Faculty & Staff

Lauren Araiza dr. Araiza, Lauren A. Araiza

Dr.Araiza, Lauren A. Araiza
Faculty  |  History, Black Studies
Associate Professor
Fellows Hall
427
740-587-8559
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Williams College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
Biography: 

"Dr. Lauren Araiza joined the faculty at Denison in the spring of 2007. She teaches survey courses in African-American history and the U.S. since 1865. She also offers seminars on the Civil Rights Movement, the intellectual history of Black Power, the American West, and comparative social movements. Her other teaching interests include labor history, comparative race and ethnicity, and oral history.

Dr. Araiza's first book, To March for Others: The Black Freedom Struggle and the United Farm Workers, was published in the fall of 2013 by the University of Pennsylvania Press. Her book examines the complexities of multiracial coalition building in Amerian social movements by examining the relationships between the major organizations of the black freedom struggle and the UFW, a union of primarily Mexican American farm workers. Dr. Araiza has also published in the Journal of African American History and has contributed an essay to the edited collection, The Struggle in Black and Brown: African American and Mexican American Relations During the Civil Rights Era (University of Nebraska Press, 2011).

Dr. Araiza received her BA from Williams College and her MA and PhD from the University of California, Berkeley."

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David Bernstein Bernstein, David Bernstein

Faculty  |  History, Environmental Studies
Visiting Assistant Professor
740-587-6251
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Bowdoin College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
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Adam J. Davis Davis, Adam J. J. Davis

Adam J. Davis
Faculty  |  History
Associate Professor & Chair (History)
Fellows Hall
426
740-587-6252
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University
Biography: 

Adam Davis, currently Chair of Denison’s History Department, is a historian of medieval Europe with interests in medieval church reform and religious life, preaching, medieval universities, and the history of charity. He teaches survey courses on late antiquity and medieval Europe, as well as upper-level courses on religion and society in medieval Europe; the Crusades; Jews and Christians in the Middle Ages; the Renaissance/Reformation of the twelfth century; the history of the university; and Renaissance Italy.

Research: 

Dr. Davis's research explores the interplay between medieval ideas and institutions, social values and practices. His first book, The Holy Bureaucrat: Eudes Rigaud and Religious Reform in Thirteenth-Century Normandy (Cornell University Press, 2006), explored the impact of a learned elite on the daily life of the medieval church. The book brought together the intellectual and theological world of the University of Paris with the administrative and moral challenges a Franciscan archbishop faced while trying to reform the French clergy and laity. Dr. Davis is currently working on a book on the rise of the hospital and the formation of a charitable society in 12th and 13th-century Champagne. He has received a year-long Fellowship (2014-15) from the National Endowment for the Humanities to complete this book. His recent publications include an essay on the economic power of a 13th-century hospital, in Center and Periphery: Studies on Power in the Medieval World in Honor of William Chester Jordan (Brill, 2013); a special issue of French Historical Studies he co-edited (with Bertrand Taithe), “Towards a French History of Universal Values: Charity, Human Rights and Humanitarianism” (2011); and an article in the Journal of Medieval History on “Preaching in Thirteenth-Century Hospitals” (2010). He recently completed a cultural history of medieval compassion, forthcoming in an edited collection on The Medieval Culture of Compassion and Its Demise. Dr. Davis has been the recipient of a Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities, a Bourse Chateaubriand (given by the French Embassy), a Robert C. Good Fellowship, as well as grants from the Mellon Foundation and the Lilly Endowment.

Adam Davis received his B.A. from Yale University (1995) and his Ph.D. (2001) from Princeton University. Prior to coming to Denison in 2003, he taught as a Lecturer in the History Department at Yale.

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Catherine L. Dollard ’88 Dollard, Catherine L. L. Dollard  ’88

Catherine L. Dollard '88
Faculty  |  History
Associate Professor
Fellows Hall
405
740-587-6238
Service: 
1996-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Denison University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina
Biography: 

Catherine Dollard is a historian of modern Europe with particular interest in the history of Imperial Germany. She teaches courses on modern Europe, modern Germany, gender history, World War I, Eastern Europe, and Myth & Personality in 19th-century Europe. Professor Dollard’s research engages historical questions related to gender, social movements, cultural identity, and the impact of war upon society. Her first book, The Surplus Woman: Unmarried in Imperial Germany, 1871-1918 (Berghahn, 2009), examines the ways in which anxiety over female marital status served as a central leitmotif in the culture and society of the Kaiserreich.

Dr. Dollard has published articles in German Studies Review, Women's History Review, and Women in Germany.She is currently working on a comparative analysis of the World War I correspondence of German and American soldiers. Dr. Dollard has been the recipient of a Chancellor’s Fellowship and a Renewal Grant from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, a Robert C. Good Fellowship, a Lilly Faculty Foundation Fellowship, and a Mellon Faculty Career Enhancement Grant.

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Barry Keenan Keenan, Barry Keenan

Keenan, Barry Keenan
Faculty  |  History, East Asian Studies
Professor
Fellows Hall
406
740-587-6253
Service: 
1976-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School
Biography: 
Barry Keenan teaches advanced courses on: Post-WWII East Asian history, The Confucian Classics, a 200-level course on Classical China, as well as comprehensive surveys of the sweep of ideas and institutions in: (1) Traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Civilization with attention to the connections of the Khitan, Jurchen, and Mongol states to all three, and (2) in Modern Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese Civilization from 1600 to the present.
Professor Keenan is a specialist on Chinese cultural and social history, and has served with only two other foreigners on the editorial board of China's Education: Research & Review, published in Beijing and is a reviewer for its successor, Frontiers of Education in China. His first book was The Dewey Experiment in China: Educational Reform and Political Power in the Early Republic. Cambridge, Ma.: Harvard University East Asian Research Center, 1977. His second book was Imperial China's Last Classical Academies: Social Change in the Lower Yangzi, 1864-1911. Berkeley: University of California East Asian Institute, 1994. And his third book was Neo-Confucian Self-Cultivation. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2011.
 
His undergraduate training was in Philosophy at Yale University that included a fifth-year diploma from Les Cours de Civilisation Francaise at the Sorbonne, and his Ph.D. is from Claremont Graduate University in History. Among twenty articles and encyclopedia entries he has published was, "Academies (shuyuan) [1800-present]. The Encyclopedia of Modern China. David Pong, Editor in Chief. Detroit: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2009; and he presented a panel paper on, “Economic Markets and Higher Education: Ethical Issues in the United States and China,” at The First Frontiers of Education in China Seminar at East China Normal University in September 2012 in Shanghai.
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Debbie Legg Legg, Deborah E. Legg

Debbie Legg
Staff  |  Classics, Greek, History, Latin
Academic Administrative Assistant
Fellows Hall
411
740-587-6251
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Hannah Weiss Muller Muller Weiss Muller

Hannah Weiss Muller
Faculty  |  History
Assistant Professor (Britain/British Empire)
Fellows Hall
407
740-587-8676
Biography: 
Dr. Hannah Weiss Muller is a historian of Britain and the British Empire with particular interests in the long eighteenth century and the intersections of law, monarchy, identity, and subjecthood.  She teaches survey courses on early modern and modern Britain, the British Empire, Modern Europe, and Britain and South Asia.  Her upper level seminars focus on global wars and revolutions in the eighteenth century, literature of empire, and colonial and postcolonial studies.
 
Dr. Muller’s current book project, provisionally entitled Subjects and Sovereign: Bonds of Belonging in the British Empire, argues that subject status served as an organizing and contested principle of the eighteenth century and that the bond between monarch and subject was integral to the coherence of the British Empire.  She examines particular debates and struggles that surfaced in Grenada, Quebec, Minorca, Gibraltar, and Calcutta to document the range of peoples who shaped the contours of subjecthood and the array of rights that became associated with British subject status.  Her recent article, “The Garrison Revisited: Gibraltar in the Eighteenth Century,” appeared in The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History (2013) and focuses on the profound interdependencies between the garrison at Gibraltar and its surrounding environment.  It revisits the anxieties said to haunt isolated garrison societies and explores the range of interactions between colonial and local populations.  Dr. Muller regularly presents papers and serves as a commentator at national and international conferences.
 

Dr. Muller received her A.B. from Harvard University (2000) and her Ph.D. from Princeton University (2010).  She was a recipient of the ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship in 2009-2010 and was a Golieb Fellow at the New York University School of Law in 2010-2011.  Prior to coming to Dension in spring 2014, she taught as a Lecturer in the Committee on Degrees in History and Literature at Harvard University. 

 

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Nilay Özok-Gündoğan Özok-Gündoğan, Nilay Özok-Gündoğan

Nilay Özok-Gündoğan
Faculty  |  History, International Studies
Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
740-587-6258
Biography: 

Nilay Ozok-Gundogan is a historian of the Modern Middle East with a focus on the late Ottoman Empire. Her research interests include state-making, changing property regimes, and inter-ethnic relations in imperial peripheries. She teaches survey courses on the history of Islamic societies, the Modern Middle East, and the US-Middle East relations as well as upper-level seminars on social movements, ethno-religious conflicts, and cities in modern Middle East.

Dr. Ozok-Gundogan’s current research examines the transformation of the Ottoman state’s frontier administration in Kurdistan province during the Tanzimat (Reorganization) period.

She received her BA and MA from Bosphorus University, Istanbul and her Ph.D. from SUNY Binghamton. In 2011-2012, she was an ACM-Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Cornell College.

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Trey Proctor dr. Proctor, Frank Proctor

Trey Proctor
Faculty  |  History, Black Studies, Environmental Studies, Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor
Fellows Hall
404
740-587-5791
Service: 
2005-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of California, Davis; M.A., University of Arizona; Ph.D., Emory University
Biography: 

Frank "Trey" Proctor teaches courses in the history of Latin America and the Atlantic World. His research and teaching interests focus on Mexico, colonial Latin America, and Comparative Slavery.

Proctor’s research focuses on the lived experience of slaves of African descent and master-slave relations in Spanish America.  His first book, “Damned Notions of Liberty”: Slavery, Culture, and Power in Colonial Mexico, 1640-1769 (University of New Mexico Press, 2010) explores those issues in Mexico.  His next book project will explore similar questions from the perspective of the Spanish Empire in an attempt to move away from “national” histories.  His work has appeared in the Hispanic American Historical Review and The Americas and he has contributed chapters to the edited volumes Black Mexico (University of New Mexico, 2009) and Africans to Spanish America (University of Illinois Press, forthcoming).

In 2005, Proctor joined the Denison faculty after teaching at Whitman College in Walla Walla, WA for two years. Professor Proctor earned his BA from University of California at Davis, his MA from the University of Arizona, and his PhD from Emory University.

 

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Mitchell Snay dr. Snay, Mitchell Snay

Mitchell Snay
Faculty  |  History, Black Studies
Professor
Fellows Hall
408
740-587-6599
Service: 
1986-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Brandeis University
Biography: 

Mitchell Snay teaches courses in American history from the colonial period through Reconstruction. These classes include the first half of the introductory survey course in U.S. History, historiographical seminars on Puritan New England and Southern history, and upper level courses on the Jeffersonian, Jacksonian, and Civil War eras.

A Chicago native, Snay was educated at the University of Michigan and Brandeis University, where he received his Ph.D. in the History of American civilization. Before coming to Denison in 1986, Snay was a Lecturer in History and Literature at Harvard University. His research and writing focuses on the political and intellectual history of the United States between 1815 and 1877. He is the author of three books: Gospel of Disunion: Religion and Separatism in the Antebellum South (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), Fenians, Freedmen, and Southern Whites: Race and Nationality in the Era of Reconstruction (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2007), and forthcoming in August 2011 Horace Greeley and the Politics of Reform in Nineteenth-Century America (Rowman & Littlefield). He is also the co-editor of Religion and the Antebellum Debate over Slavery (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1998). Dr. Snay has published numerous articles and reviews on nineteenth-century American history

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Karen Spierling Spierling, Karen  Spierling

Spierling, Karen  Spierling
Faculty  |  History
Associate Professor
740-587-8677
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison
Biography: 
Karen Spierling joined the Denison faculty in 2010.  She teaches courses on early modern European topics, including the Renaissance and Reformation, the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, riots and revolutions, the era of the great “witch hunts,” and European travelers in their increasingly global contexts.  In her teaching, Dr. Spierling is especially interested in the transformation of religious ideas as they were put into practice, the development of discussions about authority and individual rights, and the complicated dynamics of European expansion and intercultural global exchanges in the early modern period.

Dr. Spierling’s research interests focus on the history of the Reformation, in particular the interplay among religious, social, and political concerns in the development and spread of Reformed (Calvinist) Protestantism. Her first book, Infant Baptism in Reformation Geneva: The Shaping of a Community, 1536–1564 (Ashgate, 2005; paperback–Westminster John Knox, 2009) examined the ways that negotiations among reformers, civic leaders, and church members influenced the Reformed practice of baptism, a fundamental ritual in any Christian society. Her current work focuses on the perpetuation of Protestant-Catholic relations in sixteenth-century Geneva, which was reputed to be the most strictly reformed city in Europe, and on the daily workings of such a “Reformed” society. Her recent publications include: “Putting ‘God’s Honor First’: Truth, Lies, and Servants in Reformation Geneva,”Church History and Religious Culture 92 (2012); “Reformation Understandings of Women, Marriage, and Family,” in David M. Whitford, ed., The T&T Clark Companion to Reformation Theology (London: T&T Clark, 2012); “Putting Order to Disorder: Illegitimate Children, Their Parents and the Consistory in Reformation Geneva,” in Raymond A. Mentzer and Françoise Moreil, eds, Dire l’interdit: the vocabulary of censure and exclusion in the early modern Reformed tradition (Leiden: Brill,

2010); and Defining Community in Early Modern Europe, co-edited with Michael Halvorson (Ashgate, 2008).
 
Dr. Spierling received her B.A. in Renaissance Studies from Yale University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in History from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to coming to Denison, Dr. Spierling was an Associate Professor of History at the University of Louisville and a Visiting Associate Professor at The Ohio State University.

 

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Joanna T. Tague Tague, Joanna T.  T. Tague

Joanna T. Tague
Faculty  |  History, International Studies
Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
740-587-6588
Biography: 

Jo Tague is a historian of Sub-Saharan Africa with particular interests in refugee settlement, international humanitarianism, rural development, and African independence movements. She teaches survey courses on Pre-Colonial Africa and Africa After 1800, as well as upper-level courses on Gender and Africa, Comparative African Liberation Movements, Southern Africa, and 19th and 20th Century Eastern and Central Africa.

Dr. Tague’s research explores the relationship between refugee settlement and rural development in decolonizing Africa. She is currently revising her dissertation, titled “A War to Build the Nation: Mozambican Refugees, Rural Development, and State Sovereignty in Tanzania, 1964-1975,” for publication.

Dr. Tague received her B.A. from George Washington University (1998), her M.A. from Ohio University (2003), and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis (2012). Prior to joining the faculty at Denison in the fall of 2012, she taught courses at California State University, Sacramento, as well as at California State University, Chico.

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Megan Threlkeld dr. Threlkeld, Megan S. Threlkeld

Megan Threlkeld
Faculty  |  History, Women’s Studies
Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
403
740-587-6326
Service: 
2008-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Lawrence University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa
Biography: 
Megan Threlkeld joined the faculty at Denison in the fall of 2008. She regularly teaches courses on the U.S. since the Civil War, U.S. women’s history, and U.S. foreign relations. Her other teaching interests include legal history, progressivism, manifest destiny and U.S. expansion, and international feminism.
 
Her research focuses on U.S. women’s international activism in the first half of the twentieth century. Her book, Promoting Pan America: U.S. Women Internationalists Confront Revolutionary Mexico, is forthcoming from the University of Pennsylvania Press.
 
Dr. Threlkeld earned her M.A. and Ph.D. at the University of Iowa, and her B.A. at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin.
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