Faculty & Staff

Lauren Araiza dr. Araiza, Lauren A. Araiza

Dr.Araiza, Lauren A. Araiza
Faculty  |  History, Black Studies
Associate Professor
Fellows Hall
427
740-587-8559
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Williams College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
Biography: 

"Dr. Lauren Araiza joined the faculty at Denison in the spring of 2007. She teaches survey courses in African-American history and the U.S. since 1865. She also offers seminars on the Civil Rights Movement, the intellectual history of Black Power, the American West, and comparative social movements. Her other teaching interests include labor history, comparative race and ethnicity, and oral history.

Dr. Araiza's first book, To March for Others: The Black Freedom Struggle and the United Farm Workers, was published in the fall of 2013 by the University of Pennsylvania Press. Her book examines the complexities of multiracial coalition building in Amerian social movements by examining the relationships between the major organizations of the black freedom struggle and the UFW, a union of primarily Mexican American farm workers. Dr. Araiza has also published in the Journal of African American History and has contributed an essay to the edited collection, The Struggle in Black and Brown: African American and Mexican American Relations During the Civil Rights Era (University of Nebraska Press, 2011).

Dr. Araiza received her BA from Williams College and her MA and PhD from the University of California, Berkeley."

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Jerrell Beckham ’96 dr. Beckham, Jerrell Kevin Beckham  ’96

Jerrell Beckham '96
Faculty  |  Black Studies, Education
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
107E
740-587-8543
Service: 
2006-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Denison University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
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Stafford Berry Berry, Stafford C. Berry

Berry, Stafford C. Berry
Faculty  |  Dance, Black Studies
Assistant Professor
Doane Dance Building
106
740-587-6564
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., North Carolina Central University; M.F.A., Choreography from Hollins University
Biography: 

STAFFORD C. BERRY, JR. is the Associate Artistic Director of the African American Dance Ensemble where he toured for 12 years, Managing Director of the Berry & Nance Dance Project, and is on the faculty of the American Dance Festival. He has taught, choreographed, and performed African rooted dance and theatre throughout the United States and the Caribbean. An advocate for the advancement of the arts, he has served on Dance Panels for the North Carolina Arts Council & the Durham Arts Council, and he's served on the Board of Directors for the North Carolina Dance Alliance. Mr. Berry has been a Master Teacher for the National Foundation for the Arts Competition in Miami, Florida. He has performed in works by (Dance) Melvin Purnell, Dennis Wayne, David Dorfman, Assane Konte, Dr. Kariamu Welsh Asante, Dr. Bill Banfield, Penny Bridgers, and Dr. Chuck Davis; (Theatre) Ed Shockley, Zadia Ife and August Wilson.

Originally from Chester, Pennsylvania, Mr. Berry received his formal education in theatre, dance, and music from Temple University & North Carolina Central University, and received his MFA from Hollins University/ADF. He is eternally grateful for the knowledge imparted to him from several masters in the US and in Africa, including Les Ballet Africaines, the National Dance Company of Guinea, West Africa. In 1996, Mr. Berry was certified as a teacher of the Umfundalai Technique and in 1997 was Assistant to the Choreographer for Kariamu & Company, with whom he'd also been a principal dancer for 5 years. In 1992 he co-founded the Seventh Principle Performance Company and in 1997 he co-founded the Berry and Nance Dance Project.

Mr. Berry's choreographer's awards and grants have been numerous. He was awarded the Neumann Cultural Enrichment Grant to create a new work (1994). He received a North Carolina Arts Council Choreographers Fellowship (2000), a Cooper Foundation Grant (2002), two Five County Arts Grants from the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance in PA (2003, 2004), a Ford Foundation Grant to create a new ballet in collaboration with Dr. Chuck Davis (2004) and most recently, an Emerging Artist grant from the Durham Arts Council which will allow him to create new music for a ballet (2008). His work, a combination of dance, theatre and music, can be seen in the archives of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

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Tabitha Chester Chester, Tabitha Chester

Tabitha Chester
Faculty  |  Black Studies, Women’s Studies
Visiting Assistant Professor
740-587-6594
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John Davis Davis, John H. Davis

Faculty  |  Black Studies, East Asian Studies, International Studies, Sociology / Anthropology
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
103F
740-587-5558
Service: 
2011-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University
Biography: 

Assistant Professor John Davis joined the faculty at Denison in the fall of 2011. Prof. Davis is a socio-cultural anthropologist whose work explores the "social life" of rights by critically analyzing the processes by which transnational discourses and practices of human rights intersect with specific national and cultural contexts to shape everyday life. Prof. Davis's dissertation used ethnographic modes of inquiry to illuminate the cultural politics of human rights in Japan through an exploration of how the burakumin minority operationalized the idea of human rights within their movement for social change.

Prof. Davis is currently completing a book manuscript titled "Animating Rights in Japan: The Politics of Buraku Liberation". Prof. Davis has two new research projects underway. The first utilizes the case of burakumin as an opportunity to reconsider theories of race and minority subjectivity. It is at once an attempt to account for the wide-ranging and often conflicting narratives he encountered in Japan about what it meant to be "burakumin" and how his own positionality as an African American in Japan shaped his perspective on the topic. More often than not Prof. Davis became part of the focus of conversations with people as they invoked his status as a kokujin ("Black person") to illustrate points of difference or similarity "the nature of the comparison varied with the speaker" between racial minorities and burakumin. Prof. Davis's second line of research compares how concepts of race and ethnicity factor into genetics research in Japan and the United States respectively.

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Susan E. Diduk dr. Diduk, Susan E. E. Diduk

Faculty  |  Black Studies, International Studies, Women’s Studies, Sociology / Anthropology
Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
101A
740-587-6301
Service: 
1984-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., University College London, U.K.; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University
Biography: 

"My areas of specialization in anthropology include classical and contemporary theory, art and society, gender, political economy and Sub-Saharan Africa. My doctoral dissertation was an historical examination of gender among the Kedjom of the Republic of Cameroon, between female economic contributions and cultural ideologies which demeaned them. More recently, I have done research on the history of European alcohol in West Africa and the impact of transnational brewing corporations on the national and local economies of Cameroon. I am particularly interested in the relationship between rural communities and the African State. Presently, I am exploring indigenous knowledge around agricultural production and the religious significance of twinship in Sub-Saharan Africa."

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Fareeda Griffith dr. Griffith, Fareeda G. Griffith

Dr.Griffith, Fareeda G. Griffith
Faculty  |  Black Studies, Sociology / Anthropology
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
103C
740-587-8560
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Paine College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Biography: 

Fareeda McClinton Griffith, PhD is an assistant professor of Sociology/ Anthropology at Denison University. As a quantitatively trained sociologist and demographer, Dr. Griffith advises students on research projects with interests in quantitative methods, and teaches courses on demographic changes in the continent of Africa, survey research methods and racial and ethnic relations around the globe. She received her B.A. in Sociology with summa cum laude honors from Paine College. She received a M.A. in Demography and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania. Additionally, Dr. Griffith has published on race relations and residential segregation patterns in South Africa and Somali immigrants and health perceptions in Columbus, Ohio. Her work appears in the Southern African Journal of Demography and is forthcoming in Health, Culture, and Society. Dr. Griffith has also received several grants to investigate racial residential segregation and chronic health outcomes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and health perceptions of Somali immigrants in Columbus, OH.

Research: 
  • Griffith, Fareeda M. and Tukufu Zuberi. Forthcoming. “ Demography of Race and Ethnicity in South Africa” in the International Handbook on Race and Ethnicity, Rogelio Saenz, Rodriguez, Nestor; Embrick, David (eds). Handbook 4, Springer Press: New York. Peer reviewed book chapter and invited
  • Francis, Shelley and Kendall A. Leser and Emma E. Esmont and Fareeda Griffith. “An Analysis of Key Stakeholders Attitudes and Beliefs about Barriers and Facilitating Factors in the Development of a Cervical Cancer Prevention Program in South Africa.” African Journal of Reproductive Health. March 2013: 17:1. Peer reviewed article
  • Griffith, Fareeda. " Intercensal Changes in Measures of Residential Segregation Among Population Groups in Gauteng, South Africa, 1996-2001." Southern African Journal of Demography. January 2013: Volume 14:1.  Peer reviewed article
  • Francis, Shelley and Fareeda Griffith and Kendall A. Leser .An Investigation of Somali Women’s Beliefs, Practices, and Attitudes about Health, Health Promoting Behaviors and Cancer Prevention.”  Health, Culture, and Society.  Forthcoming 2014. Peer reviewed article
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John L. Jackson Jackson, John Lindsey L. Jackson

Jackson, John Lindsey L. Jackson
Faculty  |  Religion, Black Studies
Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
209B
740-587-6560
Service: 
1974-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Miles College; M.Div, Harvard Divinity School; Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

John L. Jackson: Director and Associate Professor of Black Studies ( B.S. degree from Miles College; M. Div. Harvard Divinity School; Ph.D. from Ohio State University).Teaches: Introduction to Black Studies; and Black Religion and Black Theology, Rebellion, Resistance and Black Religion.

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Toni King King, Toni C. King

King, Toni C. King
Faculty, Staff, Senior Administration  |  Black Studies, Women’s Studies, Provost's Office
Associate Professor and Associate Provost
Doane Administration
201
740-587-8660
Service: 
1997-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Oklahoma State University; M.A., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University
Biography: 

Human Subjects Review (Denison University Institutional Review Board)

* Diversity Advisory Committee

Posse Liaison to the National Posse Foundation

Faculty Diversity (Recruitment, Hiring, Program Development)

Workshops and Trainings

Personnel Committee

Academic Awards Convocation

Commencement Committee

Working with faculty groups pertaining to diversity ( FOCIF: Faculty of Color/International Faculty Group,
the Black Caucus, Faculty Development Committee, Faculty Orientation Committee, Queer Studies Concentration.)

* The Diversity Advisory Committee Members are: Dosinda Alvite, Warren Hauk, Ching-Chu Hu, John Jackson, Toni King, Christine Pae

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Linda Krumholz dr. Krumholz, Linda J. Krumholz

Linda Krumholz
Faculty  |  English, Black Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor & Chair (Black Studies)
Barney-Davis Hall
207
740-587-5740
Service: 
1992-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Reed College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison
Biography: 

Linda Krumholz is Associate Professor of English and Director of Black Studies. She teaches Twentieth and Twenty-first Century African American, Native American, and Ethnic American literature as well as literary theory and composition. She currently holds the Lorena Woodrow Burke Chair of English.

Krumholz is interested in the ways fiction can transform social representations and beliefs about race, history, economics, power, and cultural identities. Her research focuses on novels by contemporary African American and Native American authors such as Toni Morrison, Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise Erdrich, and Paule Marshall. In her recent work, she also considers how teaching can transform U.S. discourses and contemporary conversations about race. Her essays have appeared in Ariel, Contemporary Literature, African American Review, Modern Fiction Studies, and various anthologies.

Courses Taught:

FYS 101: Autobiography and Identity; FYS 101: Contemporary Identities: Autobiography and Comics (with Ron Abram); FYS 101: Toni Morrison’s Novels
HONORS 167: Twentieth-Century Literary and Performing Arts: Roots in Blues and Jazz (with April Berry)
ENGLISH 202: Introduction to Literary Studies: Literary Theory and Critical Methods
ENGLISH/WOMEN’S STUDIES/QUEER STUDIES 225: Women in Literature
ENGLISH 237: Introduction to Creative Writing
ENGLISH/BLACK STUDIES 255: Ethnic Literature
BLACK STUDIES 235: Introduction to Black Studies
ENGLISH/BLACK STUDIES/WOMEN’S STUDIES 325: African American Women’s Novels
ENGLISH 326: Contemporary Native American Literature
ENGLISH/BLACK STUDIES 355: The Harlem Renaissance
ENGLISH/BLACK STUDIES 356: Narratives of Slavery
ENGLISH 400: Toni Morrison and Black Feminist Theory; ENGLISH 400: Literary Criticism; ENGLISH 400: Race and the American Literary Imagination; ENGLISH 400: From Theory to Fiction: Literary Theory and the Novels of Louise Erdrich and Toni Morrison; ENGLISH 400: Rewriting America: Race, Gender, History, and Power in Toni Morrison’s Novels

Positions Held:

Director of Black Studies (2013-present)
Lorena Woodrow Burke Chair of English (2010-2015)
Co-Chair of the Homestead Advisory Board (2013-present)
Chair of Homestead Advisory Board (2000-2005, 2008-2013)
Chair of the Faculty (2011-2012)
Chair of English (2007-2010)
Co-Chair of MLK Day of Learning Committee (2002-2004)

Research: 

Selected Publications:

  • From Mysteries to Manidoos: Language and Transformation in Louise Erdrich’s The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse.” Western American Literature, forthcoming.
  • Blackness and Art in Toni Morrison’s Tar Baby.” Contemporary Literature 49.2 (Summer 2008): 262-291.
  • Tar is Art: Blackness and the Power of Fiction in Tar Baby.” The Fiction of Toni Morrison: Teaching and Writing on Race, Identity, and Culture. Ed. Jami L. Carlacio. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 2007. 77-84.
  • Reading and Insight in Toni Morrison’s Paradise.” African American Review 36 (2002): 21-34.
  • Native Designs: Silko’s Storyteller and the Reader’s Initiation.” Leslie Marmon Silko: A Collection of Critical Essays. Ed. Louise K. Barnett and James L. Thorson. Albuquerque NM: U of NM Press, 1999. 63-86.
  • Reading in the Dark: Knowledge and Vision in Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon.” Approaches to Teaching the Novels of Toni Morrison. Ed. Nellie Y. McKay and Kathryn Earle. New York: MLA, 1997. 106-112.
  • ‘To Understand This World Differently’: Reading and Subversion in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Storyteller.” Critical Visions: Contemporary North American Native Writing. Ed. Jeanne Perreault and Joseph Bruchac. Ariel 25 (1994): 89-113.
  • Dead Teachers: Rituals of Manhood and Rituals of Reading in Song of Solomon.” Toni Morrison. Ed. Nancy J. Peterson. Modern Fiction Studies 39 (1993): 551-574.
  • The Ghosts of Slavery: Historical Recovery in Toni Morrison’s Beloved.” African American Review 26 (1992): 395-408.
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Diana Mafe Mafe, Diana A. Mafe

Diana Mafe
Faculty  |  English, Black Studies, International Studies, Women’s Studies
Assistant Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
306
740-587-6237
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., McMaster University; M.A., University of Guelph; Ph.D., McMaster University
Biography: 

Diana Adesola Mafe teaches postcolonial literatures with an emphasis on contemporary Anglophone African literatures. She also teaches African American literatures and courses in Women’s Studies. Her work tracks the literary and cinematic roles of and for women of color in African and American discourses. She has published articles in Research in African Literatures, American Drama, English Academy Review, Frontiers, Safundi, Camera Obscura, and African Women Writing Resistance. Her book, Mixed Race Stereotypes in South African and American Literature: Coloring Outside the (Black and White) Lines (Palgrave Macmillan 2013), examines the literary stereotype of the “tragic mulatto” from a transnational perspective.

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Trey Proctor dr. Proctor, Frank Proctor

Trey Proctor
Faculty  |  History, Black Studies, Environmental Studies, Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor
Fellows Hall
404
740-587-5791
Service: 
2005-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of California, Davis; M.A., University of Arizona; Ph.D., Emory University
Biography: 

Frank "Trey" Proctor teaches courses in the history of Latin America and the Atlantic World. His research and teaching interests focus on Mexico, colonial Latin America, and Comparative Slavery.

Proctor’s research focuses on the lived experience of slaves of African descent and master-slave relations in Spanish America.  His first book, “Damned Notions of Liberty”: Slavery, Culture, and Power in Colonial Mexico, 1640-1769 (University of New Mexico Press, 2010) explores those issues in Mexico.  His next book project will explore similar questions from the perspective of the Spanish Empire in an attempt to move away from “national” histories.  His work has appeared in the Hispanic American Historical Review and The Americas and he has contributed chapters to the edited volumes Black Mexico (University of New Mexico, 2009) and Africans to Spanish America (University of Illinois Press, forthcoming).

In 2005, Proctor joined the Denison faculty after teaching at Whitman College in Walla Walla, WA for two years. Professor Proctor earned his BA from University of California at Davis, his MA from the University of Arizona, and his PhD from Emory University.

 

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Vikky Shekha Shekha, Vikky Shekha

Staff  |  Black Studies
Academic Administrative Assistant
Blair Knapp Hall
209
740-587-6594
Service: 
2013-Present
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Mitchell Snay dr. Snay, Mitchell Snay

Mitchell Snay
Faculty  |  History, Black Studies
Professor
Fellows Hall
408
740-587-6599
Service: 
1986-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Brandeis University
Biography: 

Mitchell Snay teaches courses in American history from the colonial period through Reconstruction. These classes include the first half of the introductory survey course in U.S. History, historiographical seminars on Puritan New England and Southern history, and upper level courses on the Jeffersonian, Jacksonian, and Civil War eras.

A Chicago native, Snay was educated at the University of Michigan and Brandeis University, where he received his Ph.D. in the History of American civilization. Before coming to Denison in 1986, Snay was a Lecturer in History and Literature at Harvard University. His research and writing focuses on the political and intellectual history of the United States between 1815 and 1877. He is the author of three books: Gospel of Disunion: Religion and Separatism in the Antebellum South (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), Fenians, Freedmen, and Southern Whites: Race and Nationality in the Era of Reconstruction (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2007), and forthcoming in August 2011 Horace Greeley and the Politics of Reform in Nineteenth-Century America (Rowman & Littlefield). He is also the co-editor of Religion and the Antebellum Debate over Slavery (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1998). Dr. Snay has published numerous articles and reviews on nineteenth-century American history

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Anita Waters Waters, Anita Waters

Waters, Anita Waters
Faculty  |  Black Studies, Sociology / Anthropology
Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
103E
740-587-6572
Service: 
1992-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Mary Washington College; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University
Research: 

My research interests concern the role that socially shared ideas and beliefs play in shaping people’s behavior, especially their political action. In my dissertation research, I explored the question of why politicians in Jamaica chose to use Rastafarian symbols and reggae music in electoral campaigns (Race, Class and Political Symbols, Transaction Press 1985). My second book project was an examination of the way post-colonial Jamaica has revised its historical narratives and a study of heritage tourism development and unofficial community history in Port Royal, Jamaica (Planning the Past, Lexington Books 2006). I have published research articles about conspiracy theories in African-American political culture (in The Journal of Black Studies) the uses that Jamaican politicians make of historical narratives (in Caribbean Quarterly), the way Columbus residents express hostile attitudes toward Somali immigrants (in Bildhaan: A Journal of Somali Studies), and the presentation of revolutionary history in Cuban museums and commemorative events (in the Canadian Journal of Caribbean and Latin American Studies). Recently I have turned my attention to the way Cuba is portrayed in political discourse in the United States.

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