Research in Philosophy and Technology, Philosophy & Geography, Ethics, and Canadian Philosophical Reviews. He has also contributed to a number of edited volumes and has seen some of his work anthologized. He has been a visiting scholar at the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium) and the University of Potsdam (Germany) and has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, The Belgian-American Educational Foundation, and The Global Partners Project. He serves as the Reviews Editor for Ethics, Place, & Environment.

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Sandra Mathern-Smith Mathern-Smith, Sandra Mathern-Smith

Sandra Mathern-Smith
Faculty  |  Dance, Environmental Studies
Professor
Doane Dance Building
103
740-587-6713
Service: 
1988-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Portland State University; M.F.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison
Biography: 

Sandra Mathern-Smith has been dancing and choreographing for thirty-years and is committed to working collaboratively with improvisation as a performance form. She has had the pleasure of performing and collaborating with veteran improvisers such as Peter Bingham, Karen Nelson, K. J. Holmes, Chris Aiken, and David Beadle, as well as Butoh artist Katsura Kan. Her study of improvisation, including the forms Contact Improvisation, Authentic Movement, and Ensemble Thinking, has been with artist/teachers Danny Lepkoff, Nancy Stark Smith, Julyen Hamilton, Andrew Harwood, Nina Martin, Deborah Hay, and Barbara Dilley. Her work, focusing on collaboration, improvisation, and interdisciplinary projects, has incorporated video-projected backdrops, live music, poetic text, set designs, while working with artists of many disciplines. Contained, an installation piece created for solo performer involving 4 large moving screens with projected imagery and a voice activated environment, was presented at Dartington College, England (2006).

Artist Residencies at the Camac Centre D’Art, France (2012), and at the Atlantic Center for the Arts under Wally Cardona (2010), contributed to the development of her recent works Swimming in Green and I am Relative to You. She was awarded an artist Fellow at the Hambidge Center for the Arts (GA) and was a semi-finalist for the Headlands Center for the Arts residency program (CA). Recently, her work was presented at the Conduit Dance Guest Series (OR), the Texas Dance Improvisation Festival, the RAD Festival (MI), and at the Nomad Express International Multi-Arts Festival in Burkina Faso, West Africa (2014), where she was featured as a Guest Artist, Teacher, and Mentor.

Sandra received an Individual Excellence Award in Choreography from the Ohio Arts Council (2010), has twice received an Ohio Individual Artist Fellowship in Choreography (1993, 1996), and has been awarded over 25-grants for her work from the Ohio Arts Council, Arts Midwest, Target Foundation, Greater Columbus Arts Council (OH), Wisconsin Arts Board, and the Portland Metropolitan Arts Commission (OR), among others. She is a Professor at Denison University, Department of Dance, Granville, OH, where since 1988 she has taught courses in modern/postmodern technique, improvisation, performance, choreography, production, and collaborative art courses employing technology (Isadora, video, and sound). She received her BA from Portland State University and MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Andy McCall McCall, Andrew Christopher McCall

Andy McCall
Faculty  |  Biology, Environmental Studies
Associate Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
317/lab 521
740-587-8554
Service: 
2006-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Carleton College; M.S., Ph.D., University of California, Davis
Biography: 

I'm a plant evolutionary ecologist with special interests in pollination biology and plant-herbivore interactions. I also am interested in how insect phenology is affected by climate change. I am a big fan of field work and have study sites in Ohio, Arizona, and California. During the Ohio winters, I use manipulative experiments in the greenhouse to answer some of my questions (especially # 2 below).

Research: 

My current research questions are:

  1. Does variability in herbivore pressure over time affect the evolution of induced resistance in wild radish?
  2. How and why do florivores (things that eat flowers) choose what flowers to eat?
  3. How does florivory affect pollination and fitness in sacred Datura, Datura wrightii, in Arizona?
  4. What factors are affecting butterfly species richness and diversity in Northern California?

Recent publications

  • McCall, A.C., J.A. Fordyce. 2010. Can optimal defense theory be used to predict the distribution of plant chemical defenses? Journal of Ecology 98: 985-992.
  • McCall, A.C. 2010. Does dose-dependent petal damage affect pollen limitation in a California annual plant? Botany 88: 601-606.
  • Forister, M.L., A.C. McCall, N. J. Sanders, J. A. Fordyce, J.H. Thorne, J. O’Brien, D.P. Waetjen, and A.M. Shapiro. 2010. Thirty years of climate change and habitat alteration shift patterns of butterfly diversity. Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, USA 107: 2088-2092.
  • McCall, A.C. 2008. Florivory affects pollinator visitation and female fitness in Nemophila menziesii. Oecologia 155: 729-737.
  • Past and current lab members (Senior theses titles are given when appropriate):
  • Monique Brown, 2009, worked on how and if past herbivory affects resistance in wild radish
  • Josh Drizin, 2009, worked on pollination biology in Echinacea angustifolia
  • Stephen Murphy, 2009, Thesis: “The effects of induction on petal palatability in radish”
  • Jameson Pfeil, 2009, worked on pollination and seed predation in Echinacea angustifolia
  • Colin Venner, 2009, Thesis: “How does pollinator activity affect fitness in Echinacea angustifolia?
  • Heather Robertson, 2010, Thesis: “Does petal color affect florivores in wild radish?”
  • Caitlin Splawski, 2010, Thesis: “Plant recruitment in a restored prairie in Ohio”
  • Luke Avery, 2011, working on why butterfly communities change over time in California
  • Grant Adams, 2011, Thesis: “Does variation in herbivore pressure affect the evolution of inducible resistance in wild radish?”
  • Kelsy Espy, 2011, Thesis: “Does leaf damage induce resistance in wild radish flowers?”
  • Brian Jackson, 2011, Thesis: “How do abiotic factors affect succession on Mt. St. Helens?”
  • Eric Thomson, 2011, Thesis: “Floral visitors and florivory in Datura wrightii
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Gill Wright Miller ’74 Miller, Gill Wright Wright Miller ’74

Gill Wright Miller '74
Faculty  |  Dance, Environmental Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor & Chair (Dance)
Doane Dance Building
102
740-587-6766
1977
1981
Service: 
1976-1977, 1981-Present
Degree(s): 
B.F.A., Denison University; M.A., Wesleyan University; Ph.D., New York University
Biography: 

Dr. Gill Wright Miller, Associate Professor of Dance and Women's Studies, has been at Denison full-time since 1981. Dr. Miller earned her PhD from New York University in Dance and Women's Studies, her MA from Wesleyan University in Movement Studies, and her BFA in Performance from Denison University.

Dr. Miller's written research concerns public constructions of the pregnant body, healing from a developmental movement base, and body politics in general. She is highly involved in the world of experiential anatomy, most specifically Body-Mind Centering. She has received several grants for her work, including a major grant from the University of Minnesota, in “Embodied Research.” She accepted the coveted Arnold Professorship at Whitman College in Washington for Spring 2009. Her most recent book, Exploring Body-Mind Centering: An Anthology in Experience and Method, was published in 2011, and she is the author of many essays, including the 2011 publications of “Women in Dance” in The Encyclopedia of Women in Today's World and “Creativity and Mothering” in The Encyclopedia of Motherhood.” This past year, Dr. Miller published a chapter called “The Transmission of African-American Concert and American Jazz Dance” in Jazz Dance: Roots and Branches (Oliver and Guarino, 2013.) She is also compiling an anthology on African dance. Dr. Miller is currently working on an essay on research and methodology in dance studies and a second book on Somatics and the Body Movement in the United States, tentatively titled Pedagogies of the Body.

Dr. Miller teaches coursework in somatics, movement analysis, and cultural studies. Besides teaching somatics (including work from Ideokinesis, Bartenieff Fundamentals and Basic Neurocellular Patterns from Body-Mind Centering) and movement analysis (including reconstructing sections of works by Humphrey, Weidman, Limon, Cunningham, and others) every year, her recent courses include topics in dance's cultural studies, such “Modernism ReComposed,” “Postmodernism in Dance,” and “African-American Concert Dance,” and “The Body in Performance.”

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Frank (Trey) Proctor dr. Proctor, Frank Proctor

Frank (Trey) Proctor
Faculty  |  History, Black Studies, Environmental Studies, Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor & Chair (History), Director of (Latin American & Caribbean Studies)
Fellows Hall
404
740-587-5791
Service: 
2005-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of California, Davis; M.A., University of Arizona; Ph.D., Emory University
Biography: 

Frank “Trey” Proctor teaches courses in the history of Latin America and the Atlantic World. His research and teaching interests focus on Mexico, colonial Latin America, and Comparative Slavery.

Proctor’s research focuses on the lived experience of slaves of African descent and master-slave relations in Spanish America.  His first book, “Damned Notions of Liberty”: Slavery, Culture, and Power in Colonial Mexico, 1640-1769 (University of New Mexico Press, 2010) explores those issues in Mexico.  His next book project will explore similar questions from the perspective of the Spanish Empire in an attempt to move away from “national” histories.  His work has appeared in the Hispanic American Historical Review and The Americas and he has contributed chapters to the edited volumes Black Mexico (University of New Mexico, 2009) and Africans to Spanish America (University of Illinois Press, forthcoming).

In 2005, Proctor joined the Denison faculty after teaching at Whitman College in Walla Walla, WA for two years. Professor Proctor earned his BA from University of California at Davis, his MA from the University of Arizona, and his PhD from Emory University.

 

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Joe Reczek dr. Reczek, Joseph James Reczek

Joe Reczek
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry, Environmental Studies
Associate Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
207
740-587-6496
Service: 
2008-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin
Biography: 

Fields of Interest:

Research in the Reczek group spans several areas of Organic and Materials Chemistry, including Organic Synthesis, Supramolecular Chemistry, Crystal and Liquid Crystal design, and Organic Photovoltaics. We are broadly interested in the design, synthesis, and study of molecules which self-assemble, via non-covalent interactions, to exhibit new and unique properties. These properties are studies for potential application in new materials, specifically in the areas of molecular electronics and photovoltaics.

Current projects include:

  1. Synthesis and functionalization of anthracene diimides. Naphthalene and perylene diimides are two classes of electron-deficient aromatic molecules that have generated recent interest as components in Organic Materials and Molecular Electronics. The intermediate anthracene diimides show similar promise, but are relatively unexplored, largely due to difficulty in their synthesis. We are developing chemistry for the facile and versatile synthesis of anthracene diimides and related derivatives.
  2. Structure-property relationships in aromatic-aromatic charge-transfer interactions. The face-to-face association (pi-pi stacking) of certain electron-rich and electron-deficient aromatic molecules leads to formation of complexes with a new charge-transfer absorbance band. This absorbance is associated with the excitation of an electron form the HOMO of one molecule to the LUMO of the complementary molecule. We are interested in discerning how changes in the position of substituents and/or molecular orbitals of component molecules, affect the charge-transfer properties of the self-assembled complex.
  3. Aromatic donor-acceptor complexes as components of low-cost solar cells. The need to develop new photovoltaic chemistries for the efficient and affordable conversion of sunlight into electricity is a challenging problem of considerable importance. We are currently exploring the utility of aromatic donor-acceptor complexes as components of low-cost solar cells.

All research is carried out with undergraduate researchers, and a commitment to the training and development of the next generation of curious, innovative, creative thinkers and scientists. Students interested in participating in semester and summer research in the Reczek group should contact the Denison Chemistry Department or Dr. Reczek.

Research: 

Publications

  • Reczek, Joseph J.; Kennedy, Aimee A.; Halbert, Brian T.; Urbach, Adam R. 2009. Multivalent Recognition of Peptides by Modular Self-Assembled Receptors. J. Am. Chem. Soc. v. 131 p. 2408-2415
  • Mazzitelli, Carolyn L.; Chu, Yongjun; Reczek, Joseph J.; Iverson, Brent L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.. 2007. Screening of Threading Bis-Intercalators Binding to Duplex DNA by Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry. J. Am. Soc. Mass. Spec. v. 18 no. 2 p. 311-321
  • Reczek, Joseph J.; Villazor, Karen R.; Lynch, Vincent; Swager, Timothy M.; Iverson, Brent L.. 2006. Tunable Columnar Mesophases Utilizing C2 Symmetric Aromatic Donor-Acceptor Complexes. J. Am. Chem. Soc. v. 128 p. 7995-8002
  • Reczek, Joseph J.; Iverson, Brent L. . 2006. Using Aromatic Donor Acceptor Interactions to Affect Macromolecular Assembly. Macromolecules. v. 39 p. 5601-5603
  • Gabriel, Greg; Reczek, Joe; Iverson, Brent. 2003. Now Accepting Donation A - Molecular recognition in aqueous solution. Polymer Preprints. v. 44 no. 2 p. 453-454
  • Cheng, Ming; Moore, David R., Reczek, Joseph J., Chamberlain, Bradley M., Lobkovsky, Emil B., Coates, Geoffrey W.. 2001. Single-Site-Diiminate Zinc Catalysts for the Alternating Copolymerization of CO2 and Epoxides: Catalyst Synthesis and Unprecedented Polymerization Activity. J. Am. Chem. Soc. v. 123 p. 8738-8749

Presentations

  • Reczek, J. R., . 2009. Synthesis of Anthracene Derivatives as Donor-Acceptor Liquid Crystal Components. Central Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society (CERMACS). Cleveland, OH
  • Reczek, J. R.. 2009. Designing Aromatic Self-Assembly: From Bio-Mimetic Recognition to Organic Solar Cells . Invited Seminar Speaker at The University of Toledo. Toledo, OH
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Karl Sandin dr. Sandin, Karl Sandin

Faculty  |  Art History & Visual Culture, Environmental Studies
Associate Professor
Bryant Arts Center
502
740-587-6400
Service: 
1989-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University
Biography: 

Karl Sandin is an urbanist and urban/architectural historian teaching in Denison's Art History Program. His courses include surveys of classical, Medieval, and Renaissance/Baroque art, architecture and planning. Recent seminars include 'Cities Ancient and Modern', 'Sustainable Urban Landscape', and First-Year seminars on housing and homelessness. He links courses and research engagement with Denison's Environmental Studies Program and John W. Alford Center for Service-Learning. His research concerns the nature of neighborhoods and public spaces in urban settings, and in particular on issues of landscape, equity and diversity, and 'mat urbanism'.

Most recently he has engaged in community-based design facilitation with the City of Newark, Ohio. Students in several courses have been involved. These efforts include the 2007 Newark Charrette and the current East Main Street redesign project, undertaken with Newark city officials, local designers/planners, and Columbus, Ohio's Neighborhood Design Center, affiliated with the Knowlton School of Architecture and Planning, The Ohio State University. He received his Ph.D from Rutgers¾The State University of New Jersey in Art/Architectural History, and has been at Denison since 1989.

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Tom Schultz dr. Schultz, Thomas Schultz

Tom Schultz
Faculty  |  Biology, Environmental Studies
Tight Family Professor in the Natural Sciences, Behavioral Ecologist
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
227/lab224
740-587-6218
Service: 
1990-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Texas
Biography: 

Academic Positions

  • Professor of Biology, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2000 - present
  • Chair, Department of Biology at Denison University, 1998-2001
  • Director, Denison University Biological Reserve, 1994-2003
  • Visiting Lecturer, Department of Biology at Yale University, 1988-1990
  • Post-doctoral Research Associate, Department of Zoology at Arizona State University, 1985-1987
  • Lecturer, Department of Zoology at The University of Texas at Austin, 1983-1984
Research: 

Communication signals have both content, information intended to change the behavior of a receiver, and structural properties that determine how the information is transmitted from sender to receiver. My research concerns how the structural properties of visual signals evolve and are shaped by the ecology and environment of animals, whether they are detected by mates, rivals, or predators.

The males of many animals exhibit conspicuous colors that attract mates, advertise fitness, and mitigate conflict between rivals. However, visual signals may be intercepted inadvertently by other species and intentionally by predators. Color patterns evolve in response to some or all of these selection pressures within the limits of an animal's ability to see and produce color. Damselflies are an excellent group of organisms for studying these tensions, as they are highly visual, sexually dimorphic, and vulnerable to visual predators. Some species exhibit courtship displays, territorial behavior, or occur in assemblages of closely related species where signals may be confused. The learning and behavioral repertoires of damselflies are limited and their visual environments are relatively simple to characterize. These qualities make it possible to focus on the properties of color signals that make them more or less easy to detect, and their role in transmitting information.

I am also especially interested in the function of structural colors in insects, which have unique optical properties that may be tuned to certain viewing conditions. Insects produce structural colors through ultrastructural modifications of their exoskeleton. In combination with pigments, structural colors have the capacity to produce a wide variety of adaptive color patterns ranging from the flashing iridescence of some damselflies to the camouflage of tiger beetles.

Publications

* Student co-authors

  • Schultz,T.D. & O. M. Fincke. 2009. Structural colors create a flashing cue for sexual recognition and mate quality in a Neotropical giant damselfly . Functional Ecology. v. 23 p. 724-732
  • Seago, A., Brady, P., Vigneron, J-P. & Schultz, T.D.. 2009. Gold bugs and beyond: A review of iridescence and structural color mechanisms in beetles (Coleoptera) . Journal of the Royal Society Interface. v. 6 p. S165-S184
  • Schultz, T.D.. 2009. Diversity and habitats of a prairie assemblage of Odonata at Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota. Journal of Kansas Entomological Society. v. 82 p. 91-102
  • Schultz, T.D., C.N. Anderson*, & L. B. Symes*. 2008. The conspicuousness of colour cues in male pond damselflies depends on ambient light and visual system. Animal Behaviour. v. 76 p. 1357-1364
  • Fincke, O.M., A. Fargevielle, & T. D. Schultz. 2007. Lack of innate preference for morph and species identity in mate-searching Enallagma damselflies. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. v. 61 p. 1121-1131
  • Fincke, O.M., R. Jodicke, D. Paulson, & T. D. Schultz. 2005. The frequency of female-specific color polymorphisms in Holarctic Odonata: why are male-like females typically the minority? . International Journal of Odonatology. v. 8 p. 183-212
  • Schultz, T. D. 2001. Tiger beetle defenses revisited: alternative defense strategies and colorations in two neotropical tiger beetles, Odontocheila nicaraguensis and Pseudoxycheila tarsalis (Carabidae: Cicindelinae). Coleopterists Bulletin. v. 55 p. 153-163
  • Schultz, T. D. & J. Puchalski *. 2001. Chemical Defenses in the Tiger Beetle Pseudoxycheila tarsalis Bates (Carabidae: Cicindelinae). Coleopterists Bulletin. v. 55 p. 164-166
  • Kirkton, S. D.* & T. D. Schultz. 2001. Age-specific behavior and habitat selection of adult male damselflies, Calopteryx maculata (Odonata: Calopterygidae). Journal of Insect Behavior. v. 14 no. 4 p. 545-556
  • Schultz, T. D. 1998. The utilization of patchy thermal microhabitats by the ectothermic insect predator, Cicindela sexguttata. Ecological Entomology. v. 23 p. 444-450
  • Knisley, C. B. & T. D. Schultz. 1997. The Biology of Tiger Beetles and a Guide to the Species of the South Atlantic States. Virginia Museum of Natural History, Martinsville, VA. p. 236 pp
  • Schultz, T. D., M. Quinlan & N. F. Hadley. 1992. Preferred body temperature, metabolic physiology, and water balance of adult Cicindela longilabris: a comparison of populations from boreal habitats and climatic refugia. Physiological Zoology. v. 65 p. 226-242
  • Hadley, N. F., A. Savill, & T. D. Schultz. 1992. Coloration and its thermal consequences in the New Zealand tiger beetle Neocicindela perhispida. J. Thermal Biology. v. 17 p. 55-61
  • Schultz, T. D. 1991. Tiger Hunt. Natural History. p. 38-44
  • Schultz, T. D.& G. Bernard. 1990. Pointillistic mixing of interference colors in cryptic tiger beetles. Nature. v. 337 p. 72-73
  • Hadley, N. F., T. D. Schultz, & A. C. Savill. 1988. Spectral reflectances of three subspecies of the tiger beetle Neocicindela perhispida: correlations with their respective habitat substrates. New Zealand J. of Zoology. v. 15 p. 343-346
  • Schultz, T. D. & N. F. Hadley. 1987. Microhabitat segregation and physiological differences in co-occurring tiger beetle species, Cicindela oregona and Cicindela tranquebarica. Oecologia. v. 73 p. 363-370
  • Schultz, T. D. & N. F. Hadley. 1987. Structural colors of tiger beetles and their role in heat transfer through the integument. Physiological Zoology. v. 60 p. 737-745
  • Schultz, T. D. 1986. The role of structural colors in predator avoidance by tiger beetles of the genus Cicindela. Bulletin of the Entomological Society of America. v. 32 p. 142-146
  • Schultz, T. D. & M. A. Rankin. 1985. The ultrastructure of epicuticular interference reflectors of tiger beetles (Cicindela). J. Experimental Biology. v. 117 p. 88-110
  • Schultz, T. D. & M. A. Rankin. 1985. Developmental changes in the interference reflectors and colorations of tiger beetles (Cicindela). J. Experimental Biology. v. 117 p. 111-118

Teaching

I find it very satisfying and fun to explore the natural world, but my real passion is for the learning process. The challenge of being exposed to a new idea, questioning it, evaluating it, and even testing it, is very fulfilling for me. I especially enjoy making connections between seemingly disparate ideas or concepts in different disciplines (an important ability in a time when boundaries between scientific disciplines are becoming blurred). The courses I teach all involve integrating different approaches and levels of organization. Sometimes I think I have the perfect job in that I am paid to learn new things and share them with students, and to help them to develop a "Swiss Army Knife" of critical thinking skills. With these skills, they can become good leaders and thoughtful citizens in any field, and better able to face the uncertainty of the future.

Courses Taught:

  • First Year Studies: Animal Talk
  • Introduction to the Science of Biology
  • Ecology & Evolution
  • Biology of Insects
  • Animal Behavior
  • Senior Research

One of the best aspects of being at a small college is the opportunity for close faculty-student collaboration on independent research. I have had the pleasure of advising a number of undergraduate students who have conducted a variety of outstanding research projects, many of which have been presented at national scientific meetings. As a research advisor, I involve students in my studies of insect behavioral ecology or enlist students interested in conservation biology in conducting inventories and monitoring studies at the Bio Reserve and other sites in Licking County. In almost all cases, these projects require a summer of field work prior to the senior year. In the past, my summer research students have been supported with Anderson Research Fellowships or stipends provided through the Denison University Research Foundation.

Research Projects Supervised

  • Brindle, A. 2008. Differing social environments between primate populations may generate false positive evidence of cultural variation. *
  • Gorsich, E. 2008. Ommochrome signaling in male Enallagma damselflies: can long wavelength coloration be correlated with territorial behavior? *
  • Bring, B. 2007. A study of odonate community development, habitat preferences, and colonization among ponds and artificial wetlands at Dawes Arboretum.
  • Horn, J. 2007. Suburban habitat fragmentation: effects on migratory and residential songbirds in Central Ohio. *
  • Symes, L. 2007. Polychromatism and sex identity signals in the damselfly genus Enallagma. *
  • Symes, L. 2006. Polychromatism in the damselfly Enallagma civile and an assessment of the Male-Mimicry Hypothesis. (Poster presented at 2006 Meeting of the Ecological Society of America).
  • Hughes, D. 2005. The interspecific roosting behaviors of the Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) and Black Vulture (Corapgys atratus).
  • Dunlevy, J. 2003. Investigations of summer bird residents at five sites within Licking County.
  • Anderson, C. 2002. Enallagma damselfly colors as visual signals in relation to ambient light and visual backgrounds. * (Poster presented at 2002 Meeting of the Ecological Society of America).
  • Bucci, L. 2002. Effects of vegetation and landscape on butterfly diversity and abundance. *
  • Clark, E. 2002. Corellations of odonate diversity with lotic habitat characteristics.
  • Menninger, H. 2000. Examining the ecology of an indicator taxon: damselfly species diversity and the role of habitat heterogeneity. * (Paper presented at 2000 Meeting of Ohio Odonata Society).
  • Hauck, A. 1999. Correlation between male damselfly colorations and the light environments of courtship arenas. *
  • Menninger, H. 1999. Initiation of a long-term monitoring program for Odonata at the Denison University Biological Reserve. (Poster presented at 1999 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).
  • Kirkton, S. 1997. Babes in the woods: age-specific dispersal in the territorial damselfly, Calopteryx maculata. * (Paper presented at 1997 Meeting of the Ecological Society of America).
  • Scheub, C. 1997. Diversity and abundance of the Papilionoidea at the Denison University Biological Reserve.* (Poster presented at 1996 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).
  • Kirkton, S. 1996. Why do male ebony jeweling damselflies (Calopteryx maculata) aggregate far from territorial breeding sites? (Poster presented at 1996 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).
  • Casey, J. 1996. The significance of interference colors and visual communication in Phidippus audax, the daring jumping spider. *
  • Godfrey, P. 1996. Optimal site choice and foraging posture of the ambush predator Phymata fasciatus. *
  • Forbes, B. 1995. Substrate matching and cryptic defenses in the toad bug Gelastocoris oculatus. *
  • Stocker, E. 1995. Spectral sensitivity of the visual system in the praying mantis, Sphrodomantis lineola. (Paper presented at the 1994 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).
  • Angalich, L. 1994. Correlation between conspicuousness and escape flight behavior among species of tiger beetles. * (Poster presented at the 1993 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).
  • Gallo, T. 1994. A review of the history and efficacy of the Endangered Species Act and prospect for its renewal. *
  • Price, C. 1994. A comparative study of insect colonization and decomposition of pig carrion in central Ohio. * (Paper presented at the 1994 Meeting of the Ohio Academy of Science).
  • Puchalski, J. 1994. Comparative chemical analysis of the defensive secretions of tiger beetles (Cicindelidae) and leave beetles (Chrysomelidae). *
  • Van Antwerp, A. 1994. Light gap utilization and behavioral thermoregulation by the green forest tiger beetle, Cicindela sexguttata. * (Poster presented at the 1993 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).

* denotes Honors Project

Memberships

  • Animal Behavior Society
  • Coleopterist's Society
  • Dragonfly Society of America
  • Ecological Society of America
  • International Society of Behavioral Ecology
  • Ohio Odonata Society
  • Society for the Study of Evolution
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Russell K. Shekha Shekha, K. Russell K. Shekha

Faculty  |  Sociology / Anthropology, Environmental Studies, International Studies
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
103A
740-587-8553
Service: 
2012-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Florida Atlantic University; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University
Biography: 

Assistant Professor of Sociology/Anthropology K. Russell Shekha joined the faculty in 2012. He received his B.A. in Anthropology with magna cum laude honors from Florida Atlantic University. Dr. Shekha earned his M.S. and Ph.D. in Sociology from the Florida State University. His advanced training and specializations include the Sociology of Human Rights, the Welfare State, Collective Behavior and Social Movements, Political Sociology and Public Policy, Latin America, and Quantitative, Qualitative and Comparative-Historical Methodologies.

"At Denison University I focus specifically on providing engaged and active learning experiences to our students in the use of survey research methods to analyze social patterns and problems, the impacts of universal human rights and global/transnational social movements on society and culture, and the development of socio-political forces in Latin American societies. I work to generate excitement and understanding of American and global society and culture more broadly in our introductory course.

I extend teaching beyond the classroom to mentor our students throughout their academic careers. For example, I offer office hours on a regular basis, advise students on academic course and discipline selections, and provide tools and resources to balance academic, extracurricular, and social life. Just as importantly, I mentor seniors and summer scholars students as they develop their own independent interests culminating in top quality research projects that help prepare them for the variety of work that our majors do after they leave Denison.

My research interests are fueled by a desire to understand how universal human rights, global/transnational social movements, democratization, and globalization impact poverty/inequality, access to quality public health and educations, improvements in social welfare systems, and social equality for groups such as migrant workers, children, women, and racial/ethnic minorities. I also do research on public attitudes towards the welfare state and human rights which complement my larger interests above. I do all of this primarily using quantitative, sociological methods and blend and integrate sociological, anthropological, political economy, and international theoretical perspectives. My geographic interests are primarily in Latin America and other democratizing and developing regions, but also in the United States and Western Europe."

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Ahmed S. M. Soliman Soliman, Ahmed S. M. Soliman

Ahmed S. M. Soliman
Faculty  |  Environmental Studies
Visiting Assistant Professor
740-587-6763
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Doug Spieles dr. Spieles, Douglas James Spieles

Dr.Spieles, Douglas James Spieles
Faculty  |  Environmental Studies
Associate Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
107
740-587-5732
Service: 
2002-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., University of Dayton; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Dr. Doug Spieles (B.S. Biology, University of Dayton; M.S., Ph.D. Environmental Science, The Ohio State University) is an Ohio native who grew up near Toledo. As a graduate student, Doug worked first in environmental entomology and then in wetland ecology. His dissertation work was completed with advisor Dr. Bill Mitsch, the premier wetlands expert in the U.S.

From 1998 to 2002, Dr. Spieles was an assistant professor of environmental science at Southwest State University in Marshall, MN. While in this position, he helped guide the formation of a new environmental science program, which involved curriculum design, course development, recruitment, advising, and teaching.

In his scholarship, Dr. Spieles focuses on the ecological development of constructed wetlands, primarily from the point of view of community and ecosystem ecology. He also has interests in environmental education and environmental history. Doug is a member of the Society of Wetland Scientists and the Licking Land Trust.

Doug joined Denison's Environmental Studies Program in 2002 and has been instrumental to the program both in teaching (Science & the Environment, Environmental Assessment, Wetland Ecology and Ecosystems Management) and in developing an analytical laboratory facility in Barney, which is used for water, soil, and biotic analyses in both curricular lab exercises and scholarly research projects.

Research: 

Research Interests

I study the ecological development of constructed wetlands. The number of constructed and restored wetlands in North America is growing through mitigation for legal compliance and conservation efforts, but we still know very little about ecosystem assembly.  I study the communities that develop in newly created or restored wetlands and the nutrient and energy flow through those communities. My recent articles describe research at this level: nutrient flow through constructed wetlands (Ecological Engineering Vol. 14), invertebrate community development in constructed wetlands (Wetlands Vol. 20 No. 4), and energy flow through the primary and secondary production of developing wetlands (Ecological Modelling Vol. 161). Such community/ecosystem level research is valuable in that it contributes to our understanding of freshwater wetland structure and function and as it improves our ability to successfully restore or create wetlands.

My most recent research is on the succession and development of wetland mitigation banks.  Mitigation banking is the process of restoring, creating, enhancing or preserving off-site wetland areas as legal compensation for impacted wetlands.  There are currently about 220 mitigation banks in the United States, and most have been developed in the past ten years.  By law, these systems are required to be monitored for five years, but very little is known about their long-term ecological status.  I recently authored the first systematic analysis of the vegetative state of mitigation banks (Wetlands Vol. 25 No. 1). I am also studying the development of two mitigation banks in central Ohio—the Hebron Mitigation Bank and Big Island Mitigation Bank—by comparing vegetation development, macroinvertebrate diversity and trophic representation, and soil characteristics of these sites with reference wetlands in the same region (Environmental Management, Vol. 38).

Publications

  • Spieles, D.J. and J. Horn.  2009.  Macroinvertebrate community structure in created wetlands of different successional stage. Aquatic Ecosystem Health and Management 12(3)320-329.
  • Spieles, D.J.  2009.  Book Review: David Orr, Earth in Mind.  Journal of Environmental Psychology 29:168-170.
  • Spieles, D.J. and J.W. Mora.  2007.  Detrital sequestration and decomposition as measures of ecosystem function in created wetlands.  Journal of Freshwater Ecology 22(4):571-579.
  • Spieles, D.J., M. Coneybeer, and J. Horn.  2006.  Community structure and quality after ten years in two central Ohio mitigation bank wetlands.  Environmental Management 38:837-852.
  • Spieles, D.J.  2005.The role of biomanipulation in aquatic ecosystem restoration. In: Burk, A.R. (ed.)Progress in Aquatic Ecosystems Research.Nova Science Publishers, Inc. pp. 59-82.
  • Spieles, D. J.  2005.  Vegetation development in created, restored, and enhanced mitigation banks of the United States.Wetlands 25(1):51-63.
  • Spieles, D. J. and W. J. Mitsch. 2003. A model of secondary production and trophic structure in constructed wetlands. Ecological Modelling 161: 183-194.
  • Spieles, D. J. and G. Cunfer. 2002. Collaborative integration of GIS in co-curricular undergraduate research. Council on Undergraduate Research Quarterly September 2002, pp.41-44.
  • Spieles, D. J. 2001. Wetlands. In: Amato, A.J., J.T. Timmerman, and J.A. Amato (eds). Draining the Great Oasis: An Environmental History of Murray County, Minnesota. Crossings Press, Marshall,Minnesota. 282 pp.
  • Spieles, D. J. and W. J. Mitsch. 2000. Macroinvertebrate community structure in high and low nutrient constructed wetlands. Wetlands 20 (4): 716-729.
  • Spieles, D. J. and W. J. Mitsch. 2000. The effects of season and hydrologic and chemical loading on nitrate retention in constructed wetlands: A comparison of low and high nutrient riverine systems. Ecological Engineering 14: 77-91.
  • Spieles, D. J. and D. Horn. 1998. The Importance of Prey for Fecundity and Behavior in the Gypsy Moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) Predator Calosoma sycophanta (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Environmental Entomology 27 (2): 458-462.

Selected Publications

  • The fate of planted stock in the vegetation and seed bank of a young mitigation wetland, presented at the Society of Wetland Scientists Annual Meeting, Madison, WI 6/09
  • More precious than oil: water and international crisis, presented at Sigma Xi Science Café, Denison University, Granville, OH 10/08
  • Spatial analysis of Ohio wetland mitigation banks, presented at the Society of Wetland Scientists Annual Meeting, Sacramento, CA 6/07 and the Annual Meeting of the Ohio Biological Survey, Columbus, OH 11/06
  • Organic Sequestration and Decomposition as Measures of Funciton in Created Wetlands, Presented at the Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting, Memphis, TN 8/06
  • Indicators of Ecosystem Structure and Biotic Integrity in Mitigation Wetlands, Presented at the Environmental Bioindicators Conference, Baltimore, MD 4/06
  • An Assessment of the Floristic and Macroinvertebrate Communities of Two Ten-Year-Old Mitigation Banks, Presented at the Society of Wetland Scientists Annual   Meeting, Charleston, SC, 6/05
  • Mitigation Banks: Compensatory Creation and Restoration of Wetlands, Presented at the Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA 11/04
  • Ecological Development of Mitigation Bank Wetlands, Presneted for the Denison Scientific Association, Denison University 11/04 and for the University of Dayton Department of Biology, 10/04
  • Vegetation Development in Created, Restored, and Enhanced Mitigation Banks of the United States, Presented at the Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting, Portland, OR 8/04 and at the Society of Wetland Scientists Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA 7/04
  • A Model of Macroinvertebrate Trophic Structure and Oxygen Demand in Freshwater Wetlands, Presented at the Society of Wetland Scientists Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA 6/03
  • The Black Swamp: A Case Study of Ecological Succession and Human Inhabitation, Presented at the American Society for Environmental History Annual Meeting, Providence,RI, 3/03
  • Spatial Analysis of Waterfowl Habitat in a Restored Prairie Wetland, Presented at the National Wetlands Symposium, Indianapolis, IN 10/02
  • From Till to Tile: Environmental History of Murray County, Minnesota, Presented at PipestoneNational Monument, Pipestone, MN 5/02
  • Fire on the Prairie: Inspiration and Innovation in Teaching Science, Presented at the Minnesota Science Teachers Annual Conference, Willmar, MN 4/02
  • Macroinvertebrate Community Structure in High and Low Nutrient Constructed Wetlands, Presented at the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Society of Wetland Scientists, Chicago,IL 6/01
  • Active Learning in the Undergraduate Classroom: Co-curricular Undergraduate Research, Presented at the Collaboration for the Advancement of College Teaching and Learning, Minneapolis, MN 2/01
  • The Effects of Season and Hydrologic Loading on Nitrate Retention in Constructed Wetlands, Presented at the 20th Annual Meeting of the Society of Wetland Scientists, Norfolk, VA 6/99
  • Regional River Monitoring: Student-led Analysis of the Redwood River, Lyon County, Minnesota, Presented at the Annual Conference of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities Center for Teaching and Learning, Minneapolis, MN 5/99 

Professional Membership

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Catherine Stuer Stuer, Catherine Stuer

Catherine Stuer
Faculty  |  Art History & Visual Culture, Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
Bryant Arts Center
505
740-587-6749
Degree(s): 
B.A., Catholic University of Leuven; M.A., National Taiwan University; Ph.D., University of Chicago
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Kate E. Tierney dr. Tierney, Kate Elizabeth E. Tierney

Faculty  |  Geosciences, Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
307
740-587-6487
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Ann Townsend ’85 Townsend, Ann Critchlow Townsend ’85

Ann Townsend '85
Faculty  |  English, Environmental Studies
Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
201
740-587-6331
Service: 
1992-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Denison University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Ann Townsend is the author of two collections of poetry: Dime Store Erotics (1998), and The Coronary Garden (2005), and is the editor of Radiant Lyre: Essays on Lyric Poetry (2007), with David Baker. Her poetry, fiction and criticism appear in such magazines as Agni, Poetry, The Paris Review, The Nation, The Georgia Review, The Kenyon Review, The Southern Review, Witness, and many others. In 2003-2004 she received an Individual Artist's Grant in Poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts, and also won the James Dickey Prize in Poetry, sponsored by Five Points magazine.

She has published three chapbooks: Modern Love (1995), Holding Katherine (1996), co-authored with David Baker, and The Braille Woods (1997), and has given public readings of her work at the Associated Writing Programs Conference, The Poets House, Kenyon College, Ohio State University, Carnegie-Mellon University, Kent State University, Tulane University, the Bread Loaf Writers Conference, and many other workshops, universities, and bookstores around the country.

Her poems have been anthologized in: Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century (2006), The Extraordinary Tide: New Poetry By American Women (2001), American Poetry: The Next Generation (2000), Writing Poems (2000), The Bread Loaf Anthology of New American Poets (2000), Imperfect Paradise: New Young American Poets (2000), and The Pushcart Prize XX (1995)

At Denison, she teaches courses in creative writing, in twentieth century poetry and poetics, literary translation, and in the history of the lyric poem. She has also taught at the Antioch Writers Workshop, The Catskills Workshop, The Bread Loaf Writers Workshop, and is a member of the MFA faculty at Carlow University.

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Steve Vogel Vogel, Steven Vogel

Steve Vogel
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Brickman - Shannon Professor & Chair (Philosophy)
740-587-6579
Service: 
1984-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ph.D., Boston University
Biography: 

Steve Vogel, who holds an A.B. from Yale University and a Ph.D. from Boston University, has been a member of the Philosophy Department at Denison since 1984. He teaches courses in continental philosophy, nineteenth-century philosophy, environmental ethics, social and political philosophy, and logic. He has special research interests in environmental philosophy, in the work of Jürgen Habermas and of the Frankfurt School, and in Marxism, Hegel, and Heidegger. He is the author of Against Nature: The Concept of Nature in Critical Theory, published in 1996 by SUNY Press, and has published articles in Environmental Ethics, Environmental Values, Philosophy Today, Rethinking Marxism, Social Theory and Practice, Tikkun, Dissent, and elsewhere. In 2003 he was awarded the Charles A. Brickman Award for Teaching Excellence at Denison.

Interview with C.S. Soong on KPFA's Against the Grain, 3/13/13

Curriculum Vitae: 
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Wes Walter dr. Walter, Wesley Walter

Wes Walter
Faculty  |  Physics, Environmental Studies, Astronomy
Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
111
740-587-5704
Service: 
1996-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., University of Dallas; M.A., Ph.D., Rice University
Biography: 

I have been at Denison since 1996, following teaching experience at Saint Mary’s College of California and a research postdoc at SRI International. I enjoy teaching a broad range of courses including introductory physics, introductory astronomy, modern physics, electromagnetic theory, electronics and advanced lab. In addition, I have developed and taught several courses specifically for non-science majors, including “”Renewable Energy and Sustainability” (FYS 102), “Energy and the Environment” (Physics 100) and “Coming of Age in the Milky Way: Aristotle to Galileo to Einstein” (Honors 135 and FYS 102). I am an active member of the American Physical Society, the American Association of Physics Teachers, the Council on Undergraduate Research, and Project Kaleidoscope – F21.

Research: 

My research interests include laser spectroscopy, negative ions, and atomic and molecular collisions. The overall goal of our research program is to understand better the fundamental physics of electron binding particularly regarding the role of electron correlations, that is, how electrons "talk" to each other within an atom. Together with Prof. Dan Gibson (also of Denison's Physics Department) and many student collaborators, we have developed an on-campus ion beam mass spectrometer to investigate properties of negative ions using lasers. We do complementary experiments using the synchrotron Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. Our projects have included: investigations of the effects of static electric fields on laser photodetachment from negative ions (which leads to the formation of single electron interferometers); precision measurements of atomic electron affinities using tunable photodetachment spectroscopy; and investigations of inner-shell photodetachment at the ALS. This research is funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, the Research Corporation, and Denison University. Interested students are always welcome to join our research group!

Selected publications * Denison student

  • A. O. Lindahl, J. Rohlén, H. Hultgren, I. Yu. Kiyan, D. J. Pegg, C. W. Walter, and D. Hanstorp, “Threshold Photodetachment in a Repulsive Potential”, Physical Review Letters 108, 033004 (2012).
  • C.W. Walter, N.D. Gibson, Y.-G. Li*, D. J. Matyas*, R.M. Alton*, S.E. Lou*, R.L. Field III*, D. Hanstorp, L. Pan, and D.R. Beck, “Experimental and Theoretical Study of Bound and Quasi-bound States of Ce”, Physical Review A 84, 032514 (2011).
  • C.W. Walter, N.D. Gibson, D. J. Carman*, Y.-G. Li*, and D. J. Matyas*, “Electron Affinity of Indium and the Fine Structure of In Measured using Infrared Photodetachment Threshold Spectroscopy”, Physical Review A 82, 032507 (2010).
  • C.W. Walter, N.D. Gibson, R.L. Field III*, A.P. Snedden*, J.Z. Shapiro*, C. M. Janczak*, D. Hanstorp, “Electron Affinity of Arsenic and the Fine Structure of As Measured using Infrared Photodetachment Threshold Spectroscopy”, Physical Review A 80, 014501 (2009).
Curriculum Vitae: 
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James Weaver dr. Weaver, James Weaver

James Weaver
Faculty  |  English, Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
208
740-587-5794
Service: 
2006-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Allegheny College; M.A., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

James Weaver received his BA (1998) in English from Allegheny College and earned his MA (2000) and PhD (2006) from Ohio State University, specializing in nineteenth-century American literature. He joined the Denison faculty as a visiting assistant professor in 2006 before becoming an assistant professor in 2011. Weaver's research focuses especially on the intersections of literature and the environment. He is currently working on several articles about American travel literature and nationalism in the 1850s-1880s, and will soon begin work on a project exploring social media and contemporary narratives of long-distance hiking. In addition to teaching courses in first-year writing and surveys and seminars in American literature, he often teaches literature courses cross-listed with Denison's environmental studies program.

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Andrea L. Ziegert Ziegert, Andrea L. Ziegert

Andrea L. Ziegert
Faculty  |  Economics, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Associate Professor & Chair (Economics)
Higley Hall
209
740-587-6575
Service: 
1997-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., M.A., Miami University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to Microeconomics, Income Inequality, Environmental Economics

Research Interests: personality and learning in economics, poverty and income distribution, lotteries and government finance

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