Faculty & Staff

Annabel Edwards Edwards, Annabel Muenter Edwards

Annabel Edwards
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry, Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
110
740-587-8556
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Williams College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Biography: 

The research questions I am interested in focus on the molecular level details of surfaces and thin films in nature.  As boundaries between two phases, surfaces and thin films provide unique environments for chemical reactions and molecular transport.  The current focus of my research is water movement in very hydrophobic films, or model wax films that mimic the waxy outer layer of the plant cuticle.  We use attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy to determine the hydrogen bonding environment of water molecules adsorbed into thin films.  Our time-dependent measurements of the rate of water penetration allow us to further explore different molecular level mechanisms for water transport through the wax portion of the plant cuticle.

Research: 

Publications

(Publications under Annabel H. Muenter.)

  • Muenter, A.H., Hentschel, J., Borner, H. Brezesinski, G. 2008. Characterization of peptide-guided polymer assembly at the air/water interface. Langmuir. v. 24 no. 7 p. 3306-3316
  • Olak, C., Muenter, A.H., Andra, J., Brezesinski, G. 2008. Interfacial properties and structural analysis of the antimicrobial peptide NK-2. Journal of Peptide Science. v. 14 no. 4 p. 510-517
  • Muenter, A.H.; DeZwaan, J.L.; Nathanson, G.M. 2007. Interfacial interactions of DCl with salty glycerol solutions of KI, NaI, LiI, and NaBr. Journal of Physical Chemistry C . v. 111 no. 41 p. 15043-15052
  • Lepere, M.; Muenter, A.H.; Chevallard, C.; Guenoun, P.; Brezesinski, G. 2007. Comparative IR and X-ray studies of natural and model amyloid peptides at the air/water interface. Colloids and Surfaces A. v. 303 no. 1-2 p. 3-78
  • Muenter, A.H.; DeZwaan, J.L.; Nathanson, G.M. . 2006. Collisions of DCl with Liquid Glycerol: Evidence for Rapid, Near-Interfacial D → H Exchange and Desorption . Journal of Physical Chemistry B. v. 110 no. 10 p. 4881-4891
  • Ringeisen, B.R.; Muenter, A.H.; Nathanson, G.M.. 2002. Collisions of HCl, DCl, and HBr with Liquid Glycerol: Gas Uptake, D → H Exchange, and Solution Thermodynamics . Journal of Physical Chemistry B. v. 106 no. 19 p. 4999-5010
  • Ringeisen, B.R.; Muenter, A.H.; Nathanson, G.M.. 2002. Collisions of HCl, DCl, and HBr with Liquid Glycerol: Gas Uptake, D → H Exchange, and Solution Thermodynamics . Journal of Physical Chemistry B. v. 106 no. 19 p. 4988-4998
  • Muenter, A.H.; Koehler, B.G.. 2000. Adsorption of Ammonia on Soot at Low Temperatures. Journal of Physical Chemistry A . v. 104 no. 37 p. 8527-8534

Presentations

  • Edwards, A.M. . 2009. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy studies of water transport in films inspired by plant cuticles. Poster Presentation at 13th IACIS International Conference on Surface and Colloid Science and the 83rd ACS Colloid & Surface Science Symposium. New York City, NY
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Jordan Fantini dr. Fantini, Jordan L. Fantini

Jordan Fantini
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry
Associate Professor, Wickenden Chair of Chemistry
Ebaugh Laboratories
208
740-587-6491
Service: 
1997-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Penn State University; Ph.D., Cornell University
Biography: 

Jordan L. Fantini, an organometallic chemist, is interested in the synthesis and characterization of methylene-bridge-substituted calixarenes.  These molecules provide access to new structural motifs in calixarene chemistry.  A methylene-bridge substituent allows for modification of the solubility, conformational rigidity, and conformational preferences of a calixarene in comparison to the unsubstituted species.

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Michael Fuson dr. Fuson, Michael M. Fuson

Michael Fuson
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry
Associate Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
108
740-587-6782
Service: 
1989-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Haverford College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University
Biography: 

Field of Interest:

I am interested in internal motion in macromolecules, ranging from synthetic polymers to lipids and peptides. This interest began with my doctoral studies which used NMR spin relaxation to study molecular motion in model biomembranes. Such motions are involved in many of the functional properties of the membranes, such as permeation of small molecules and the interactions of the different membrane components. During my post-doctoral work I began studying the local motions of synthetic polymers in solution. Local motions in polymers are as fast as the motions of small molecules, which is interesting given the huge size of polymer molecules. My own work has focused on characterizing the anisotropy of that motion, with the hope of shedding light on the 3-D details of the motion. I spent the 1995-1996 school year at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where I became involved in doing computer simulations of the same dynamic processes I had been studying experimentally. Most recently, I have been using both spin relaxation and molecular dynamics simulation to study the internal motion of a small unstructured peptide, leucine enkephalin. It has been exciting to see how experimental and theoretical tools can complement each other in helping to understand molecular motions.

Research: 

Publications

  • M. M. FUSON and J. E. McFarland*. Concentration Dependence of Dipole-Dipole Cross-Correlation Spectral Densities in Polymer Solutions. Journal of Magnetic Resonance.
  • J. L. Fantini, M. M. FUSON, and T. A. Evans. 2006. Popping Popcorn Kernels: Expanding Relevance with Linear Thinking. Journal of Chemical Education. v. 83 p. 414-416
  • M. M. FUSON and M. D. Ediger. 1997. Dynamics of Poly(ethylene oxide) in Solution: 1. Localization of Chain Motion. Macromolecules. v. 30 p. 5704-5713
  • M. M. FUSON, K. H. Hanser* and M. D. Ediger. 1997. Local Dynamics of Poly(ethylene oxide) in Solution: 2. Vector Autocorrelation Functions and Motional Anisotropy. Macromolecules. v. 30 p. 5714-5720
  • M. M. FUSON and B. R. Klei*. 1996. Anisotropy of Local Dynamics of Polyethylene. v. 29 p. 5223-5227
  • M. M. FUSON. Coupled Spin Relaxation in Polymers. Encyclopedia of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, D. M. Grant and R. K. Harris, ed., (John Wiley & Sons: Chichester, 1996) . v. 4 p. 1466-1472

(* signifies undergraduate co-author)

Presentations

  • M. M. FUSON . 2008. Comparison of Spin Relaxation and Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies of the Dynamics of Leu5-Enkephalin. 49rd Experimental NMR Conference. Asilomar, CA
  • M. M. FUSON. 2004. Anisotropic Motion in Leu-Enkephalin Studied Using Cross-Correlation Effects in Spin Relaxation. 45rd Experimental NMR Conference. Asilomar, CA
  • M. M. FUSON. 2003. Dynamics Of Rubberlike Polymers In Solution Studied By Coupled Spin Relaxation And Molecular Dynamics Simulations. 44rd Experimental NMR Conference. Savannah, GA
  • M. M. FUSON . 2002. Leu-Enkephalin Dynamics as Studied Using Coupled Spin Relaxation. 43rd Experimental NMR Conference. Asilomar, CA
  • M. M. FUSON. 2001. Dynamics of Isobutylene in Solution Studied by Coupled Spin Relaxation. 42nd Experimental NMR Conference. Orlando, FL
  • M. M. FUSON. 1999. Coupled Spin Relaxation Studies of Polymers in Solution. 31st ACS Central Regional Meeting. Columbus, OH

Recent Student Presentations

  • Ryan Gingo* and M. M. Fuson. 2006. An Investigation of the Motions of Enkephalins Using NMR Spin Relaxation. 232nd American Chemical Society National Meeting & Exposition . San Francisco CA
  • Emily F. Trunkely* and M. M. Fuson. 2004. NMR Spin Relaxation Studies of the Motional Dynamics of Leu-Enkephalin. 227th American Chemical Society National Meeting. San Francisco CA

(* signifies undergraduate co-author)

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Jordan Katz dr. Katz, Jordan E. Katz

Jordan Katz
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry, Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
740-587-5613
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Reed College; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology
Biography: 

Field of Interest:

The threat of climate change has made supplying energy cleanly and sustainably one of the most important challenges facing humanity in the 21st century. This area of research is not only of critical importance, but also provides a framework for a host of fascinating fundamental scientific questions. My research is focused on finding new, low-cost designs and materials for solar energy conversion devices that can meet the growing global demand for energy. This work draws from many different disciplines of chemistry, including physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, materials chemistry, inorganic chemistry, as well as nanotechnology. In my research I use a wide range of instruments and experimental methods, such as photo-electrochemistry, spectroscopy, microscopy, and diffraction.

Specifically, I am interested in finding ways to use materials such as iron oxide (Fe2O3, a.k.a. rust) for solar energy collection and conversion. Iron oxide is a semiconductor that is abundant, stable and environmentally friendly but in particular its properties are optimal for absorption of sunlight. Another promising material is pyrite, FeS2, which is also cheap and abundant and absorbs light strongly. When used in conventional designs, both of these materials suffer from poor transport and collection of charge carriers, resulting in low overall conversion efficiencies. However, by growing crystals in novel nano-structured geometries, thereby separating the axes for light absorption and charge collection, we hope to overcome these limitations while keeping the material's cost low. Simultaneously, we will explore other approaches to improve the photoelectrochemical properties of these and other related materials with the use of dopants (incorporating a low concentration of another element into the crystal structure). In our research we hope not only to find promising new materials, but also expand our understanding of the fundamental principles that determine the photoelectrochemical and physical properties of semiconducting materials in general.

Teaching

  • General Chemistry II (Chem 122)
  • Principles of Chemistry: Atoms and Molecules (Chem 131)
  • Structure and Reactivity of Organic Molecules (Chem 132)
  • Analytical Chemistry (Chem 231)
  • Intermediate Analytical Chemistry (Chem 331)
  • Instrumental Analysis (Chem 431)
Research: 

Publications

  • Gilbert, B.; Katz, J. E.; Huse, N.; Zhang, X.; Frandsen, C.; Falcone, R. W.; Waychunas, G. A. Ultrafast Electron and Energy Transfer in Dye-Sensitized Iron Oxide and Oxyhydroxide Nanoparticles.  Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics  2013, 15, 17303-17313.
  • Katz, J. E.; Zhang, X.; Attenkofer, K.; Chapman, K.; Frandsen, C.; Zarzycki, P.; Rosso, K.; Falcone, R.; Waychunas, G. A.; Gilbert, B. Electron Small Polarons and Their Mobility in Iron (Oxyhydr)oxide Nanoparticles.  Science  2012, 337, 1200-1203.
  • Gilbert, B.; Katz, J. E.; Rude, B.; Glover, T.; Hertlein, M.; Kurtz, C.; Zhang, X.  Thin Water Film Formation on Metal Oxide Crystal Surfaces, Langmuir  2012, 28, 14308-14312.
  • Gilbert, B.; Katz, J. E.; Denlinger, J. D.; Yin, Y; Falcone, R.; Waychunas, G. A. Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Study of the Electronic Structure of Oxidized and Partially Oxidized Magnetite Nanoparticles. Journal of Physical Chemistry C  2010, 114, 21994-22001.
  • Katz, J. E.; Gilbert, B.; Zhang, X.; Attenkofer, K.; Falcone, R.; Waychunas, G. A. Observation of Transient Iron(II) Formation in Dye-Sensitized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles by Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy. Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters  2010, 1, 1372-1376.
  • Paulauskas, I. E.; Katz, J. E.; Jellison, G. E. Jr.; Lewis, N. S.; Boatner, L.; Brown, G. Growth, Characterization, and Electrochemical Properties of Doped n-type KTaO3 Photoanodes. Journal of the Electrochemical Society  2009, 156, B580-B587.
  • Katz, J. E.; Gingrich, T. R.; Santori, E. A.; Lewis, N. S. Combinatorial Synthesis and High-Throughput Photovoltage and Photocurrent Screening of Mixed-Metal Oxides for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting. Energy & Environmental Science  2009, 2, 103-112.

Presentations

  • Inter-American Photochemical Society Meeting, Sarasota, FL, 1/2013
  • Global Studies Seminar, Denison University, Granville, OH, 9/2012
  • Denison Scientific Association, Denison University, Granville, OH, 11/2010
  • Invited Speaker, Geological Society of America Meeting, Portland, OR, 10/2010
  • Invited Speaker, American Chemical Society Meeting, San Francisco, CA, 3/2010
  • Invited Speaker, Reed College, Chemistry Department, Portland, OR, 9/2008
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 7/2007
  • Materials Research Society Meeting, San Francisco, CA, 4/2007
  • NanoX Conference, Global School for Advanced Studies, Taipei, Taiwan, 9/2006
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Peter Kuhlman Kuhlman, Peter L. Kuhlman

Peter Kuhlman
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry, Neuroscience
Associate Professor
740-587-6698
Service: 
1998-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., St. Olaf College; Ph.D., University of California, San Diego
Biography: 

Field of Interest:

I think of myself as something of an intellectual vampire -- I feed off of the different aspects of my job. My research feeds my intellectual curiosity and helps keep my scientific knowledge current and well grounded in experience. Teaching is my passion, a real source of emotional energy. On this page, I've tried to give you an overview of both my teaching and research interests. I encourage you to look elsewhere on my web pages to find out more, and to email me or stop by to talk about anything here that intrigues you.

Broadly, my research interests lie in the area of Molecular Evolution. Specifically, I'm interested in the rates at which biological macromolecules evolve and the forces, both at the level of molecule and of organism, which constrain the rate of evolution of individual molecules.

The past decade has seen a true revolution in the technology of biomolecular sequence determination, and a corresponding explosion in the magnitude of sequence information available for analysis. This wealth of information has given us an increasingly clear picture of how and why biological macromolecules change over time. But it also highlights our ignorance. For example, virtually every large scale molecular evolutionary tree shows one or more groups of organisms with aberrant rates of evolution -- which shows up as unusually long or short branches. Yet no one is able to predict these rate hiccups, or even to explain them post-facto, and that intrigues me. But rather than simply looking for these cases of bizarre evolutionary rate, my interest is with the forces involved; I seek to explicitly test hypotheses about causal events that can drive rate abnormalities.

The goal of my research program is therefore to explore cases of altered evolutionary rate and to generate biochemical systems for testing hypotheses about the consequences of the rate acceleration. My focus for the last several years has been on one such case study: describing and exploring the accelerated evolution of the genes encoding the subunits of the RNA polymerase in chloroplasts of plants in the genus Pelargonium. To learn more about my research interests, and the projects that students have pursued in my lab, please see my research page.

Research: 

Publications

  • P. Kuhlman, H.L. Duff*, and A. Galant*. 2004. A fluorescence-based assay for multi-subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Analytical Biochemistry. v. 324 p. 183-190
  • C. K. Brown, P. L. Kuhlman, S. Mattingly, K. Slates, P. J. Calie, and W. W. Farrar. 1998. A model of the quaternary structure of enolases, based on structural and evolutionary analysis of the octameric enolase from Bacillus subtilis. J. Prot. Chem.. v. 17 p. 855-866
  • Y. Cho, Y.-L. Qiu, P. Kuhlman, and J. D. Palmer . 1998. Explosive invasion of plant mitochondria by a group I intron.. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA. v. 95 p. 14244-14249
  • J.C. Vaughn, M. T. Mason, G. L. Sper-Whitis, P. Kuhlman, and J. D. Palmer. 1995. Fungal origin by horizontal transfer of a plant mitochondrial group I intron in the chimeric coxI gene of Peperomia. J. Mol. Evol.. v. 41 p. 563-572
  • P. Kuhlman and J. D. Palmer. 1995. Isolation, expression, and evolution of the gene encoding mitochondrial elongation factor Tu in Arabidopsis thaliana. Plant Mol. Biol.. v. 29 p. 1057-1070
  • P. Kuhlman, V. T. Moy, B. A. Lollo, and A. A. Brian. 1991. The accessory function of murine ICAM-1 in T lymphocyte activation: Contributions of adhesion and activation. J. Immunol. v. 146 p. 1773-1782

[* denotes an undergraduate student working under my guidance]

Presentations

  • S. Stefanović, P. Kuhlman, P. Calie, and J. Palmer. 2007. Rapid evolution of plastid RNA polymerases in three unrelated flowering plant lineages. Platform talk at the joint annual meetings of the Botanical Society of America and the American Society for Plant Biologists.
  • P. Kuhlman and P. Calie. 2006. Accelerated sequence evolution of the four proteins comprising the core complex of the bacterial-derived DNA-dependant RNA polymerase in the plant family Geraniaceae. Poster presentation at the National IDeA Symposium of Biomedical Research Excellence.
  • S. Hoskins, J. Hogan, D. Bautista, P. Kuhlman and P. Calie. 2004. Modeling studies suggest that the accelerated sequence evolution in the a-subunit of the Geraniaceae DNA-dependant RNA polymerase is accompanied by a high level of conservation of secondary structure. Poster presentation at the annual meeting of the American Society of Plant Biologists.
  • P. Kuhlman and H.L. Duff*. 2003. A fluorescence-based assay for RNA Polymerase activity. Poster presentation at Experimental Biology 2003, the combined annual meeting of several national societies for experimental biologists, including the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
  • C. N. Gorman*, H. L. Duff*, and P. Kuhlman . 2000. Investigations into the function of the rapidly evolving RNA Polymerase in Pelargonium chloroplasts. Poster presentation at the annual meeting of the (international) Protein Society.
  • H. Duff*, T. Wine*, and P. Kuhlman . 1999. Investigation of the rapidly evolving plastid RNA polymerase in Pelargonium. Poster presentation at the International Botanical Congress.
  • P. Kuhlman, P. J. Calie, J. M. Logsdon, A. Z. Wang*, G. Vora*, B. Thomason*, and J. D. Palmer . 1998. Accelerated evolution of the chloroplast-encoded RNA polymerase driven by positive Darwinian selection. Talk given at the 1998 international meeting of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.
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Sonya L. McKay dr. McKay, Sonya Lee L. McKay

Sonya L. McKay
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry
Associate Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
118
740-587-6363
Service: 
2000-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Kenyon College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
Biography: 

Sonya L. McKay, a biophysical organic chemist, is interested in research using NMR and nonnatural amino acids to understand how the molecular level interactions dictated by the primary structure of peptides and proteins influence secondary and tertiary structures and protein folding. She is also investigating the synthesis of a chemically acylated collagen protein for its use as a drug delivery vehicle. 

Research: 

Field of Interest: Investigation of biologically important molecules including peptides and collagen using solid phase peptide synthesis and NMR.

Curriculum Vitae: 
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Rachel Mitton-Fry dr. Mitton-Fry, Rachel Mitton-Fry

Dr.Mitton-Fry, Rachel Mitton-Fry
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry
Assistant Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
205
740-587-5691
Service: 
2011-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Carleton College; Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder
Biography: 

Field of interest:

The past decade has seen explosive discovery of non-coding and structural RNAs in biological systems.  Full understanding of these RNA molecules requires detailed characterization of their structures and dynamics. Current efforts in the Mitton-Fry laboratory focus on study of structure-function relationships in a class of RNA elements known as RNA thermosensors. These elements, most commonly found in the 5´-untranslated region (UTR) of bacterial genes, adopt temperature-sensitive structures that affect gene expression levels in response to temperature variation. No protein cofactors have been found to be required for thermosensor function. Most known thermosensors regulate translation of proteins involved in heat or cold shock responses or in pathogenic virulence. My lab seeks to characterize RNA thermosensors using a variety of biochemical and biophysical means, with the goal of greater understanding of the determinants for thermosensor function in biological systems.

I have strong commitment to working with undergraduates on this research, both in the summer and throughout the academic year.

Research: 

Publications:

  • Mitton-Fry, R. M.; DeGregorio, S. J.; Wang, J.; Steitz, T. A.; Steitz, J. A. 2010.  Poly(A) tail recognition by a viral RNA element through assembly of a triple helix. Science, 330, 1244-1247.
  • Steitz, J.; Borah, S.; Cazalla, D.; Fok, V.; Lytle, R.; Mitton-Fry, R.; Riley, K.; Samji, T. 2010. Noncoding RNPs of viral origin. Cold Spring Harb. Perspect. Biol,. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a005165.
  • Fok, V.;‡ Mitton-Fry, R. M.; ‡ Grech, A.; Steitz, J. A. 2006. Multiple domains of EBER 1, an Epstein-Barr virus noncoding RNA, recruit ribosomal protein L22. RNA, 12, 872-882.  ‡Equal authorship.
  • Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Anderson, E. M.; Theobald, D. L.; Glustrom, L. W.; Wuttke, D. S. 2004. Structural basis for telomeric single-stranded DNA recognition by yeast Cdc13. J. Mol. Biol., 338, 241-255. 
  • Theobald, D. L.; Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Wuttke, D. S. 2003. Nucleic acid recognition by OB-fold proteins. Ann. Rev. Biophys. Biomol. Struct., 32, 115-133.
  • Glustrom, L. W.; Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Wuttke, D. S. 2002. Re: 1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene and polychlorinated biphenyls and breast cancer: combined analysis of five U.S. studies. Reviewed letter. J. Natl. Cancer Inst., 94, 1337-1338.
  • Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Anderson, E. M.; Hughes, T. R.; Lundblad, V.; Wuttke, D. S.  2002. Conservation of structure for recognition of single-stranded telomeric DNA. Science, 296, 145-147.
  • Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Wuttke, D. S. 2002. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of the DNA-binding domain of the essential protein Cdc13 complexed with single-stranded telomeric DNA. J. Biomol. NMR, 22, 379-380.
  • Ojennus, D. D.; Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Wuttke, D. S. 1999. Induced alignment and measurement of dipolar couplings of an SH2 domain through direct binding with filamentous phage.  J. Biomol. NMR, 14, 175-179.
  • Norris, J. W.; Fry, R. M.; Tu, A. T. 1997. The nucleotide sequence of the translated and untranslated regions of a cDNA for myotoxin a from the venom of prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis).  Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm., 230, 607-610.

Presentations:

  • Mitton-Fry, R. M., *Cempre, C. B., *Cornell, H. K., *Frandsen, J. K., *Ulanowicz, K. U. 2013. Biochemical characterization of RNA thermosensor structure. Poster presentation at the American Chemical Society 246th National Meeting.  Indianapolis, IN.

Student presentations:

  • *Cempre, C. B., *Ulanowicz, K. A., Mitton-Fry, R. M. 2013. SHAPE analysis of a potential RNA thermosensor in Salmonella enterica.  Poster presentation at the 2013 Rustbelt RNA Meeting. Cleveland, OH.
  • *Frandsen, J. K., *Cornell, J. K., Mitton-Fry, R. M. 2013. Biochemical investigation of a potential RNA thermometer in Enterobacter cloacae.  Poster presentation at the 2013 Rustbelt RNA Meeting. Cleveland, OH.
  • *Ulanowicz, K. A., *Cempre, C. B., Mitton-Fry, R. M. 2013. Characterization of a hypothetical RNA thermometer in Enterobacter cloacae using SHAPE analysis.
  • Poster presentation at the 2013 Rustbelt RNA Meeting. Cleveland, OH.

* denotes Denison undergraduate.

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Joe Reczek dr. Reczek, Joseph James Reczek

Joe Reczek
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry, Environmental Studies
Assistant Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
207
740-587-6496
Service: 
2008-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin
Biography: 

Fields of Interest:

Research in the Reczek group spans several areas of Organic and Materials Chemistry, including Organic Synthesis, Supramolecular Chemistry, Crystal and Liquid Crystal design, and Organic Photovoltaics. We are broadly interested in the design, synthesis, and study of molecules which self-assemble, via non-covalent interactions, to exhibit new and unique properties. These properties are studies for potential application in new materials, specifically in the areas of molecular electronics and photovoltaics.

Current projects include:

  1. Synthesis and functionalization of anthracene diimides. Naphthalene and perylene diimides are two classes of electron-deficient aromatic molecules that have generated recent interest as components in Organic Materials and Molecular Electronics. The intermediate anthracene diimides show similar promise, but are relatively unexplored, largely due to difficulty in their synthesis. We are developing chemistry for the facile and versatile synthesis of anthracene diimides and related derivatives.
  2. Structure-property relationships in aromatic-aromatic charge-transfer interactions. The face-to-face association (pi-pi stacking) of certain electron-rich and electron-deficient aromatic molecules leads to formation of complexes with a new charge-transfer absorbance band. This absorbance is associated with the excitation of an electron form the HOMO of one molecule to the LUMO of the complementary molecule. We are interested in discerning how changes in the position of substituents and/or molecular orbitals of component molecules, affect the charge-transfer properties of the self-assembled complex.
  3. Aromatic donor-acceptor complexes as components of low-cost solar cells. The need to develop new photovoltaic chemistries for the efficient and affordable conversion of sunlight into electricity is a challenging problem of considerable importance. We are currently exploring the utility of aromatic donor-acceptor complexes as components of low-cost solar cells.

All research is carried out with undergraduate researchers, and a commitment to the training and development of the next generation of curious, innovative, creative thinkers and scientists. Students interested in participating in semester and summer research in the Reczek group should contact the Denison Chemistry Department or Dr. Reczek.

Research: 

Publications

  • Reczek, Joseph J.; Kennedy, Aimee A.; Halbert, Brian T.; Urbach, Adam R. 2009. Multivalent Recognition of Peptides by Modular Self-Assembled Receptors. J. Am. Chem. Soc. v. 131 p. 2408-2415
  • Mazzitelli, Carolyn L.; Chu, Yongjun; Reczek, Joseph J.; Iverson, Brent L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.. 2007. Screening of Threading Bis-Intercalators Binding to Duplex DNA by Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry. J. Am. Soc. Mass. Spec. v. 18 no. 2 p. 311-321
  • Reczek, Joseph J.; Villazor, Karen R.; Lynch, Vincent; Swager, Timothy M.; Iverson, Brent L.. 2006. Tunable Columnar Mesophases Utilizing C2 Symmetric Aromatic Donor-Acceptor Complexes. J. Am. Chem. Soc. v. 128 p. 7995-8002
  • Reczek, Joseph J.; Iverson, Brent L. . 2006. Using Aromatic Donor Acceptor Interactions to Affect Macromolecular Assembly. Macromolecules. v. 39 p. 5601-5603
  • Gabriel, Greg; Reczek, Joe; Iverson, Brent. 2003. Now Accepting Donation A - Molecular recognition in aqueous solution. Polymer Preprints. v. 44 no. 2 p. 453-454
  • Cheng, Ming; Moore, David R., Reczek, Joseph J., Chamberlain, Bradley M., Lobkovsky, Emil B., Coates, Geoffrey W.. 2001. Single-Site-Diiminate Zinc Catalysts for the Alternating Copolymerization of CO2 and Epoxides: Catalyst Synthesis and Unprecedented Polymerization Activity. J. Am. Chem. Soc. v. 123 p. 8738-8749

Presentations

  • Reczek, J. R., . 2009. Synthesis of Anthracene Derivatives as Donor-Acceptor Liquid Crystal Components. Central Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society (CERMACS). Cleveland, OH
  • Reczek, J. R.. 2009. Designing Aromatic Self-Assembly: From Bio-Mimetic Recognition to Organic Solar Cells . Invited Seminar Speaker at The University of Toledo. Toledo, OH
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Cathy Romei Romei, Cathy L. Romei

Romei, Cathy L. Romei
Staff  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry
Academic Administative Assistant
Ebaugh Laboratories
101
740-587-6490
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Chuck Sokolik dr. Sokolik, Charles  Sokolik

Chuck Sokolik
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry
Associate Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
120
740-587-6497
Service: 
1993-Present
Degree(s): 
A.B., Vassar College; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles
Biography: 

Field of Interest:

  • Enzyme and peptide microarray synthesis using electrostatic printing, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in combinatorial peptide array analysis, consultant and collaborator with Gary M. Nishioka, Ph.D., H & N Instruments Inc., Newark, Ohio
  • Cloning, purification and characterization of Haloarcula marismortui methionine aminopeptidase
  • Measurement of antibody/antigen binding strength using atomic force microscopy
Research: 

Publications

  • Nishioka, Gary M., Sokolik, Charles W., and Borikova, Asya. Electrospray Printing of Enzyme Microarrays. (in preparation).
  • Sokolik, Charles W., Walker, Annie S., and Nishioka, Gary M. A Simple and Sensitive Assay for Microprinting Applications. (in preparation).
  • Sokolik, Charles W. 1998. A Maple program that illustrates the affect of pH on peptide charge. J. Chem. Ed. v. 75 p. 1500-1502
  • Sokolik, Charles W. 1995. Kinemages: make your own molecules for teaching. . Trends Biochem Sci. v. 20 p. 122-124
  • Shao, Ming-Chuan, Sokolik, Charles W., and Wold, Finn. 1994. Noncovalent Neoglycoproteins,in Neoglycoconjugates: Preparation and Applications. (Lee, Y. C. and Lee, R. T., ed) Academic Press Inc .
  • Sokolik, Charles W. 1994. Kinemage cookbook: a tutorial for kinemage authors. Protein Sci., 3, Number 2, Diskette Appendix.
  • Sokolik, Charles W., Liang, Chyau, and Wold, Finn. 1994. Studies on the specificity of acetylaminoacyl-peptide hydrolase. Protein Sci. (supplementary material on diskette appendix). v. 3 p. 126-131
  • Shao, Ming-Chuan, Sokolik, Charles W., and Wold, Finn. 1994. Specificity studies of the GDP-[L]-fucose: 2-acetamido-2-deoxy--[D]-glucoside (Fuc ---> Asn-linked GlcNAc) 6--[L]-fucosyltransferase from rat-liver Golgi membranes . Carbohydr. Res. v. 251 p. 163-173
  • Sokolik, Charles W., and Cohen, Robert E.. 1992. Ubiquitin conjugation to cytochromes c: structure of the yeast iso-1 conjugate and possible recognition determinants. Chem.. v. 267 p. 1067-1071.
  • Norrod, E. Pinina, Mintz, Clifford S., and Sokolik, Charles W. 1985. Induction by growth medium of changes in gonococcal lipopolysaccharides. Pathogenic Neisseria, Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium. p. 395-399

Presentations

  • Nishioka, Gary M., Borikova, Asya L., and Sokolik, Charles W. 2006. High Resolution Microprinting with an Electrospray Printer. National Meeting of Experimental Biology. San Francisco, CA
  • Walters, Shelby L., Miller, Clinton J., and Sokolik, Charles W. 2004. Assessment of adhesion forces between an antibody and its peptide-antigens immobilized on a silica surface using atomic force microscopy. Presented at the 227th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. Anaheim, CA
  • McCoy, Meredith and Sokolik, Charles W. 2003. Cloning Methionine Aminopeptidase from the ExtremeHalophile Haloarcula marismortui. National Meeting of Experimental Biology. San Diego, CA
  • Sokolik, Charles W, Eschelbach, John W., and Nishioka, Gary M. 2001. Determination of the binding force of an antibody with its cognate antigen by atomic force microscopy. PITTCON . New Orleans, LA
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Kimberly Specht Specht, Kimberly  Specht

Kimberly Specht
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry
Associate Professor & Chair (Chemistry & Biochemistry), James M. and Carolyn O. Gillingham Endowed Professor
740-587-6635
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., University of Notre Dame; M.S., Ph.D., Princeton University
Biography: 

Field of Interest:

My research interests are interdisciplinary in nature, spanning the traditional boundaries of synthetic organic chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology. I am interested in the chemistry of biological surfaces, particularly those that contain sugars, and the role of the sugars at these surfaces.One project in my group looks to develop a model system for glycosylated surfaces. While cell surfaces are covered in carbohydrates, many of the details concerning interactions with carbohydrates are yet to be uncovered. In particular, we seek to develop a model system that contains sugars fixed in space and orientation to an extended sheet surface that will allow for the probing of sugar-sugar and sugar-conjugate interactions at defined spacings. My larger interest in surfaces containing sugars led me to an interest in bacterial cell walls. These cell walls contain a system of cross-linked sugars and peptides called peptidoglycan whose synthesis is the target of many commonly used antibiotics. A second on-going project studies the proteins that synthesize this peptidoglycan, called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), from the bacterial species Burkholderia cenocepacia. This bacterium is an opportunistic pathogen that is of clinical relevance to Cystic Fibrosis patients. It is of particular interest because it is largely resistant to antibiotics, and utilizes many resistance mechanisms. In my lab, we have identified, cloned, expressed, and isolated several PBPs from this bacterium. We have begun studies to characterize these proteins.

I have a strong interest in working with undergraduate students and many students who have worked in my lab have presented their work at national conferences. I am also interested in the research regarding the best pedagogies for teaching chemistry. This has translated into lab development and classroom strategies that explore techniques current in the literature.

Research: 

Publications

  • Specht, K.M.; *Sheetz, K.; *Alexander, C.A.; *Lamech, L.T.; *O'Connor, L.H.; *Walker, D.M.; and *Stevenson, H.P. 2010. Expression and Characterization of Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Burkholderia cenocepacia. Current Microbiology. v. 60 no. 4 p. 274-279
  • Specht, K.M.; Jackson, M.; *Sunkel, B.; Boucher, M.A. 2010. Synthesis of a functionalized sheet silicate derived from apophyllite and further modification by hydrosilylation. Applied Clay Science. v. 47 p. 212-216
  • Boucher, M.A.; Specht, K.M. 2009. A Forensic-Themed Case Study for the Organic Lab . Journal of Chemical Education. v. 86 no. 7 p. 847-848
  • Fan, Q.-W.; Specht, K.M.; Zhang, C.; Goldenberg, D.D.; Shokat, K.M.; and Weiss, W.A. 2003. Combinatorial Efficacy Achieved Through Two-Point Blockade within a Signaling Pathway - A Chemical Genetic Approach. Cancer Research. v. 63 p. 8930-8938
  • Specht, K.M. and Shokat, K.M. 2002. The Emerging Power of Chemical Genetics. Current Opinion in Cell Biology. v. 14 p. 155-159
  • Specht, K.M.; Nam, J.; Ho, D.M.; Berova, N.; Kondru, R.K.; Beratan, D.N.; Wipf, P.; Pascal Jr., R.A. and Kahne, D.. 2001. Determining Absolute Configuration in Flexible Molecules: A Case Study. Journal of the American Chemical Society. v. 123 no. 37 p. 8961-8966
  • Specht, K.M.; Harris, C.R.; Molander, G.A.; and Kahne, D. 1999. SmI2 Cleavage of Chromomycin A3 Sugars. Tetrahedron Letters. v. 121 p. 1237-1238
  • Domagala, J.M.; Gogliotti, R.; Sanchez, J.P.; Stier, M.A,; Musa, K.; Song, Y.; Loo, J.; Reily, M.; Tummino, P.; Harvey, P.; Hupe, D.; Sharmeen, L.; Mack, D.; Scholten, J.; Saunders, J.; and McQuade, T. 1997. 2,2'-Dithiobisbenzamides and 2-Benzisothiazolones, Two New Classes of Antiretroviral Agents: SAR and Mechanistic Considerations. Drug Design and Discovery. v. 15 p. 49-61
  • Toledo, L.M.; Musa, K.; Lauher, J.W.; Fowler, F.W. 1. Development of Strategies for the Preparation of Designed Solids - An Investigation of the 2-Amino-4(1H)-pyrimidone Ring-System for the Molecular Self-Assembly of Hydrogen-Bonded Alpha-Networks. Chemistry of Materials. v. 7 p. 1639-1647

Presentations

  • Specht, K.M. “Investigating the Cell Wall of Burkholderia cenocepacia” Invited seminar speaker at The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, January, 2012.
  • Specht, K.M. “Antibiotics and Onion Rot: Investigating the Cell Wall of Burkholderia cenocepacia” Invited seminar speaker at John Carroll University, Cleveland, OH, November 2011.
  • Specht, K.M. “A Guided Research Project for the Organic Chemistry Lab.” Presented at the American Chemical Society 240th National Meeting in Boston, MA, August 2010.
  • Boucher, M.A.; Specht, K.M. “Was it murder? Introducing FT-IR through a case study from organic chemistry.” Presented at the 20th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education in Bloomington, IN, July 2008.
  • Specht, K.M. “Exploring Antibiotic Resistance: Identification and Expression of Penicillin-Binding Proteins from Burkholderia cenocepacia” Invited seminar speaker at Colby College, Waterville, ME, April 2008.
  • Boucher, M.A.; Specht, K.M. “Was it murder? A case study for an organic laboratory” Poster Presentation at the American Chemical Society 234th National Meeting in Boston, MA, August 2007.
  • Specht, K.M. “Adventures in Chemical Biology: Cloning and Expression of Penicillin-Binding Proteins” Invited seminar speaker at Utica College, Utica, NY, April 2007.

Student Presentations 

  • *Miyawaki, T.Y.; Specht, K. “Increasing the Permeability of Burkholderia cenocepacia by Inserting Targeted Genomic Mutations” Poster Presentation at the American Chemical Society 245th National Meeting in New Orleans, LA, April 2013.
  • *Weber, L.; Specht, K. “Expression of BCAL0894 in the Outer Membrane of B. cenocepacia and its Linkage to Lipopolysaccharide Presence” Poster Presentation at the American Chemical Society 245th National Meeting in New Orleans, LA, April 2013.
  • *Malik, J.; Specht, K. “Elucidating the Role of BCAL2021 in Burkholderia cenocepacia through Suicide Vector-Induced Gene Knockout” Poster Presentation at the American Chemical Society 241st National Meeting in Anaheim, CA, March 2011.
  • *Alexander, C.M.; *Lamech, L.T.; Specht, K. “Cloning and overexpression of an E. coli PBP1a homolog from Burkholderia cenocepacia into E. coli” Poster Presentation at the American Chemical Society 234th National Meeting in Boston, MA, August 2007.
  • *O’Connor, L.H.; *Lamech, L.T.; Specht, K. “Cloning and overexpression of a putative penicillin-binding protein from Burkholderia cenocepacia in E. coli” Poster Presentation at the American Chemical Society 234th National Meeting in Boston, MA, August 2007.
  • *Stevenson, H.; *Hickey, D.; Specht, K. “Bocillin™ PBP Labeling and Detection Studies” Poster Presentation at the American Chemical Society 232nd National Meeting in San Francisco, CA, September 2006.
  • *Cobb, K.B.; Specht, K.M. “In vivo Monitoring of PBP1b in E. coli” Poster Presentation at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Annual Meeting and Centennial Celebration in San Francisco, CA, April 2006.
  • *Stevenson, H.; Specht, K. “Plasmid design for the fusion of PBP1a with the fluorescent protein GFP” Poster Presentation at the Columbus Section American Chemical Society Meeting in Columbus, OH, November 2005.

* indicates Denison University undergraduate student co-authors

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Phil A. Waite Waite, Philip  A. Waite

Waite, Philip  A. Waite
Staff  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry
Supervisor, Building Stockroom
Ebaugh Laboratories
015
740-587-6650
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