Faculty & Staff

Jenny Etz Etz, Jennifer Ann Etz

Jenny Etz
Staff  |  Biology
Academic Administrative Assistant
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
213
740-587-6261
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Warren D. Hauk dr. Hauk, Warren Douglas D. Hauk

Warren D. Hauk
Faculty  |  Biology, Queer Studies
Associate Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
517
740-587-5758
Service: 
1998-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Baylor University; M.A., University of Kansas, Lawrence; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Research: 

Molecular Systematics of the Ophioglossaceae (Adder's Tongue Fern Family)

  • Phylogeny of Ophioglossaceae based on morphological and molecular data
  • Phylogenetic relationships in Botrychium s.s., the moonworts
  • ISSR variation within and among North American species of Sceptridium, the grapeferns, using ISSR markers and DNA sequences
  • Phylogenetic relationships among species of Ophioglossum s.s., the adder's tongue ferns
  • ISSR variation within Florida populations of Cheiroglossa palmata, the hand fern
  • ISSR variation within and between Australian and Hawaiian populations of Ophioglossum (Ophioderma) pendulum, the ribbon fern
  • ISSR variation within populations of Helmithostachys zeylanica

As a plant systematist my main research focus is the fern family Ophioglossaceae, commonly called the adder's tongue ferns. I use both molecular and morphological evidence to infer evolutionary patterns and processes within the family and to establish classifications that reflect evolutionary history. Currently my research focuses mainly on projects in the adder’s tongue half of the family, although I am still involved with research on Sceptridium (the grapeferns) and Botrychium s.s. (the moonworts). I use DNA sequences to examine phylogenetic relationships among species of Ophioglossum s.s. (the adder’s tongue ferns) and to explore within-species variation in Ophioderma pendula (the ribbon fern). Central to nearly all of my research projects is the difficult to define interface between species and populations.

Academic Positions

Associate Professor of Biology, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2004 to present

Assistant Professor of Biology, Department of Biology at Denison University, 1998 - 2004

Postdoctoral Researcher, ex. Department of Political Science at Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO, 1996 - 1998

Teaching

QS 100 - Introduction to Queer Studies

BIOL 150 - Introduction to the Science of Biology

BIOL 202 - Ecology & Evolution

BIOL 320 - Plant Systematics

BIOL 380 - Evolutionary Biology

Publications

  • Hauk, W. D., L. Kennedy, and H. M. Hawke. 2012. A phylogenetic analysis of Botrychium s.s. (Ophioglossaceae): evidence from three plastid DNA sequence datasets. Systematic Botany 37: 320-330.
  • Small, R.B., E.B. Lickey, J. Shaw, and W.D. Hauk. 2005. Amplification of non-coding chloroplast DNA for phylogenetic studies in Lycophytes and Pteridophytes with a comparative example of relative phylogenetic utility from Ophioglossaceae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. no. 36 p. 509-522
  • Hauk, W. D., C. R. Parks, and M.W. Chase. 2003. Phylogenetic studies of Ophioglossaceae: Evidence from rbcL and trnL-F plastid DNA sequences and morphology. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. v. 28 no. 1 p. 131-151
  • Hauk, W. D. and M. S. Barker. 2003. Botrychium lanceolatum subsp. angustisegmentum in Ohio. American Fern Journal. v. 93 no. 2 p. 93-94
  • Harker, M. S. and W. D. Hauk. 2003. An evaluation of Sceptridium dissectum (Ophioglossaceae) with ISSR markers: implications for Sceptridium systematics. American Fern Journal. v. 93 no. 1 p. 1-19
  • Hauk, W.D. A review of the genus Memora (Bignoniaceae). Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden.
  • Hauk, W.D. 2002. Revisions of the genera Potamoganos and Roentgenia (Bignoniaceae). Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden. v. 89 p. 77-87
  • Hauk, W.D. and M.S. Barker. 2000. Larch Mountain, 2000 AFS Foray. Fiddlehead Forum: Bulletin of the American Fern Society. v. 27 no. 5 p. 26-27
  • Hauk, W.D. and C.H. Haufler. 1999. Isozyme variation and species relationships within the moonworts (Botrychium subgenus Botrychium). American Journal of Botany. v. 86 no. 5 p. 614-633
  • Hauk, W.D.. 1999. Four new species of Memora (Bignoniaceae) from South America. Novon. v. 9 no. 1 p. 48-54
  • Hauk, W.D.. 1998. A review of the genus Paragonia (Bignoniaceae). Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden. v. 85 p. 460-474
  • Hauk, W.D. . 1998. A review of the genus Cydista (Bignoniaceae). Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden. v. 85 p. 815-840
  • Hauk, W.D.. 1995. A molecular assessment of species relationships among cryptic species of Botrychium subgenus Botrychium (Ophioglossaceae). American Fern Journal. v. 85 no. 4 p. 375-394
  • Hasebe, M., P.G. Wolf, K.M. Pryer, K. Ueda, M. Ito, R. Sano, G.J. Gastony, J. Yokoyama, J.R. Manhart, N. Murakami, E.R. Crane, C.H. Haufler, and W.D. Hauk. 1995. Fern phylogeny based on rbcL nucleotide sequences. American Fern Journal. v. 85 no. 4 p. 134-181

Abstracts

  • Lee, N., A. Fults-Ganey, and W.D. Hauk. 2013. Phylogenetic relationships among species of Ophioglossum s.s. (Ophioglossaceae). Botany 2013, New Orleans, LA. July 28-31, 2013.
  • Cao, D., and W.D. Hauk. 2011. An ISSR investigation of North American grapefern species (Sceptridium; Ophioglossaceae). International Botanical Congress, Melbourne, Australia. July 23-20, 2011.
  • Coneybeer, M.M., and W.D. Hauk. 2007. An Assessment of Genetic Variation within Cheiroglossa palmata (Ophioglossaceae) Using ISSR-PCR: Implications for Conservation. Botany 2007, Chicago, IL.
  • Hauk, W. D.. 2005. Phylogenetic studies of Ophioglossaceae based on analyses of three plastid DNA data sets and morphology. Botanical Society of America, Botany 2005>.
  • Hauk, W. D., K.B. Gibson, and T.C. Masters. 2004. An evaluation of genetic variation in Sceptridium biternatum and S. lunarioides using ISSR markers. Botanical Society of America, Botany 2004.
  • Hauk, W. D., L. F. Kennedy and H.M. Hawke. 2003. Phylogenetic relationships among species of Botrychium s.s. (Ophioglossaceae) based on three plastid DNA sequence data sets. Botanical Society of America, Botany 2003.
  • Kennedy, L. F., H. M. Hawke, and W. D. Hauk. 2003. A Phylogenetic Analysis of Cryptic Moonwort Species (Botrychium s.s.: Ophioglossaceae) Using rbcL and trnL-F cpDNA Sequences. Midwest Ecology and Evolution Conference of University of Akron.
  • Hauk, W. D. and H. M. Hawke. 2002. Phylogenetic relationships in Botrychium s.s. (Ophioglossaceae) based on rbcL and trnL-F cpDNA sequences. Botanical Society of America, Botany 2002.
  • Hawke, H.M. (W.D. Hauk). 2001. A phylogenetic analysis of cryptic moonwort species (Botrychium s.s.: Ophioglossacae) using rbcL and trnL-F DNA sequences. Ohio Academy of Sciences.
  • Barker, M.S. and W.D. Hauk. 2001. An evaluation of Sceptridium dissectum and S. oneidense (Ophioglossacae) using ISSR markers: implications for Sceptridium species circumscriptions. Botanical Society of America, Botany 2001.
  • Barker, M.S., and W.D. Hauk. 2001. Genetic variation of Sceptridium dissectum (Ophioglossaceae) assessed by ISSR (Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat) markers. The Ohio Journal of Science. v. 101 no. 1 p. 43
  • Hauk, W.D.. 2000. Phylogeny of the Ophioglossaceae based on molecular and morphological characters. American Journal of Botany. v. 87 no. 6 p. 90
  • Farrar, D.R., C.L. Johnson-Groh, and W.D. Hauk. 2000. Biology and conservation of the Ophioglossaceae: A tribute to Warren "Herb" Wagner. American Journal of Botany. v. 87 no. 6 p. 89
  • Barker, M.S. (W.D. Hauk). 2000. Genetic Variation in Botrychium dissectum Sprengel (Ophioglossaceae) Assessed by ISSR (Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat) Markers. The Ohio Journal of Science. v. 100 no. 1 p. A8
  • Barker, M.S. (W.D. Hauk) . 2000. A molecular assessment of infraspecific genetic variation in Draba verna L. using ISSR (Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat) Markers. The Ohio Journal of Science. v. 100 no. 1 p. A37
  • Robie, A.C. and W.D. Hauk. 1999. Evolutionary relationships among species of tropical lianas: assembling a molecular phylogeny of the tribe Bignonieae (Bignoniaceae). The Ohio Journal of Science. v. 99 no. 1 p. A8
  • Hauk, W.D., and S.S. Renner. 1999. Phylogenetic relationships among genera of the liana tribe Bignonieae (Bignoniaceae). Published by the XVI International Botanical Congress, Missouri Botanical Garden Press.
  • Hauk, W.D., L.G. Lohmann, and S.S. Renner. 1997. Indels of the trnL-F intergenic spacer as generic markers in woody tropical lianas (Bignoniaceae tribe Bignonieae). American Journal of Botany. v. 84 no. 6 p. 201
  • Hauk, W.D., C.R. Parks, and M. W. Chase. 1996. A comparison between trnL-F intergenic spacer and rbcL DNA sequence data: an example from Ophioglossaceae. American Journal of Botany. v. 83 no. 6 p. 126
  • Hauk, W.D.. 1994. A molecular assessment of cryptic speciation in Botrychium subgenus Botrychium. American Journal of Botany (supplement). v. 81 no. 6 p. 121
  • Hauk, W.D. and M.W. Chase. 1993. Molecular systematics of the Ophioglossaceae. American Journal of Botany (supplement). v. 80 no. 6 p. 109
  • Hauk, W.D. and M. W. Chase. 1991. Gene sequence systematics of the Ophioglossaceae. American Journal Botany (supplement). v. 78 no. 6 p. 153
  • Hauk, W.D., C.H. Haufler, and P. G. Gegenheimer. 1989. Systematics of the genus Botrychium: the molecular story. American Journal of Botany (supplement). v. 76 no. 6 p. 204
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Ayana Hinton Hinton, Ayana M. Hinton

Ayana Hinton
Faculty  |  Biology
Assistant Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
515/lab520
740-587-6327
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S.E., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Wayne State University School of Medicine
Biography: 

Dr. Hinton teaches Eukaryotic Cell Biology, Cell & Molecular Biology, and other advanced courses in the Biology department.

Academic Positions

Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University , 2010-present

Adjunct Faculty, Department of Science - Biological Science Program at Bunker Hill Community College, Boston, MA, 2009

Research: 

Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA

Post-doctoral Fellow, Laboratory of Dr. Michael Forgac, 2004-2010

Wayne State University

Pre-doctoral student, Laboratory of Dr. Sharon Ackerman, 1999-2004

University of Michigan

Undergraduate Independent Study Research, Laboratory of Dr. Levi Thompson, 1994-1996

Research Focus

Many proteins in the cell are large structures composed of several smaller polypeptides called subunits. These subunits must be properly assembled together to produce a functional protein. A better understanding of how large protein complexes are assembled could lead to new therapeutic targets for the treatment of many diseases including cancer. My research focuses on the assembly and targeting of the Vascuolar H+-ATPase. V-ATPases are essential for acidifying intracellular compartments. Several proteins have been identified that act as assembly factors for the V-ATPase and I am interested in determining how these factors interact with each other and with the V-ATPase to produce a functionally assembled protein. In addition, I am interested in determining what factors are necessary for targeting the V-ATPase to different cellular locations. The V-ATPase is normally found in the membranes of lysosomes, the Golgi Apparatus and vesicles. However, in certain cell types including kidney cells, neurons, and cancer cells, the V-ATPase is found in different cellular locations, including the plasma membrane, and this has functional significance for each type of cell. I am interested in identifying the proteins that interact with V-ATpases to determine their cellular localization.

Publications

  • Hinton A, Sennoune SR, Bond S, Fang M, Reuveni M, Sahagian GG, Jay D, Martinez-Zaguilan R, Forgac M. . 2009. Function of a subunit isoforms of the V-ATPase in pH homeostasis and in vitro invasion of MB231 cells.. J Biol Chem. v. 284 no. 24 p. 16400-8
  • Hinton A, Bond S, and Forgac M.. 2009. V-ATPase functions in normal and disease processes.. Pflugers Arch Eur J Physiol.. v. 457 no. 3 p. 589-98
  • Cipriano DJ, Wang Y, Bond S, Hinton A, Jefferies K, and Forgac M.. 2008. Structure and regulation of the vacuolar ATPases.. Biochem Biohpys Acta.. v. 1777 no. 7-8 p. 599-604
  • Hinton A, Zuiderweg E.R.P, and Ackerman S.H.. 2003. A Purified Subfragment of Yeast Atp11p Retains Full Molecular Chaperone Activity. . J Biol Chem.. v. 278 no. 36 p. 34110-34113
  • Hinton A, Gatti D.L., and Ackerman S.H. . 2004. The Molecular Chaperone, Atp12p, from Homo Sapiens: In Vitro Studies with Purified Wild Type and Mutant (E240K) Proteins.. J Biol Chem.. v. 279 no. 10 p. 9016-9022

Presentations

  • Hinton A. 2009. Role of V-ATPases in Tumor Cell Invasiveness. Colgate University. Hamilton, NY
  • Hinton A. 2008. Role of V-ATPase subunit a isoforms in Tumor Cell Invasion. Tufts University. Boston, MA
  • Hinton A, Sennoune S, Bond S, Martinez-Zaguilan R, and Forgac M . 2009. of V-ATPase a Subunit Isoforms in pH Homeostasis and In Vitro Invasion of Human Breast Cancer Cells. Gordon Conference Session on Molecular and Cellular Bioenergetics. Andover, NH
  • Hinton A, Bond S, and Forgac M. 2008. Role of V-ATPase a Subunit Isoforms in In Vitro Invasion of Human Breast Cancer Cells. IRACDA Conference. Chapel Hill, NC
  • Hinton A, Gatti D, and Ackerman S. 2003. In vitro studies with the molecular chaperones, Atp11p and Atp12p. Gordon Conference Session on Molecular and Cellular Bioenergetics. Meriden, NH

Fellowships

  • Training in Education and Critical Research Skills Fellowship, 2007 – 2010
  • National Research Service Award Minority Fellowship, 2001 – 2004
  • Initiative for Minority Student Development Fellowship, 1999 – 2001
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Rebecca Homan dr. Homan, Rebecca Newcomb Homan

Rebecca Homan
Faculty  |  Biology, Environmental Studies
Associate Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
217/lab 226
740-587-5577
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Wellesley College; Ph.D., Tufts University
Biography: 

Teaching
BIOL 150 - Introduction to the Science of Biology
BIOL 202 - Ecology and Evolution
BIOL 312 - Herpetology
BIOL 370 - Conservation Biology

Research: 

I study the habitat requirements and long-term population trends of pond-breeding amphibians. I am currently working on projects designed to improve our understanding how both adults and juveniles choose among different suitable upland habitats. I also study long-term demographic patterns of several species with the goal of improving our ability to distinguish between natural and human-caused population fluctuations.

Research Papers

  • Homan, R.N., M.A. Atwood, A.J. Dunkle, and S.B. Karr. 2010. Movement orientation by adult and juvenile wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) and American toads (Bufo americanus) over multiple years.. Herpetological Conservation and Biology. v. 5 no. 1 p. 64-72
  • Homan, R.N., C.D. Wright*, G.L. White*, L.F. Michael*, B.S. Slaby*, and S.E. Edwards*. 2008. Multiyear study of the migration orientation of Ambystoma maculatum (Spotted Salamanders) among varying terrestrial habitat. Journal of Herpetology. v. 42 p. 600-607
  • Windmiller, B., R.N. Homan, J. V. Regosin, L. A. Willitts, D. L. Wells and J. M. Reed. 2008. Two Case Studies of Declines in Vernal Pool Breeding Amphibian Populations Following Loss of Adjacent Upland Forest Habitat. Herpetological Conservation: Urban Herpetology . v. 3 p. 41-51
  • Homan, R.N., B. S. Windmiller, and J. M. Reed. 2007. Comparative life histories of two sympatric Ambystoma species at a breeding pond in Massachusetts. Journal of Herpetology. v. 41 p. 401-409
  • Regosin, J.V., B.S. Windmiller, R.N. Homan, and J.M. Reed. 2005. Variation in terrestrial habitat use among four pool-breeding amphibian species and its conservation implications. Journal of Wildlife Management. v. 69 p. 1481-1493
  • Homan, R.N., J.M. Reed, and B.S. Windmiller. 2004. Critical thresholds associated with habitat loss for two vernal pool-breeding amphibians. Ecological Applications. v. 14 p. 1547-1553
  • Homan, R.N., J.M. Reed, and L.M. Romero. 2003. Corticosterone concentrations in free-living spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum). General and Comparative Endocrinology. v. 130 p. 165-171 View [pdf]
  • Homan, R.N., J.V. Regosin, D.M. Rodrigues*, J.M. Reed, B.S. Windmiller, and L.M. Romero. 2003. Impacts of varying habitat quality on the physiological stress of Spotted Salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum). Animal Conservation. v. 6 p. 11-18
  • Homan, R.N., J.M. Reed, and B.S. Windmiller. 2003. Analysis of spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) growth rates based on long-bone growth rings. Journal of Herpetology. v. 37 p. 617-621 View [pdf]

Conference Presentations

  • Homan, R.N. 2012. Fluctuation and Stability: A seven year study of spotted salamander demography and migratory orientations. Ohio Amphibian Research and Conservation Conference.
  • Homan, R.N. 2011. Multiyear demographic study of three co-occurring pond-breeding amphibian species. 96th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America.
  • Rumschlag, S.L*, T. Lan*, and R.N. Homan.  2010.  A pilot study examining the role of conspecific chemical cues affecting juvenile American toad (Bufo americanus) orientation behavior.  95th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America.
  • Homan, R.N., M.A. Atwood*, A. Dunkle*, and S.Karr.*  2009.  Multi-year study of adult and juvenile Wood Frog and American Toad migration orientations.  94th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America.
  • Homan, R.N., C.D. Wright*, L.F. Michael*, and S.A. Edwards*. 2007. Distribution of Ambystoma maculatum among different habitat types surrounding a single breeding pond.  92nd Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America.
  • Homan, R.N., C. D. Wright*, and D. Walker*, 2006. Correlates of location and movement of Spotted Salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) in the breeding pond. Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.
  • Wright, C. D.* and R.N. Homan, 2006. Demographic correlates between upland and wetland usage in Ambystoma maculatum. 115th Annual Meeting of the Ohio Academy of Sciences.
  • Homan, R.N., B.S. Windmiller, and J.M. Reed, 2004. Demographic clues about differences in relative vulnerabilities of two sympatric Ambystoma species. 18th Annual Meeting of the Society for Conservation Biology.
  • Homan, R.N., B.S. Windmiller, and J.M. Reed, 2003. Critical Thresholds Associated with Habitat Loss for Two Vernal Pool-Breeding Amphibians. 17th Annual Meeting of the Society for Conservation Biology.
  • Newcomb Homan, R., B.S. Windmiller, and J.M. Reed, 2001.  Demographic Consequences of Upland Habitat Loss on Two Ambystoma Species in Eastern Massachusetts. 86th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America.

* indicates student coauthor

Senior Research Projects Supervised

  • Robert Stenger ('13) - Spatiotemporal variation in microhabitat characteristics of spotted salamander habitat.
  • Justina Bartling ('13) - First detection of ranavirus in Taylor-Ochs Pond and American toad tadpole susceptibility.
  • Mark Mangus ('12) - Investigating the factors influencing migration orientations of the wood frog.
  • Eric Stachura ('12) - Habitat distributions of four life stages of the spotted salamander in and around a temporary ponds.
  • Tian Lan ('11) -  American toad and spotted salamander juveniles' ability to detect and orient toward conspecific chemical cues.
  • Joe Freundlich ('11) -  Multiyear study of three pond-breeding amphibians in Taylor-Ochs. 
  • Samantha Rumschlag ('10) - Amphibian habitat use: demography at an undisturbed pond and a pilot study for juvenile orientation behavior.
  • Meredith Atwood ('09) - A multiyear survey of amphibian demography and habitat distribution at a vernal pool.
  • Kyle Renaldo ('09) - Continued exploration of local small ponds: Examining amphibian populations and habitat type. 
  • Brian Slaby ('08) - Upland habitat use by a breeding population of Ambystoma maculatum (Spotted Salamanders).
  • Sarah Karr ('08) - An Exploration of the Larval Stage of the Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum).
  • Ashley Dunkle ('08) - Ecological factors influencing dispersal in Rana sylvatica (Wood Frog)
  • Gretchen White ('07) - Third year survey of a breeding population of spotted salamanders and their habitat.
  • Sarah Edwards ('06) - A survey of the migrating breeding population of spotted salamanders at the Taylor-Ochs pond in the Denison University Biological Reserve.
  • Dawn Walker ('06) -  Correlates of upland and wetland habitat use by spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum).
  • Christian Wright ('06) - Demographic correlates between upland and wetland habitat characteristics for a breeding population of Ambystoma maculatum (Spotted Salamander). 
  • Lindsay Michael ('05) - A survey of a breeding population of spotted salamanders and their habitat.

Professional Memberships

  • Society for Conservation Biology
  • Sigma Xi
  • Ecological Society of America
  • American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists
  • Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Clare C. Jen Jen, Clare C. C. Jen

Clare C. Jen
Faculty  |  Women’s Studies, Biology
Assistant Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
319
740-587-8596
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Duke University; Ph.D., University of Maryland College Park
Research: 

Specifically, my interest is in the discursive production of "public health anxieties" and the ways systems of race, nation, and gender frame "risky bodies" and "at-risk bodies." In analyzing the 2002-03 multi-country outbreak of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), I trace a genealogy of SARS scientific progress at primarily cellular and genetic levels which serves as a backdrop for political, regulatory, and popular science discourses. In addition, I am currently interested in "nail salons" as discursively produced sites of "public health anxiety," fear, and contagion.

Broadly, my area of scholarship aims to make connections across terrains of “natures” and “cultures.” Much of the public perceives the biological sciences as wholly residing in the natural world. In other words, the scientific study of the living natural world operates with an objectivity that produces value-free knowledge that is untouched by “culture,” that is without historical, political and economic contexts; scientific knowledge is an unblemished reflection of the natural world. On the hand, there is an analogous and equally troublesome misconception of “women’s studies” as wholly residing in culture, that is operating within a social constructionism that problematically annihilates subjects, objects, and “facts.” While neither of these caricatures does justice to these (inter)disciplines’ intents, they allow us to trace needed connections between feminist critiques and biological inquiries. Feminist science studies aims to examine and embrace dimensions of reality between the social and the material.

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Eric C. Liebl dr. Liebl, Eric Christopher C. Liebl

Eric C. Liebl
Faculty  |  Biology, Neuroscience
Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
415/ lab 424
740-587-6414
Service: 
1994-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
Biography: 

Academic Positions Professor

Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2007 to present

Chair, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2002 to 2007

Associate Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2000 to 2007

Grant Reviewer, Developmental Neurobiology at National Science Foundation, 2001 and 2004

External Reviewer for faculty promotions, ex. Department of Political Science at Pomona College (2007), Kalamazoo College (2001)

Ad Hoc Manuscript Reviewer, ex. Department of Political Science at Genetics, Oncogene

Student-Teacher Referee, Department of Education at Denison University, 2001

Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, 1994 - 2000

Teaching Assistant, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at University of CA-Berkeley

Research: 

Publications

  • Smith, JA and Liebl, EC. 2006. Identification of the Molecular Lesions in Alleles of the Drosophila Abelson Tyrosine Kinase. Drosophila Information Service. v. 88 p. 20-23
  • Forsthoefel, DJ, Liebl, EC, Kolodziej, PA, Seeger, MA. 2005. The Abelson tyrosine kinase, the Trio GEF, and Enabled interact with the Netrin receptor Frazzled in Drosophila. Development. v. 132 p. 1983-1994
  • Liebl EC, Rowe RG, Forsthoefel DJ, Stammler AL, Schmidt ER, Turski M, Seeger MA. 2003. Interactions between the secreted protein Amalgam, Amalgam's transmembrane receptor Neurotactin and the Abelson tyrosine kinase affect axon pathfinding. Development. v. 130 no. 14 p. 3217-3226
  • Liebl EC, DJ Forsthoefel, LS Franco, SH Sample, JE Hess, JA Cowger, MP Chandler, AM Shupert and MA Seeger. 2000. Dosage-sensitive, reciprocal genetic interactions between the Abl tyrosine kinase and the putative GEF trio reveal trio's role in axon pathfinding. Neuron. v. 26 p. 107-118
  • Liebl EC. 1999. Molecular Characterization of the Insertion Site in Eight P-Insertion Lines from the Kiss Collection. Drosophila Information Service. v. 82 p. 79-81
  • Liebl, EC, DJ Forsthofel, ER Schmidt, M Turski, KB Markham and MA Seeger. Mutational analysis of amalgam provides insights into Abl-dependent, Neurotactin-mediated adhesion and axon pathfinding in Drosophila. Genetics.
  • Hu, W-L, G Minihan, GR Buckles, H Hayter, EC Liebl, M-C Ramel and FN Katz. 2002. Dachs encodes an unconventional myosin that is required for segmentation and morphogenesis during limb development in Drosophila. Developmental Biology.
  • Liebl EC, DJ Forsthoefel, LS Franco, SH Sample, JE Hess, JA Cowger, MP Chandler, AM Shupert and MA Seeger. 2000. Dosage-sensitive, reciprocal genetic interactions between the Abl tyrosine kinase and the putative GEF trio reveal trio's role in axon pathfinding. Neuron. v. 26 p. 107-118
  • Liebl EC. 1999. Molecular Characterization of the Insertion Site in Eight P-Insertion Lines from the Kiss Collection. Drosophila Information Service. v. 82 p. 79-81
  • Liebl EC. 1998. Testing for mutagens using fruit flies. The American Biology Teacher. v. 60 p. 1-5
  • Comer AR, EC Liebl and FM Hoffmann. 1995. Can clues to the molecular defects in chronic myelogenous leukemia come from genetic studies on the Abelson tyrosine kinase in fruit flies?. The Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine. v. 125 p. 686-691
  • Gertler FB, AR Comer, JL Juang, SM Ahern, MJ Clark, EC Liebl and FM Hoffmann. 1995. enabled, a dosage-sensitive suppresser of mutations in the Drosophila Abl tyrosine kinase, encodes an Abl substrate with SH3-domain binding properties. Genes and Development. v. 9 p. 521-533
  • Liebl EC and FM Hoffmann. 1994. Growth factors and signal transduction in Drosophila. M. Nilsen-Hamilton, ed., Growth Factors and Signal Transduction in Development. p. 165-174
  • Liebl EC, LJ England and GS Martin. 1993. Reactivation of host-dependent src kinase activity by coexpression with a heterologous tyrosine kinase. Virology. v. 195 p. 265-267
  • Liebl EC, LJ England, JE DeClue and GS Martin. 1992. Host range mutants of v-src: Alterations in kinase activity and substrate interactions. J. Virol. v. 66 p. 4315-4324
  • Liebl EC and GS Martin. 1992. Intracellular targeting of pp60src expression: Localization to adhesion plaques is sufficient to transform chicken embryo fibroblasts. Oncogene. v. 7 p. 2417-2428
  • Young JC, EC Liebl and GS Martin. 1998. A host-dependent temperature sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus: Evidence for host factors affecting transformation. Virology. v. 166 p. 561-572
  • Pai JK, EC Liebl, CS Tettenborn, FI Ikegwuonu and GC Mueller. 1987. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate activates the synthesis of phosphatidylethanol in animal cells exposed to ethanol. Carcinogenesis. v. 8 p. 173-178

Presentations

  • Liebl EC, CL Baldyga, LL Bickle, A Bishop, KE Dean, M Kopeke, RR Manohar, JR McCall, J McCroskey, JA Smith, MA Seeger. 2007. A screen for dominant enhancers of a trio mutant phenotype. 48th Annual Drosophila Research Conference. Philadelphia, PA
  • Liebl EC, CL Baldyga, LL Bickle, M Kopeke, RR Manohar, JR McCall, JA Smith, MA Seeger. 2005. A screen for dominant enhancers of a trio mutant phenotype. Cold Spring Harbor Meeting on Neurobiology of Drosophila. Cold Spring Harbor, NY
  • Liebl, EC, RG Roew, DJ Forsthoefel, AM Stammler, MA Seeger. 2003. Identification of neurotactin as a dominant enchancer of the Abelson tyrosine kinase mutant phenotype. 44th Annual Drosophila Research Conference. Chicago, IL
  • Liebl, EC. 2003. Amalgam functions as a dominant enhancer of the Abl mutant phenotype . Science Lecture Series. Ohio Wesleyan University, OH
  • Liebl, EC., ER Schmidt, DJ Forsthoefel, SC Howard, MA Seeger. 2001. Identification of amalgam as a dominant enhancer of the Abelson tyrosine kinase phenotype. 42nd Annual Drosophila Research Conference. Washington, DC
  • Liebl EC. 2001. Gaining insights into axonal pathfinding: combining genetics and cell biology nto an interesting amalgam. Kenyon College Biology Lecture Series. Gambier, OH
  • Forsthoefel DJ, ER Schmidt, S Howard, MA Seeger, EC Liebl. 2000. Trio, a cytoplasmic GEF, and Amalgam, a secreted member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, exhibit dosage-sensitive genetic interactions with the Abelson tyrosine kinase and function in Drosophila axon guidance pathways. Axon Guidance & Neural Plasticity Meeting. Cold Spring Harbor, NY
  • Liebl EC. 1999. Signal transduction in the developing CNS: Reciprocal genetic interactions between the Abl tyrosine kinase and a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor. Ohio State Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology Seminar Series. Columbus, OH
  • Korn JM* and EC Liebl. 1999. Isolating Dominant Enhancers of the two-thirds-trio Mutant Phenotype. Genetics Society of America's Midwest Drosophila Conference. Allerton Park, IL
  • Schmidt E, SC Howard R Perala, EC Liebl. 1999. Fine Mapping of the M109 Gene. Genetics Society of America's Midwest Drosophila Conference. Allerton Park, IL
  • Liebl EC, DJ Forsthoefel, SH Sample, LS Franco, JE Hess, MP Chandler, JA Cowger, AM Jackson, MA Seeger. 1999. Dosage-Sensitive Interactions Between two-thirds-trio, a Putative Guanine-Nucleotide-Exchange Factor, the Abl Tyrosine Kinase, enabled and failed-axon-connections. Cold Spring Harbor Meeting on Neurobiology of Drosophila. Cold Spring Harbor, NY
  • Liebl EC, SH Sample, LS Franco, JE Hess, JA Cowger, AM Jackson, DJ Forsthoefel, MA Seeger. 1999. Dosage-Sensitive, Reciprocal Genetic Interactions Between a Putative Guanine-Nucleotide-Exchange Factor and the Abl Tyrosine Kinase. Fifteenth Annual Meeting on Oncogenes and Tumor Supressors: Signal Transduction and Cell Cycle Regulation in Cancer. Fredrick, MD
  • Liebl EC. 1998. These Nobels Were Dynamite: Using the Genius of Morgan, McClintock and Mullis to Clone a Gene. Biology Symposium. The College of Wooster, OH
  • Liebl EC. 1998. The Last of the Positional Cloners. I-71 Cellular and Molecular. Kenyon College, OH
  • Liebl EC, JE Hess, FM Hoffmann. 1997. haracterization of M89: A Gene Redundant to the Abl Tyrosine Kinase. netics Society of America's Midwest Drosophila Conference. Allerton Park, IL
  • Liebl EC and T Schuh. 1996. Using Xenopus and Drosophila in Your Developmental Biology Lab - A Practical Guide. 55th Annual Society for Developmental Biology Symposium. Nashville, TN
  • Liebl EC. Tubby Flies. 1995. CNS Axons and Leukemia: Using Genetics to Unravel a Biological Problem. Denison Scientific Association. Granville, OH
  • FB, AR Comer, J-L Juang, SM Ahern, MJ Clark, EC Liebl, FM Hoffmann. 1995. enabled, a Suppresser of Mutations in the Drosophila Abl Tyrosine Kinase, Encodes an Abl Substrate with SH3-domain Binding Properties. 54th Annual Society for Developmental Biology Symposium. San Diego, CA
  • Liebl EC, FB Gertler, FM Hoffmann. 1994. Interactions with dachs May Link Abl Tyrosine Kinase-Mediated Signal Transduction with Cellular Adhesion. 53rd Annual Society for Developmental Biology Symposium. Madison, WI
  • Liebl EC, FB Gertler, FM Hoffmann. 1994. Genetic Interactions with dachs May Serve to Link Abl Tyrosine Kinase-Mediated Signal Transduction with Cellular Adhesion. 35th Annual Drosphila Research Conference. Chicago, IL
  • Liebl EC, FB Gertler, KK Hill, FM Hoffmann. 1993. Genetic Modifiers of the abl Mutant Phenotype. 9th Annual Meeting on Oncogenes. Fredrick, MD
  • Liebl EC, KK Hill, FB Gertler, FM Hoffmann. 1993. Second Site Suppressors of the abl Mutant Phenotype. 34th Annual Drosophila Research Conference. San Diego, CA
  • Liebl EC, KK Hill, FB Gertler, MJ Clark, M Visalli, FM Hoffmann. 1992. Identification of Second Site Modifiers of the abl Mutant Phenotype. 33rd Annual Drosophila Research Conference. Philadelphia, PA
  • Liebl EC, LJ England, GS Martin. 1990. Insertion/Deletion Mutagenesis of v-src: Effects on Intracellular Location and Protein-Tyrosine Phosphorylation. Sixth Annual Meeting on Oncogenes. Fredrick, MD
  • Liebl EC, LJ England, JE DeClue, GS Martin. 1989. Intracellular Localization of v-src: Effects on Fibroblast Transformation.. Fifth Annual Meeting on Oncogenes. Fredrick, MD
  • Liebl EC and J Pai. 1986. Phorbol Esters Induce the Synthesis of Phosphatidyl Alchohols, a Unique Class of Phospholipids. McArdle Chemical Carcinogenesis Seminar. Madison, WI
  • Liebl EC, K.E. Dean, A.R. Fields, M. J Geer, E.C. King, B. T. Lynch, K.C. Palozola, E.M. Steenkiste, Y. Zhang. 2012. Characterizing M9.17, a strong dominant enhancer of the trio mutant phenotype. . Given at the 71st Annual Meeting of the Society for Developmental Biology. Montreal, Canada,
  • Liebl EC, A.R. Fields, M. J Geer, L.J. Korbel, B. T. Lynch, K.C. Palozola. 2011. Characterizing M9.17, a strong dominant enhancer of the trio and abl mutant phenotypes.. Given at the 53rd Annual Drosophila Research Conference. San Diego , CA
  • Liebl EC, M. J Geer, B. T. Lynch, K.C. Palozola. 2010. Characterizing dominant enhancers of a trio mutant phenotype.. Given at the 52nd Annual Drosophila Research Conference. Washington , DC
  • Palozola KC, O. Uguru, K.E. Dean, R.R. Manohar, J.R. McCall, J.A. Smith and E.C. Liebl . 2008. Dissecting signal transduction networks involving the Abl tyrosine kinase and the Trio guanine nucleotide exchange factor.. Given at the first annual McArdle Laboratory Research Symposium. Madison , WI
  • Liebl EC. 2008. Dosage-sensitive genetic interaction affecting axon guidance.. Given to the University of Toledo Biology Department. Toledo , OH

Honors and Awards

  • Richard Lucier Endowed Professorship in recognition of outstanding teaching and scholarship. August 2007 - present
  • National Institutes of Health Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) Grant, "Understanding Trio and Abl in Drosophila Axon Guidance Through Genetic Modifiers" (PI; 1R15HD059924-01); $196,312; 8/2009 to 8/2012.
  • Denison University Research Foundation Award, “A Systematic Search for Genetic Interactions Affecting Nervous System Development Involving the Abl Kinase and the Trio Guanine-Nucleotide-Exchange Factor”, $10,967, 2008-2009
  • Participant in the Faculty Summer Institute on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of the Human Genonome Project sponsored by the Dartmouth College Institute for the Study of Applied and Professional Ethics. June, 2004 at Howard University, Washington D.C.
  • National Science Foundation Grant, "Investigation of the integrated roles of Abl, Trio, and Neurotactin in axon outgrowth" (co-PI; NSF 0344053); $240,000; 2004-2007
  • R. C. Good Fellowship, Denison University, 2001
  • National Science Foundation Grant, "Genetic and Cell Biological Characterization of Trio and Amalgam: Two New Enhancers of Abl" (co-PI); $341,752; 2001-2004
  • Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Collaboration with Technology Grant (PI); $21,216 2000-2001
  • Faculty Professional Development Award, Denison University, 2000
  • Denison University Research Foundation Award, "Fine Mapping and Cloning of the Fruit Fly M109 Gene", $3,534, 1999-2000
  • Faculty Professional Development Award, Denison University, 1999
  • Junior Faculty Fellowship, Denison University, 1998
  • National Institutes of Health Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) Grant, "Probing Drosophila Abelson Tyrosine Kinase with Genetics" (PI); $98,182; 1996-2000.
  • Faculty Professional Development Award, Denison University, 1995
  • Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Cancer Research Postdoctoral Fellowship, 1991-1994
  • Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor, University of California, 1988
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship Honorable Mention, 1987
  • Regents Fellowship, University of California, 1986
  • Honors Degree in Molecular Biology, University of Wisconsin, 1985
  • Trewartha Honors Undergraduate Research Grant, University of Wisconsin, 1984

Senior Thesis Advised

  • Localizing dominant enhancers of the trio mutant phenotype and structure/function assays of Neurotactin. Kathryn Elizabeth Dean, 2007*
  • Tyrosine phosphorylation of Trio by Abelson tyrosine kinase. Andrew Justin Bishop, 2007*
  • An investigation of axon pathfinding in the central nervous system of Drosophila through the molecular and genetic characterization of dominant enhancers of the trio mutant phenotype. Jenna Susanne McCroskey, 2007*
  • Investigating Neurotactin and localizing the dominant enhancers of the trio mutant phenotype. Rohan Raoul Manohar, 2006*
  • Study on Neurotactin and dominant enhancers of the trio mutant phenotype. Lindsay Lee Bickel, 2006*
  • Identification of protein:protein interactions of the intracellular domain of Neurotactin by biopanning of a phage display cDNA library. Timothy Ryan Heacock, 2004*
  • Axon pathfinding in the central nervous system of D. melanogaster: Determining enhancers of the trio mutantphenotype from a random mutagenesis screen. Morgan Rebecca Koepke, 2004*
  • Interactions with Nrt: A yeast two-hybrid assay. Brant Lloyd Eutzy, 2003*
  • Amalgam and neurotactin are dosage-sensitive genetic modifiers of the Abl tyrosine kinase mutant phenotype. R. Grant Rowe, 2003*
  • The development of the central nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster: Potential interactions with Trio and Neurotactin. Kara Beth Markham, 2001*
  • Localization and characterization of the M109 mutation: A new allele of the Drosophila amalgam gene. Erica R. Schmidt, 2000*
  • Isolation of enhancers of the trio mutant phenotype. Jay Korn, 2000
  • Testing the effectiveness of two cryoprotectants (glycerol and ethylene glycol) and two freezing methods (dry ice block freezing and controlled rate freezing) in the cryopreservation of domestic felid spermatozoa. Katherine A. Beltaire, 1999*
  • M89: Transposon mutagenesis and recombination with fax. Lara S. Franco, 1999
  • Mycobacteriophage L5: Investigation of the integration complex and further characterization of the mIHF binding site. J. Michelle Kahlenberg, 1998*
  • Generation and characterization of gamma-ray generated M89 alleles. Matthew P. Chandler, 1998
  • Fine localization and characterization of the M89 gene in Drosophila melanogaster. Jon E. Hess, 1998*
  • Deficiency and meiotic recombinant mapping of the Drosophila Abl interacting gene M109. N. Reid Perala, 1998*
  • Genetic experiments exploring the Abl:Disabled genetic interaction. James Pavelka, 1997.
  • The search for a suppressor of the enabled mutant phenotype. Jason A. Hoppe, 1997.
  • The mapping and characterization of the M89 mutation in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. Jennifer A. Cowger, 1997*
  • Using Drosophila genetics to study signal transduction by the Abl tyrosine kinase. Susan C. Howard, 1996*
  • The mapping and characterization of the M89 mutation in Drosophila. Angela M. Jackson, 1996*
  • Detection of a polymorphic microsatellite in the 21-hydroxylase gene region of the horse. Jennifer J. Carlisle, 1995*

* Denotes an honors thesis

Show Profile

Andy McCall McCall, Andrew Christopher McCall

Andy McCall
Faculty  |  Biology, Environmental Studies
Associate Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
317/lab 521
740-587-8554
Service: 
2006-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Carleton College; M.S., Ph.D., University of California, Davis
Biography: 

I'm a plant evolutionary ecologist with special interests in pollination biology and plant-herbivore interactions. I also am interested in how insect phenology is affected by climate change. I am a big fan of field work and have study sites in Ohio, Arizona, and California. During the Ohio winters, I use manipulative experiments in the greenhouse to answer some of my questions (especially # 2 below).

Research: 

My current research questions are:

  1. Does variability in herbivore pressure over time affect the evolution of induced resistance in wild radish?
  2. How and why do florivores (things that eat flowers) choose what flowers to eat?
  3. How does florivory affect pollination and fitness in sacred Datura, Datura wrightii, in Arizona?
  4. What factors are affecting butterfly species richness and diversity in Northern California?

Recent publications

  • McCall, A.C., J.A. Fordyce. 2010. Can optimal defense theory be used to predict the distribution of plant chemical defenses? Journal of Ecology 98: 985-992.
  • McCall, A.C. 2010. Does dose-dependent petal damage affect pollen limitation in a California annual plant? Botany 88: 601-606.
  • Forister, M.L., A.C. McCall, N. J. Sanders, J. A. Fordyce, J.H. Thorne, J. O’Brien, D.P. Waetjen, and A.M. Shapiro. 2010. Thirty years of climate change and habitat alteration shift patterns of butterfly diversity. Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, USA 107: 2088-2092.
  • McCall, A.C. 2008. Florivory affects pollinator visitation and female fitness in Nemophila menziesii. Oecologia 155: 729-737.
  • Past and current lab members (Senior theses titles are given when appropriate):
  • Monique Brown, 2009, worked on how and if past herbivory affects resistance in wild radish
  • Josh Drizin, 2009, worked on pollination biology in Echinacea angustifolia
  • Stephen Murphy, 2009, Thesis: “The effects of induction on petal palatability in radish”
  • Jameson Pfeil, 2009, worked on pollination and seed predation in Echinacea angustifolia
  • Colin Venner, 2009, Thesis: “How does pollinator activity affect fitness in Echinacea angustifolia?
  • Heather Robertson, 2010, Thesis: “Does petal color affect florivores in wild radish?”
  • Caitlin Splawski, 2010, Thesis: “Plant recruitment in a restored prairie in Ohio”
  • Luke Avery, 2011, working on why butterfly communities change over time in California
  • Grant Adams, 2011, Thesis: “Does variation in herbivore pressure affect the evolution of inducible resistance in wild radish?”
  • Kelsy Espy, 2011, Thesis: “Does leaf damage induce resistance in wild radish flowers?”
  • Brian Jackson, 2011, Thesis: “How do abiotic factors affect succession on Mt. St. Helens?”
  • Eric Thomson, 2011, Thesis: “Floral visitors and florivory in Datura wrightii
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Jenna Monroy Monroy, Jenna Monroy

Jenna Monroy
Faculty  |  Biology, Neuroscience
Assistant Professor, Comparative Physiologist
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
321 / lab 320
740-587-6569
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Jessica E. Rettig dr. Rettig, Jessica E. Rettig

Jessica E. Rettig
Faculty  |  Biology
Associate Professor and Henry Chisholm Chair in the Natural Sciences, Aquatic Ecologist
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
513/lab 502
740-587-5618
Service: 
2000-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Earlham College; Ph.D., Michigan State University
Biography: 
  • Academic Positions Associate Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2006 - present
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2000 - 2006
  • Assistant Professor, Biology Department at William Jewell College, Liberty, MO, 1997 - 2000
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, Biology Department at Earlham College, Richmond, IN, 1996 - 1997
Research: 

I am interested in understanding the interactions between different life stages of an organism (e.g., larva, juveniles, adults) and how these interactions, such as competition or predation, affect population dynamics. In addition I exmaine the effects that each life stage has on the community in which it lives and the overall role the species plays in a community. I am an aquatic ecologist and to address these issues I use bluegill sunfish, a common fish in local lakes and ponds. Bluegill have four distinct life stages: egg, larval, juvenile, and adult. My research examines the interactions between larval and adult bluegill and the effects of larvae on their prey community (zooplankton, tiny crustaceans). I use a combination of field surveys and experiments to understand the factors that affect larval growth and survival, such as food availability (i.e., zooplankton), competition, or predation by invertebrates, and how adult bluegill may influence these factors, for instance by consuming animals that typically prey on larvae.

I routinely have students working in my lab, either assisting me or working on their own research projects.

Current Research

  • Tracking the abundance and species composition of zooplankton and macroinvertebrates through time in two Ohio ponds. Zooplankton and macroinvertebrates serve as food for larval and adult bluegill.
  • Comparing diets of adult and larval bluegill to look for evidence of competition for zooplankton prey or evidence for adult consumption of larval predators.
  • Estimating biomass of certain macroinvertebrates through length-mass regression analysis.
  • Determining spawning patterns for adult bluegill in Middleton and Ebaugh ponds. How does timing of reproduction relate to larval success?

Publications

  • Dibble, C.J.*, J.E. Kauffman*, E.M. Zuzik*, G.R. Smith, and J.E. Rettig. MS. Effects of potential predator and competitor cues and sibship on wood frog (Rana sylvatica) embryos. Amphibia-Reptilia. p. in press
  • Rettig, J.E. and G.R. Smith. MS. Class research projects in ecology courses: Methods to un-"can" the experience. Journal of College Science Teaching. p. In press
  • Russo, G.*, A. Chou*, J.E. Rettig, and G.R. Smith. 2008. Foraging responses of mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) to items of different sizes and colors. Journal of Freshwater Ecology. v. 23 p. 677-678
  • Smith, G.R., J.B. Iverson, and J.E. Rettig. 2006. Changes in a turtle community from a northern Indiana lake: a long-term study. Journal of Herpetology. v. 40 p. 150-185
  • Rettig, J.E, L.S. Schuman*, and J.K. McCloskey*. 2006. Seasonal patterns of abundance: do zooplankton in small ponds do the same thing every spring-summer?. Hydrobiologia. v. 556 p. 193-207
  • Michajliczenko, A.H.*, G.R. Smith, and J.E. Rettig. 2004. Effect of diet on bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) tadpole growth and development. Bulletin of the Maryland Herpetological Society. v. 40 p. 42-46
  • Johnson, L.D.*, G.R. Smith, and J.E. Rettig. 2004. Summer activity of small snakes in four habitats in northwestern Missouri. Bulletin of the Maryland Herpetological Society. v. 40 p. 47-52
  • Garvey, J.E., J.E. Rettig, R.A. Stein, D.M. Lodge, and S.P. Klosiewski. 2003. Scale-dependent associations among fish predation, littoral habitat, and distributions of crayfish species. Ecology . v. 84 p. 3339-3348
  • Taylor, M.*, J.E. Rettig, and G.R. Smith. 2003. Diet of re-introduced river otters, Lontra canadensis, in north-central Arizona. Journal of Freshwater Ecology. v. 18 p. 337-338
  • Rettig, J.E. 2003. Rettig, J.E. 2003. Zooplankton responses to predation by larval bluegill: an enclosure experiment. Freshwater Biology. v. 48 p. 636-648
  • Smith, G.R., A. Todd*, J.E. Rettig, & F. Nelson*. 2003. Microhabitat selection by northern cricket frogs, Acris crepitans, along a west-central Missouri creek: Field and experimental observations. Journal of Herpetology. no. 37 p. 383-385
  • Rettig, J.E. and G.G. Mittelbach. 2002. Interactions between adult and larval bluegill sunfish: positive and negative effects. Oecologia. v. 130 p. 222-230
  • Golden*, D.R., G.R. Smith, and J.E. Rettig. 2001. Effects of age and group size on habitat selection and activity levels of Rana pipiens tadpoles. Herpetological Journal. v. 11 p. 69-73
  • Smith, G.R., M.A. Waters*, and J.E. Rettig. 2000. Consequences of embryonic UV-B exposure on the growth and development of plains leopard frog tadpoles (Rana blairi). Conservation Biology. v. 14 p. 1903-1907
  • Smith, G.R., J.E. Rettig, A.M. Frahm, and P.W. Gabrielson. 2000. Prediction Generation and Testing: An Exercise Using Plant Distributions. Bioscene: Journal of College Biology Teaching. v. 26 no. 3 p. 19-21
  • Golden*, D., G.R. Smith, and J.E. Rettig. 2000. Effects of age and group size on habitat selection and activity levels of Xenopus laevis tadpoles. Transactions of the Nebraska Academy of Science. v. 26 p. 23-27
  • Smith, G.R., J.A. Dilts, P.W. Gabrielson, D.P. Heruth, J.E. Rettig, and A.F. Strautman. 1999. Using laptops in the biology classroom and laboratory. Bioscene: Journal of College Biology Teachinh. v. 25 p. 11-12
  • Smith, G.R., J. E. Rettig, G.G. Mittelbach, J.L. Valiulis*, and S.R. Schaack*. 1999. The effects of fish on assemblages of amphibians in ponds: a field experiment. Freshwater Biology. v. 41 p. 829-837
  • Smith, G.R. and J.E. Rettig. 1998. Observations on egg masses of the American toad (Bufo americanus). Herpetological Natural History. v. 6 p. 61-64
  • Rettig, J.E. . 1998. Variation in species composition of larval assemblages: using electrophoresis to identify larval sunfish. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society. v. 127 p. 661-668
  • Rettig, J.E., R.C. Fuller, A.L. Corbett, and T. Getty. 1997. Fluctuating asymmetry indicates levels of competition in an even-aged poplar clone. 80. p. 123-127
  • Smith, G.R. and J.E. Rettig. 1996. Effectiveness of aquatic funnel traps for sampling amphibian larvae. Herpetological Review. v. 27 p. 190-191
  • Mittelbach, G.G., A.M. Turner, D.J. Hall, J.E. Rettig, and C.W. Osenberg. 1995. Perturbation and resilience: a long-term, whole-lake study of predator extinction and reintroduction. Ecology. v. 76 p. 2347-2360

Presentations

  • Rettig, J.E., N.R.Gray*, W.J. Kim*, A. Ali*, J.J. Arrington*, and E. Ubagharaji*. 2008. The nesting environment for bluegill in small ponds: Is there variation in seasonal nesting activity, colony activity, or nest characteristics?. Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference. Columbus, OH
  • Dibble, C.J.*, J.E. Rettig, and G.R. Smith. 2008. Relative strength of top-down and bottom-up effects in a simple aquatic food web that includes an invasive fish. Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America. Milwaukee, WI
  • Rettig, J.E. and G.R. Smith. 2008. Double duty courses: Using an ecology course to fulfill a general education requirement for oral communication. Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America. Milwaukee, WI
  • Rettig, J.E., N.R. Gray*, W.J. Kim*, A. Ali*, J.J. Arrington*, and E. Ubagharaji*. 2008. The nesting environment for bluegill in small ponds: Is there variation in seasonal nesting activity, colony activity, or nest characteristics?. Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America. Milwaukee, WI
  • Smith, G.R., C.J. Dibble*, and J.E. Rettig. 2008. Small fish, big effects: The impacts of mosquitofish and ammonium nitrate on tadpoles, zooplankton, and phytoplankton. Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America. Milwaukee, WI
  • Rettig, J.E. and G.R. Smith. 2008. Class research projects in ecology courses: Methods to un-"can" the experience. Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America. Memphis, TN
  • Rettig, J.E., J.K. McCloskey*, T.E .Waggoner*, and M.M. Tribue*. 2004. Patterns of temporal variation for zooplankton and larval fish in two Ohio ponds. Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society. Madison, W
  • Rettig, J.E., L.S. Schuman*, and J.K. McCloskey*. 2004. Seasonal patterns of abundance: Do zooplankton in small ponds do the same thing every summer?. Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America. Portland, O
  • Rettig, J.E.. 200. Investigating interactions between larval and adult bluegill and their zooplankton prey. Invited research seminar at The Ohio State University.
  • Smith, G.R., J.E. Rettig, and H.A. Dingfelder*. 2003. Stressor effects on amphibian larval communities: Integrated experiments on the effects of nitrate. Annual Year-end Workshop of the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative, US Geological Survey.. Austin, T
  • Rettig, J.E.. 200. Variation in adult bluegill diets from two ponds with differing macrophyte abundances. American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists/Herpetologists' League/Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles meeting. Kansas City, MO
  • Hatlelid, E.D.*, G.R. Smith, and J.E. Rettig. 200. Area usage and daily behavioral patterns of a captive spotted leopard Pantera pardus pardus). Missouri Academy of Sciences [3rd Place - Biology III - Ecology and Behavior].
  • Taylor, M.T.*, J.E. Rettig, and G.R. Smith. 200. Habitat selection and diet composition in Arizona river otters, Lutra canadensis. Missouri Academy of Sciences [1st Place - Biology III - Ecology and Behavior] .
  • Rettig, J.E.. 200. Performance and success in larval bluegill: the role of resources, predation, and habitat. 24th Annual Larval Fish Conference. Gulf Shores, AL
  • Todd, A.*, G.R. Smith, and J.E. Rettig. 200. Microhabitat selection by northern cricket frogs, Acris crepitans, along a west-central Missouri creek. Missouri Academy of Sciences [2nd Place - Biology III - Ecology and Behavior].
  • Smith, G.R., M.A. Waters*, and J.E. Rettig. 199. Consequences of embryonic UV-B exposure on the growth and development of plains leopard frog tadpoles (Rana blairi). American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists/ Herpetologist's League/Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Meetings. State College, P
  • Dilts, J., G. Smith, J. Rettig, A. Strautman, P. Gabrielson, and D. Heruth. 1998. Creating a student-driven learning environment. 42nd Annual Meeting of the Association of College and University Biology Educators, Rockhurst College. Kansas City, MO
  • Dilts, J., D. Heruth, J. Rettig, and G. Smith. 199. William Jewell College case study: Creating a student-driven learning environment. Enhancing Learning-Centered Environments: The Biology of the Future. Project Kaleidoscope Workshop. Liberty, MO

Professional Memberships

  • American Fisheries Society
  • American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists
  • American Society of Limnology and Oceanography
  • Association for Women in Science
  • Ecological Society of America
  • The Ohio Academy of Science
  • Sigma Xi

Grants, Fellowships and Honors

  • Phi Beta Kappa -Earlham College. 1991
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship, Honorable Mention, 1992
  • NSF Dissertation Improvement Grant: Interactions in a stage-structured species: Resource mediated stage dynamics.  1995.
  • Declining Amphibian Populations Task Force Seed Grant: Stressor effects on amphibian larval communities: Integrated experiments on the effects of nitrate. (co-PI with Geoffrey R. Smith).  2002.
  • Sigma Xi -Denison University.  2002.

Professional Service

  • Manuscript Reviewer: Archiv fur Hydrobiologie, Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Ecological Indicators, Ecology, Environmental Biology of Fishes, Great Basin Naturalist, Ichthyological Research, Journal of Animal Ecology, Limnology and Oceanography, Oikos, Oecologia, Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
  • Reviewer for Predoctoral Fellowships for the AWIS Educational Foundation (2004-2008). AWIS is the Association for Women in Science. Reviewed proposals in the fields of ecology and evolution.
  • Grant Reviewer: National Science Foundation (NSF) - Division of Environmental Biology, Ecology section (2002, 2003)
  • Grant Reviewer: American Association for the Advancement of Science, Women's International Science Collaboration (WISC) Program (2003)

Service to Denison

  • Coordinator for Anderson Endowed Fund and Ronneberg Endowed Fund (Sept. 2007-present)
  • Chair, Steering Committee on Institutional Self-Study for Denison’s Accreditation (Oct. 2007-present)
  • Faculty participant, Denison Service Orientation program (2007)  click here for information about DSO
  • Member, HHMI-working group (2007)
  • Coordinator, 2006 Fall Faculty Conference on Academic Challenges & Expectations (jointly with members of the Faculty Development Committee)
  • Chair, Student Enrollment and Retention Committee (2005-2006)
  • Member, Ad hoc Advisory Committee on Diversity (2005-2006)
  • Co-secretary, Denison Chapter of Sigma Xi (2005-2006) (with G. Smith)
  • Coordinator, 2005 Fall Faculty Conference on Quantitative Reasoning (jointly with S. Davis & K. Mead)
  • Faculty participant, Denison Outdoor Orientation program (2005 & 2006)
  • Member, University Council (Spring 2005)
  • Member, Student Enrollment and Retention Committee (2004-2005)
  • Coordinator, Denison Scientific Association 2004-2005 Seminar Series (with G. Smith)
  • Member, Faculty Development Committee (Fall 2003-August 2006)
  • Secretary, Denison University Chapter of Sigma Xi (2002-2003 )
  • Faculty Advisor, Colleges Against Cancer (CAC) student organization (Fall 2003-present)
  • Biology Department representative for Anderson Scholarship Committee (2001-2004)
  • Faculty participant: June Orientation, June Orientation phone registration, & August Orientation (2002-present)
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Heather J. Rhodes dr. Rhodes, Heather Joy J. Rhodes

Heather J. Rhodes
Faculty  |  Biology, Neuroscience
Assistant Professor, Neurophysiologist
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
519/ lab504
740-587-6788
Service: 
2008-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., University of California, San Diego; Ph.D., Duke University
Biography: 

Academic Positions

Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, January 2008 to present

Postdoctoral fellow, Department of Biology at Boston University, 2004-2007

Grass Fellow, Neuroscience at Marine Biological Laboritories at Woods Hole, 2006

Postdoctoral researcher, Department of Neurobiology at Duke University, 2004

Research: 

I am interested in understanding how neural circuits produce perceptions and behaviors.  In my current research I study the vocal circuit of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis).  Xenopus produce rhythmic vocal patterns using a type of neural circuit called a central pattern generator (CPG).  CPGs are neural circuits that are capable of generating a rhythmic output without any rhythmic input; they are essentially pacemakers.  They are used to control a wide variety of rhythmic behaviors in other animals, such as walking, swimming, and breathing.  CPG circuits can take many forms and we don't yet understand the structure or function of the Xenopus vocal CPG, but that's one of the goals of my research.

The CPG in the Xenopus vocal system is cool in a couple of ways.  First, we can activate it in an isolated brain preparation to evoke rhythmic neural activity patterns called fictive vocalizations (like vocalizations without a voice).  Being able to reproduce the neural patterns associated with vocalizations in an isolated brain allows us to physically and pharmacologically manipulate the neural circuit and see how it affects vocal production. 

Second, the Xenopus vocal circuit is altered by hormones.  Male and female frogs produce different calls, and by changing hormone exposure you can change the types of vocal rhythms the brain produces.  For example, giving a female testosterone will cause her to produce male-like vocal patterns.  I'd like to know more about how hormones alter the neural circuits to produce these effects. 

I am also interested in understanding what cues naturally activate the vocal CPG to cause the animals to start calling.  What external stimuli or internal hormonal cues trigger vocal behavior and how? 

The techniques I use in my lab include electrophysiology (recording the electrical potentials produced by one or more active neurons in brain tissue), histology (examining anatomical features of neurons), immunocytochemistry (using antibodies find the locations of neurotransmitters and other chemicals in the brain), and behavioral studies (using automated underwater microphones to monitor frog vocal behavior).

If you are interested in my research, read the publications listed below and also look up papers by Ayako Yamaguchi (my former mentor) and Darcy Kelley both of whom also study the Xenopus vocal system.

Publications

Rhodes, H.J., Yu, H.J., Yamaguchi, A.. 2007. Xenopus vocalizations are controlled by a sexually differentiated hindbrain central pattern generator. J Neurosci. v. 27 no. 6 p. 1485-1497 View online.

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Laura Allison Romano dr. Romano, Laura Allison Allison Romano

Laura Allison Romano
Faculty  |  Biology
Associate Professor, Evolutionary Developmental Biologist
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
303 / Lab 402
740-587-6337
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., College of William and Mary; Ph.D., University of Arizona
Biography: 

The favorite part of my job is teaching, whether as a mentor, academic advisor, or course instructor. I particularly enjoy the constant flow of students in and out of my office as they stop by for advice on a range of issues, both academic and personal. Consistent with this, I am eager to participate in activities that afford me the opportunity for extensive interactions with students (such as maintaining a team of research assistants to work in my lab, or mentoring a group supported by the Posse Foundation). In addition, I volunteer for committees that are most related to their needs (including the Committee on Residential Life, and the Student Enrollment and Retention Committee). While helping students, I try to demonstrate how they can make their own contributions to the campus community and beyond. For example, I frequently ask students in my classes to apply what they have learned in ways that might benefit society (such as proposing a way to overcome climate change in BIOL 150, designing a genetically engineered organism to feed a large population in BIOL 201, or developing a new contraceptive in BIOL 324). I also incorporate “service learning” projects into my upper level courses, and I recruit students to serve as mentors in local events (such as the annual Science Fair at The Works, for which I serve as a Judge, and the “Science, It’s Elementary!” program at Granville Elementary School, for which I serve as Chair). I hope that my efforts, besides serving to inspire and educate, also fosters unlimited compassion for others, in keeping with the mission of Denison.

Research: 

Transcription is regulated by non-coding sequences known as cis-regulatory elements that are usually located upstream of the protein-coding sequence, but may be located downstream of the protein-coding sequence or even within an intron. Proteins known as transcription factors interact with these cis-regulatory elements to specify the level, timing, and spatial expression of genes. Changes in the sequence of cis-regulatory elements, or the activity of transcription factors that interact with them, can have functional consequences during development. In fact, such changes are hypothesized to be the primary basis for differences in the anatomy, physiology, and behavior of organisms (including disease susceptibility in humans).

My research utilizes the sea urchin as a model system to explore the functional consequence of changes in genes and their cis-regulatory elements with regard to protein-binding affinity, patterns of gene expression in the embryo, and/or phenotype. Most recently, my lab has focused on the extent to which there is variation in the cis-regulatory region of SM50in the "purple urchin" and several closely related species. This gene is essential for development of the larval skeleton and its transcriptional regulation has already been characterized to a considerable extent.  We are now extending our study to additional genes as well as more distantly related species such as the "pencil urchin" in an attempt to identify the molecular basis of differences in the origin and behavior of skeleton-forming cells during development.

Many undergraduate students have worked in my laboratory including Michelle Clark ('13), Efua Thompson ('13), Kayla Ako-Asare ('12), Emily Miller ('12), Saira Tekelenburg ('12), Donyea Moore ('11), Kelsey Wehrenberg ('10), Cecilia Murch ('09), Sadie Orlowski ('09), Ashley Dunkle ('08), Katie Merva ('08), Kyle Thaman ('08), Elaine Binkley ('07), Jenna Walters ('07), Laura Cannon ('05), and Nik Kiehl ('05). They have been supported by the Anderson Endowment, the Bowen Endowment, the Laura C. Harris Fund, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Office of Provost, and the NIH.

Peer-Reviewed Publications

  • Clark, M., Thompson, E., and Romano, L.A. (2012) A novel approach to deliver morpholino oligonucleotides into sea urchin eggs through an endocytosis-mediated mechanism.  Manuscript in prep.
  • Ako-Asare, K., Clark, M., Miller, E., Moore, D., Tekelenburg, S., Thompson, E., Erkenbrack, E., and Romano, L.A. (2012) Characterization of eight late regulatory genes that control formation of the larval skeleton in the primitive pencil urchin, Eucidaris tribuloides. Manuscript in prep.
  • Walters, J.L., Binkley, E.M., Haygood, R. and Romano, L.A. (2008) Evolutionary analysis of the cis-regulatory region of SM50 in strongylocentrotid sea urchins. Developmental Biology 315, 567-578.
  • Romano, L.A. and Wray, G.A. (2006) Endo16 is required for gastrulation in the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus. Development Growth and Differentiation 48, 487 – 497.
  • Romano, L.A., and Wray, G.A. (2003) Conservation of endo16 expression in sea urchins despite evolutionary divergence in both cis and trans-acting components of transcriptional regulation. Development 130, 4187 – 4199.
  • Wray, G.A., Hahn, M., Abouheif, E., Balhoff, J., Pizer, M., Rockman, M.V., and Romano, L.A. (2003) Evolution of eukaryotic transcription. Molecular Biology and Evolution 20, 1377 – 1419.
  • Romano, L.A., and Runyan, R.B. (2000) Slug is an essential target of TGFβ2 signaling in the developing chicken heart. Developmental Biology 223, 91 – 102.
  • Romano, L.A., and Runyan, R.B. (1999) Slug is a mediator of epithelial-mesenchymal cell transformation in the developing chicken heart. Developmental Biology. 212, 243 – 254.
  • Runyan, R.B., Wendler, C.C., Romano, L.A., Boyer, A.S., Dagle, J.M., and Weeks, D.L. (1999) Utilization of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides with embryonic tissues in culture. Methods, 18(3), 316 – 321.
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Tom Schultz dr. Schultz, Thomas Schultz

Tom Schultz
Faculty  |  Biology, Environmental Studies
Tight Family Professor in the Natural Sciences, Behavioral Ecologist
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
227/lab224
740-587-6218
Service: 
1990-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Texas
Biography: 

Academic Positions

  • Professor of Biology, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2000 - present
  • Chair, Department of Biology at Denison University, 1998-2001
  • Director, Denison University Biological Reserve, 1994-2003
  • Visiting Lecturer, Department of Biology at Yale University, 1988-1990
  • Post-doctoral Research Associate, Department of Zoology at Arizona State University, 1985-1987
  • Lecturer, Department of Zoology at The University of Texas at Austin, 1983-1984
Research: 

Communication signals have both content, information intended to change the behavior of a receiver, and structural properties that determine how the information is transmitted from sender to receiver. My research concerns how the structural properties of visual signals evolve and are shaped by the ecology and environment of animals, whether they are detected by mates, rivals, or predators.

The males of many animals exhibit conspicuous colors that attract mates, advertise fitness, and mitigate conflict between rivals. However, visual signals may be intercepted inadvertently by other species and intentionally by predators. Color patterns evolve in response to some or all of these selection pressures within the limits of an animal's ability to see and produce color. Damselflies are an excellent group of organisms for studying these tensions, as they are highly visual, sexually dimorphic, and vulnerable to visual predators. Some species exhibit courtship displays, territorial behavior, or occur in assemblages of closely related species where signals may be confused. The learning and behavioral repertoires of damselflies are limited and their visual environments are relatively simple to characterize. These qualities make it possible to focus on the properties of color signals that make them more or less easy to detect, and their role in transmitting information.

I am also especially interested in the function of structural colors in insects, which have unique optical properties that may be tuned to certain viewing conditions. Insects produce structural colors through ultrastructural modifications of their exoskeleton. In combination with pigments, structural colors have the capacity to produce a wide variety of adaptive color patterns ranging from the flashing iridescence of some damselflies to the camouflage of tiger beetles.

Publications

* Student co-authors

  • Schultz,T.D. & O. M. Fincke. 2009. Structural colors create a flashing cue for sexual recognition and mate quality in a Neotropical giant damselfly . Functional Ecology. v. 23 p. 724-732
  • Seago, A., Brady, P., Vigneron, J-P. & Schultz, T.D.. 2009. Gold bugs and beyond: A review of iridescence and structural color mechanisms in beetles (Coleoptera) . Journal of the Royal Society Interface. v. 6 p. S165-S184
  • Schultz, T.D.. 2009. Diversity and habitats of a prairie assemblage of Odonata at Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota. Journal of Kansas Entomological Society. v. 82 p. 91-102
  • Schultz, T.D., C.N. Anderson*, & L. B. Symes*. 2008. The conspicuousness of colour cues in male pond damselflies depends on ambient light and visual system. Animal Behaviour. v. 76 p. 1357-1364
  • Fincke, O.M., A. Fargevielle, & T. D. Schultz. 2007. Lack of innate preference for morph and species identity in mate-searching Enallagma damselflies. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. v. 61 p. 1121-1131
  • Fincke, O.M., R. Jodicke, D. Paulson, & T. D. Schultz. 2005. The frequency of female-specific color polymorphisms in Holarctic Odonata: why are male-like females typically the minority? . International Journal of Odonatology. v. 8 p. 183-212
  • Schultz, T. D. 2001. Tiger beetle defenses revisited: alternative defense strategies and colorations in two neotropical tiger beetles, Odontocheila nicaraguensis and Pseudoxycheila tarsalis (Carabidae: Cicindelinae). Coleopterists Bulletin. v. 55 p. 153-163
  • Schultz, T. D. & J. Puchalski *. 2001. Chemical Defenses in the Tiger Beetle Pseudoxycheila tarsalis Bates (Carabidae: Cicindelinae). Coleopterists Bulletin. v. 55 p. 164-166
  • Kirkton, S. D.* & T. D. Schultz. 2001. Age-specific behavior and habitat selection of adult male damselflies, Calopteryx maculata (Odonata: Calopterygidae). Journal of Insect Behavior. v. 14 no. 4 p. 545-556
  • Schultz, T. D. 1998. The utilization of patchy thermal microhabitats by the ectothermic insect predator, Cicindela sexguttata. Ecological Entomology. v. 23 p. 444-450
  • Knisley, C. B. & T. D. Schultz. 1997. The Biology of Tiger Beetles and a Guide to the Species of the South Atlantic States. Virginia Museum of Natural History, Martinsville, VA. p. 236 pp
  • Schultz, T. D., M. Quinlan & N. F. Hadley. 1992. Preferred body temperature, metabolic physiology, and water balance of adult Cicindela longilabris: a comparison of populations from boreal habitats and climatic refugia. Physiological Zoology. v. 65 p. 226-242
  • Hadley, N. F., A. Savill, & T. D. Schultz. 1992. Coloration and its thermal consequences in the New Zealand tiger beetle Neocicindela perhispida. J. Thermal Biology. v. 17 p. 55-61
  • Schultz, T. D. 1991. Tiger Hunt. Natural History. p. 38-44
  • Schultz, T. D.& G. Bernard. 1990. Pointillistic mixing of interference colors in cryptic tiger beetles. Nature. v. 337 p. 72-73
  • Hadley, N. F., T. D. Schultz, & A. C. Savill. 1988. Spectral reflectances of three subspecies of the tiger beetle Neocicindela perhispida: correlations with their respective habitat substrates. New Zealand J. of Zoology. v. 15 p. 343-346
  • Schultz, T. D. & N. F. Hadley. 1987. Microhabitat segregation and physiological differences in co-occurring tiger beetle species, Cicindela oregona and Cicindela tranquebarica. Oecologia. v. 73 p. 363-370
  • Schultz, T. D. & N. F. Hadley. 1987. Structural colors of tiger beetles and their role in heat transfer through the integument. Physiological Zoology. v. 60 p. 737-745
  • Schultz, T. D. 1986. The role of structural colors in predator avoidance by tiger beetles of the genus Cicindela. Bulletin of the Entomological Society of America. v. 32 p. 142-146
  • Schultz, T. D. & M. A. Rankin. 1985. The ultrastructure of epicuticular interference reflectors of tiger beetles (Cicindela). J. Experimental Biology. v. 117 p. 88-110
  • Schultz, T. D. & M. A. Rankin. 1985. Developmental changes in the interference reflectors and colorations of tiger beetles (Cicindela). J. Experimental Biology. v. 117 p. 111-118

Teaching

I find it very satisfying and fun to explore the natural world, but my real passion is for the learning process. The challenge of being exposed to a new idea, questioning it, evaluating it, and even testing it, is very fulfilling for me. I especially enjoy making connections between seemingly disparate ideas or concepts in different disciplines (an important ability in a time when boundaries between scientific disciplines are becoming blurred). The courses I teach all involve integrating different approaches and levels of organization. Sometimes I think I have the perfect job in that I am paid to learn new things and share them with students, and to help them to develop a "Swiss Army Knife" of critical thinking skills. With these skills, they can become good leaders and thoughtful citizens in any field, and better able to face the uncertainty of the future.

Courses Taught:

  • First Year Studies: Animal Talk
  • Introduction to the Science of Biology
  • Ecology & Evolution
  • Biology of Insects
  • Animal Behavior
  • Senior Research

One of the best aspects of being at a small college is the opportunity for close faculty-student collaboration on independent research. I have had the pleasure of advising a number of undergraduate students who have conducted a variety of outstanding research projects, many of which have been presented at national scientific meetings. As a research advisor, I involve students in my studies of insect behavioral ecology or enlist students interested in conservation biology in conducting inventories and monitoring studies at the Bio Reserve and other sites in Licking County. In almost all cases, these projects require a summer of field work prior to the senior year. In the past, my summer research students have been supported with Anderson Research Fellowships or stipends provided through the Denison University Research Foundation.

Research Projects Supervised

  • Brindle, A. 2008. Differing social environments between primate populations may generate false positive evidence of cultural variation. *
  • Gorsich, E. 2008. Ommochrome signaling in male Enallagma damselflies: can long wavelength coloration be correlated with territorial behavior? *
  • Bring, B. 2007. A study of odonate community development, habitat preferences, and colonization among ponds and artificial wetlands at Dawes Arboretum.
  • Horn, J. 2007. Suburban habitat fragmentation: effects on migratory and residential songbirds in Central Ohio. *
  • Symes, L. 2007. Polychromatism and sex identity signals in the damselfly genus Enallagma. *
  • Symes, L. 2006. Polychromatism in the damselfly Enallagma civile and an assessment of the Male-Mimicry Hypothesis. (Poster presented at 2006 Meeting of the Ecological Society of America).
  • Hughes, D. 2005. The interspecific roosting behaviors of the Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) and Black Vulture (Corapgys atratus).
  • Dunlevy, J. 2003. Investigations of summer bird residents at five sites within Licking County.
  • Anderson, C. 2002. Enallagma damselfly colors as visual signals in relation to ambient light and visual backgrounds. * (Poster presented at 2002 Meeting of the Ecological Society of America).
  • Bucci, L. 2002. Effects of vegetation and landscape on butterfly diversity and abundance. *
  • Clark, E. 2002. Corellations of odonate diversity with lotic habitat characteristics.
  • Menninger, H. 2000. Examining the ecology of an indicator taxon: damselfly species diversity and the role of habitat heterogeneity. * (Paper presented at 2000 Meeting of Ohio Odonata Society).
  • Hauck, A. 1999. Correlation between male damselfly colorations and the light environments of courtship arenas. *
  • Menninger, H. 1999. Initiation of a long-term monitoring program for Odonata at the Denison University Biological Reserve. (Poster presented at 1999 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).
  • Kirkton, S. 1997. Babes in the woods: age-specific dispersal in the territorial damselfly, Calopteryx maculata. * (Paper presented at 1997 Meeting of the Ecological Society of America).
  • Scheub, C. 1997. Diversity and abundance of the Papilionoidea at the Denison University Biological Reserve.* (Poster presented at 1996 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).
  • Kirkton, S. 1996. Why do male ebony jeweling damselflies (Calopteryx maculata) aggregate far from territorial breeding sites? (Poster presented at 1996 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).
  • Casey, J. 1996. The significance of interference colors and visual communication in Phidippus audax, the daring jumping spider. *
  • Godfrey, P. 1996. Optimal site choice and foraging posture of the ambush predator Phymata fasciatus. *
  • Forbes, B. 1995. Substrate matching and cryptic defenses in the toad bug Gelastocoris oculatus. *
  • Stocker, E. 1995. Spectral sensitivity of the visual system in the praying mantis, Sphrodomantis lineola. (Paper presented at the 1994 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).
  • Angalich, L. 1994. Correlation between conspicuousness and escape flight behavior among species of tiger beetles. * (Poster presented at the 1993 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).
  • Gallo, T. 1994. A review of the history and efficacy of the Endangered Species Act and prospect for its renewal. *
  • Price, C. 1994. A comparative study of insect colonization and decomposition of pig carrion in central Ohio. * (Paper presented at the 1994 Meeting of the Ohio Academy of Science).
  • Puchalski, J. 1994. Comparative chemical analysis of the defensive secretions of tiger beetles (Cicindelidae) and leave beetles (Chrysomelidae). *
  • Van Antwerp, A. 1994. Light gap utilization and behavioral thermoregulation by the green forest tiger beetle, Cicindela sexguttata. * (Poster presented at the 1993 Meeting of the Entomological Society of America).

* denotes Honors Project

Memberships

  • Animal Behavior Society
  • Coleopterist's Society
  • Dragonfly Society of America
  • Ecological Society of America
  • International Society of Behavioral Ecology
  • Ohio Odonata Society
  • Society for the Study of Evolution
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David Smith Smith, David Smith

Smith, David Smith
Faculty  |  Biology
Visiting Assistant Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
219
740-587-6307
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Texas State University; Ph.D., Northern Arizona University
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Geoff Smith dr. Smith, Geoffrey Smith

Geoff Smith
Faculty  |  Biology
Professor and Henry Chisholm Chair in the Natural Sciences, Amphibian Ecologist
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
413/lab 502
740-587-6374
Service: 
2000-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Earlham College; Ph.D., University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Biography: 

Academic Positions:

  • Associate Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2006 - present
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2000 - 2006
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at William Jewell College, Liberty, MO, 1997 - 2000
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at Earlham College, Richmond, IN, 1996 - 1997
Research: 

Broadly speaking, my research lies within the realm of ecology. In particular, I am interested in how individuals, populations, and communities are affected by their interactions with their environment, both the living and physical components. Much of my research program focuses on these questions as they pertain to reptiles and amphibians, and so some would identify me as a herpetologist. My research program also has become increasingly concerned with understanding how anthropogenic, or human-induced, alterations of the environment influence amphibians and reptiles. I am especially interested in examining how the introduction of non-native species and chemical pollutants affect amphibian and reptile individuals and communities.

I also collaborate with a colleague at the Universidad Nacional Autonomia de Mexico to study the ecology of Mexican reptiles and amphibians, and with a colleague at Earlham College (John Iverson) to study the ecology of turtles in Dewart Lake in northern Indiana and iguanas in Bahamas. I am very interested in including students in my research.

Publications

  • Ballinger, R.E., J.D. Lynch, and G.R. Smith. 2010. Amphibians and Reptiles of Nebraska. Rusty Lizard Press, Oro Valley, AZ.
  • Lemos-Espinal, J.A., G.R. Smith, and G.A. Woolrich-Piña. 2012. The Family Xenosauridae in Mexico. ECO Herpetological Publishing, Rodeo, NM.
  • Smith, G.R., and C.J. Dibble. 2012. Effects of an invasive fish (Gambusia affinis) and anthropogenic nutrient enrichment on American toad (Anaxyrus americanus) tadpoles. Journal of Herpetology. v. 46 p. 198-202
  • Smith, G.R., and A.A. Burgett. 2012. Interaction between two species of tadpoles mediated by nutrient enrichment. Herpetolgica. v. 68 p. 174-183
  • Li, Y., Z. Ke, S. Wang, G.R. Smith, and X. Liu. 2011. An exotic species is the favorite prey of a native enemy. PLoS ONE. v. 6 no. 9 p. e24299
  • Krishnamurthy, S.V., and G.R. Smith, and X. Liu. 2010. Growth, abnormalities, and mortality of free feeding tadpoles of American toad Bufo americanus exposed to combinations of malathion and nitrate. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. v. 29 no. p. 2777-2782
  • Smith, G.R., A. Boyd, C.B. Dayer, M.E. Ogle, A.J. Terlecky, and C.J. Dibble. 2010. Effects of sibship and the presence of multiple predators on the behavior of green frog (Rana clamitans) tadpoles. Ethology. v. 116 no. p. 217-225
  • Iverson, J.B., S.J. Converse, G.R. Smith, and J.M. Valiulis. 2006. Long-term trends in the demography of the Allen Cays Rock Iguana (Cyclura cychlura inornata): Human disturbance and density-dependent effects.. Biol. Conserv. . v. 132 no. p. 300-310
  • Smith, G.R., H.A. Dingfelder, and D.A. Vaala. 2004. Asymmetric competition between Rana clamitans and Hyla versicolor tadpoles. Oikos. v. 105 no. p. 626-632

Presentations

  • Burger, A.C., G.R. Smith, and J.E. Rettig. . 2011. Competition between invasive mosquitofish and native bluegill sunfish. Ecological Society of America meeting. Austin, TX
  • Rettig, J.E. and G.R. Smith. 2008. Double duty courses: Using an ecology course to fulfill a general education requirement for oral communication. Ecological Society of America annual meeting. Milwaukee, WI
  • Smith, G.R.. 2008. Ecology's role in solving environmental problems: A module-based environmental science course for non-majors. Ecological Society of America meeting. Wilwaukee, WI
  • Smith, G.R., C.J. Dibble, and J.E. Rettig. 2008. Small fish, big effects: The impacts of mosquitofish and ammonium nitrate on tadpoles, zooplankton, and phytoplankton. Ecological Society of America. Milwaukee, WI
  • Dayer, C.B., C.J. Dibble, and G.R. Smith. 2007. Variation in American toad tadpole and metamorph performance among three ponds. Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists. St. Louis, MO

Involvement

  • Professional Memberships
  • American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists
  • British Herpetological Society
  • Ecological Society of America
  • Herpetologists’ League
  • International Reptile Conservation Foundation
  • Natural History Society of Maryland
  • Phi Beta Kappa
  • Sigma Xi
  • Societas Europae Herpetologica
  • Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles
  • Southwestern Association of Naturalists
  • Fellowships and Honors
  • National Science Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship
  • Presidential Fellowship, University of Nebraska

Professional Service

Editor, Journal of Herpetology 2006 - 2008, 2010 (Associate Editor from 1998-2005, 2010-present)

Reviewer: Acta Oecologica, American Midland Naturalist, Amphibia-Reptilia, Animal Biology, Animal Conservation, Applied Herpetology, Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, Behavioral Ecology, Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, Biologia, Biological Conservation, Biological Invasions, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, Biopesticides International, BIOS, Canadian Journal of Zoology, Caribbean Journal of Science, Chemosphere, Chinese Journal of Oceanology and Limnology, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiolog, Conservation Biology, Contemporary Herpetology, Copeia, Cuadernos de Herpetologia, Ecological Applications, Ecology, Environmental Pollution, Environmental Science and Technology, Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Ethology, Ethology, Ecology & Evolution, Functional Ecology, Fundamental and Applied Limnology, Global Change Biology, Hamadryad, Herpetologica, Herpetological Conservation and Biology, Herpetological Journal, Herpetological Natural History, Herpetological Review, Hydrobiologia, Journal of Animal Ecology, Journal of Comparative Psychology, Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A, Journal of Herpetology, Journal of Natural History, Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Journal of Zoology, Marine & Freshwater Research, Northeastern Naturalist, Oecologia, Ohio Journal of Science, Oikos, Phyllomedusa, Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries, Revista de Biologia Tropical, Southwestern Naturalist, Toxicological and Environmental Chemistry, Transactions of the Nebraska Academy of Sciences, Western North American Naturalist, Zoological Science

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Whitney Stocker Stocker, George Whitney Stocker

Stocker, George Whitney Stocker
Staff  |  Biology
Laboratory Prep/Biologoical Reserve Manager
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
213
740-587-6359
Degree(s): 
B.S., Ohio State University
Research: 

Publications

  • Jezerinac, R.F. & G.W. Stocker 1987 Fallicambarus (Creaserinus) fodiens (Cottle) (Decapoda:Cambaridae) in West Virginia: A new state record. Ohio J. Sci., 87(1):46-47
  • Jezerinac, R.F. & G.W. Stocker 1993 A new species of crayfish (Decapoda:Cambaridae) belonging to the Genus Cambarus, Subgenus Hiaticambarus, from the upper Elk River drainage of West Virginia. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 106(2), 1993. pp. 346-352
  • Jezerinac, R.F., G.W. Stocker, & D.C. Tarter 1995 The Crayfishes (Decapoda:Cambaridae) of West Virginia. Ohio Biological Survey Bull. X(1)NS
  • Thoma, R.F. & G.W. Stocker 2009 Cambarus (Procericambarus) raymondi (Decapoda: Cambaridae), a new species of crayfish from southern Ohio. Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 122(4), 2009. pp. 405-413 
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Kevin Suh Suh, Yewseok Suh

Kevin Suh
Faculty  |  Biology
Visiting Assistant Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
Service: 
2014-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., M.S., Chonbuk National University, Republic of Korea; Ph.D., Florida State University
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Jeff Thompson dr. Thompson, Jeffrey Sean Thompson

Jeff Thompson
Faculty  |  Biology, Computational Science
Associate Professor, Molecular Geneticist & Chair (Biology)
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
215
740-587-5581
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Kalamazoo College; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles
Biography: 

Academic Positions

  • Associate Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2009- present
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2003 - 2009
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at Georgian Court College, Lakewood, NJ, 1998-2003
  • Adjunct Instructor, Science Division at Anne Arundel Community College, Arnold, MD, 1997-1998
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 1994-1998
Research: 

My research interests revolve around the manner in which DNA is structurally and functionally organized within the nucleus of eukaryotic cells.  Specifically, my lab studies histones, a family of highly conserved proteins that interact with DNA and other proteins to form material called chromatin.  Chromatin can be arranged in a variety of structural conformations, influenced in part by numerous post-translational modifications to the histones, which has implications for DNA accessibility and functionality.  We utilize genetic and molecular techniques to study the ways in which histones influence chromatin structure and function in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  We are currently working on a series of projects to gain insight into the roles that specific histone modifications play in the processes by which DNA damage, caused by environmental factors such as ultraviolet radiation, is detected and repair.

Undergraduate research students play an integral role in my laboratory.  Ranging from single summer experiences to multi-year efforts culminating in senior/honors research projects, student researchers are active participants in pursuing the questions that my lab is investigating.  Students who make substantial contributions to our research have the opportunity to present their work at professional conferences and to be co-authors on published papers.  Anyone interested in pursuing research in my lab should contact me early in the fall semester prior to the year in which they are interested in doing research to discuss potential opportunities.

Current lab members:

  • Andrea Karl (since 2013)
  • Liesje Steenkiste (since 2013)

Past lab members:

  • Marguerite Strong (2013)
  • Arron Cole (2010-2013)
  • Jono Turchetta (2012-2013)
  • Dora Vines (2012-2013)
  • Tom Snee (2012)
  • Anna Boudoures (2010- 2012)
  • Jacob Pfeil (2010-2012)
  • John Snee (2010)
  • Alyssa Rossodivita (2008- 2010)
  • Megan Ansbro (2008- 2009)
  • Jon Mecoli (2007- 2009)
  • Ariel Lee (2007- 2008)
  • Tasha Strande (2007- 2008)
  • Ashley Albrecht (2006- 2007)
  • Maggie Evans (2006- 2007)
  • Andrew Keller (2005- 2006)
  • Arzu Arat (2005)
  • Lindsey Bostelman (2004- 2005)
  • Katie McHugh (2004- 2005)
  • Leigh Stone (2004- 2005)

Publications

(principal investigator in regard to publications below; see resume for complete publication list)
* indicates undergraduate student co-author

  • Evans ME*, Bostelman LJ*, Albrecht AM*, Keller AM*, Strande NT*, and JS Thompson. 2008. UV sensitive mutations in histone H3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that alter specific K79 methylation states genetically act through distinct DNA repair pathways. Current Genetics. no. 53 p. 259-274 View online.
  • Bostelman LJ*, Keller AM*, Albrecht AM*, Arat A*, and JS Thompson. 2007. Methylation of histone H3 lysine-79 by Dot1p plays multiple roles in the response to UV damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA Repair. v. 6 no. p. 383-395 View online.
  • Smith PH and JS Thompson. 2003. Has polyploidy shaped the evolution of the eukaryotic genome? A re-examination of Ohno's genome duplication hypothesis . Bios. v. 74 no. p. 110-117 View online.
  • Thompson JS, Snow ML, Giles S*, McPherson LE*, and M Grunstein. 2003. Identification of a functional domain within the essential core of histone H3 that is required for telomeric and HM silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetics. v. 163 no. p. 447-452 View online.

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health R15 Academic Research Enhancement Award (1R15GM093849-01), 2010-2013; $317,852
  • Great Lakes Colleges Association New Directions Grant, 2010 (co-written with Jessen Havill); $3,765
  • Denison University Research Foundation Grant, 2010; $5,506
  • Denison University Research Foundation Grant, 2009; $1,474
  • Denison University Research Foundation Grant, 2006; $6,329

Service at Denison

  • Finance Committee (vice-chair, since 2012)
  • Phi Beta Kappa, President of Theta of Ohio Chapter (since 2007)
  • Sigma Xi Chapter member (since 2007, Vice President since 2013)
  • Faculty Development Committee (2010-2013, chair 2012-2013)
  • Anderson Scholarship Selection Committee (2007-2008, 2010)
  • Board of Trustees Student Affairs Committee (2008-2009)
  • Denison Scientific Association co-organizer (2008-2009)
  • Board of Academic Integrity (2007-2009)
  • Campus Affairs Council (2007-2009)
  • Board of Trustees Enrollment Committee (2005-2007)

Professional Memberships

  • Genomics Education Partnership (since 2007)
  • Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society (since 2007)
  • Beta Beta Beta Biology Honor Society (since 1999)
  • Genetics Society of America (since 1998)
  • Phi Beta Kappa (since 1988)
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Christine Weingart dr. Weingart, Christine Weingart

Christine Weingart
Faculty  |  Biology
Associate Professor, Microbiologist
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
315/ lab 404
740-587-8281
Service: 
2002-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Mount Union College; Ph.D., Miami University
Biography: 

Academic Positions

Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2002 - present

Lecturer, Department of Microbiology at Miami University, 1997

Research: 

Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

  • Post Doctorate Research Associate, Laboratory of Stephen C. Winans, 1999-2002

University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio

  • Post Doctorate Research Associate, Laboratory of Alison A. Weiss, 1997-1999

Publications

  • Weingart, C.L. C. E. White, S. Liu,Y. Chai, H. Cho, C. Tsai, Y. Wei, N. R. Delay*, A. Eberhard, and S. C. Winans. 2005. Direct binding of the purified quorum sensing regulator CepR of Burkholderia cenocepacia to two target promoters in vitro. Mol. Micro.. v. 57 p. 452-467
  • Pappas, K. M., and C. L. Weingart., and S. C. Winans. 2004. Biochemical communication in proteobacteria: Biochemical and structural studies of signal synthases and receptors required for intercellular signaling. Mol. Microbiol.. v. 53 p. 755-769
  • Weingart, C. L., P. S. Mobberley-Schuman, E. L. Hewlett, M. C. Gray, and A. A. Weiss. 2000. Neutralizing antibodies to adenylate cyclase toxin promote phagocytosis of Bordetella pertussis by human neutrophils. Infect. Immun.. v. 68 p. 7152-7155
  • Weingart, C. L., W. A. Keitel, K. M. Edwards, and A. A. Weiss. 2000. Characterization of bactericidal immune responses following vaccination with acellular pertussis vaccines in adults. Infect. Immun. v. 68 p. 7175-7179
  • Weingart, C. L. and A. A. Weiss. 2000. Bordetella pertussis virulence factors affect phagocytosis by human neutrophils. Infect. Immun. v. 68 p. 1735-1739
  • Lenz, D. H.*, C. L. Weingart and A. A. Weiss. 2000. Phagocytosed Bordetella pertussis fail to survive in human neutrophils. Infect. Immun. v. 68 p. 956-959
  • Weingart, C. L., G. Broitman-Maduro, G. Dean, S. Newman, M. Peppler, and A. A. Weiss. 1999. Fluorescent labels influence the phagocytosis of Bordetella pertussis by human neutrophils. Infect.Immun. v. 67 p. 4264-4267
  • Weingart, C. L., and A. Morris Hooke. 1999. A nonhemolytic phospholipase C from Burkholderia cepacia. Curr. Microbiol. v. 38 p. 233-238
  • Weingart, C. L., and A. Morris Hooke. 1999. Regulation of expression of the nonhemolytic, phospholipase C from Burkholderia cepacia. Curr. Microbiol. v. 39 p. 336-341
  • Aukerman, B., Esselburn, K., Freundlich, J. and C. Mustillo. 2010. Bacteria that help and hurt cows. Microbial Discovery Activity. www.asm.org (Students in my Diversity of Microrganisms course developed an activity for elementary students.).
  • Bhatt, S. and C.L. Weingart . 2008. Identification of sodium chloride-regulated genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia. Cur. Microbiol. v. 56 p. 418-422

Presentations

  • S. Bhatt* and C. L. Weingart. 2005. Characterization of four hyperosmotically induced genes in Burkholderia cepacia. 104th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol..
  • M. Perkins* and C.L. Weingart. 2005. Mutation of a potential gacSA two component system in Burkholderia cenocepacia. Ohio Branch ASM Meeting.
  • S. Bhatt* and C. L. Weingart. 2004. Isolation of hyperosmotically regulated genes in Burkholderia cepacia. 04th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol..
  • Weingart, C. L.. 2004. Identification of a putative gacSA two-component system in Burkholderia cepacia . 104th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol..
  • Weingart, C.L.. 2003. Incorporating Quorum Sensing into the Undergraduate Microbiology Laboratory. 10th ASM Undergraduate Microbiology Education Conference.
  • Weingart, C. L. and S. C. Winans. 2001. Characterization of a quorum sensing system in Burkholderia cepacia. ASM Cell-Cell Communication Meeting.
  • Weingart, C. L. and S. C. Winans. 2001. Characterization of a quorum sensing system in Burkholderia cepacia. Infection and Pathobiology Forum, Cornell University.
  • Weingart, C. L., D. H. Lenz*, and A. A. Weiss. 1999. Phagocytosis of Bordetella pertussis by human neutrophils. Midwest Microbial Pathogenesis Meeting.
  • Lenz, D. H.*, C. L. Weingart, A. A. Weiss. 1999. Lack of survival of Bordetella pertussis following phagocytosis by human neutrophils. Physician Scientist Training Program Research Forum.
  • Weingart, C. L., G. E. Dean, S. L. Newman, and A. A. Weiss. 1999. Comparison of phagocytosis of FITC and GFP labeled Bordetella pertussis. 99th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol..
  • Weingart, C. L., S. Newman and A. A. Weiss. 1998. Effect of labeling treatments on phagocytosis of Bordetella pertussis. Midwest Microbial Pathogenesis Meeting.
  • Weingart, C. L., and A. A. Weiss. 1998. Effect of immune serum antibodies on phagocytosis of Bordetella pertussis. 98th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol..
  • Weingart, C. L., and A. Morris Hooke. 1998. Regulation of expression of Burkholderia cepacia phospholipase. Microbial Pathogenesis Current and Emerging IssuesConference.
  • Weingart, C. L., and A. Morris Hooke. 1998. Regulation of expression of Burkholderia cepacia phospholipase. 98th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol..
  • Weingart, C. L., and A. Morris Hooke . 1996. Purification and characterization of a phospholipase of Burkholderia cepacia. 96th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol..
  • Weingart, C. L., and A. Morris Hooke. 1995. Purification of a non-hemolytic phospholipase C from Burkholderia cepacia. 95th Gen. Meet. Am.Soc. Microbiol..
  • Weingart, C. L., M. K. Lonon, S. Karipedes, and A. Morris Hooke. 1994. Characterization of a non-hemolytic phospholipase C produced by Pseudomonas cepacia. 94th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol..
  • Merry, C., Perkins, M., Mu, L., Eichner, S., Crabb, A., Peterson, B., Weber, R., and C. L. Weingart. . 2010. A two-component system in Burkholderia cenocepacia influences protease, swimming, quorum sensing, and pathogenesis.. 109th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol. .
  • Foy, C., and C.L. Weingart.. 2009. Investigation of selenite reduction in Burkholderia cenocepacia.. 108th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol..
  • Perkins, M.*, Crabb, A.*, Peterson, B.*, Weber, R.* and C. L. Weingart.. 2008. Characterization of a putative gacSA two component system in Burkholderia cenocepacia. . 107th Gen. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol..
  • Foy, C. and C. L. Weingart.. 2010. Examining the relationship between a two-component system and quorum sensing in Burkholderia cenocepacia.. Ohio Branch-ASM Meeting..
  • Eichner, S. and C.L. Weingart.. 2010. Distribution of the gacA gene in the Burkholderia cepacia complex. .Ohio Branch-ASM Meeting. .
  • Foy, C.R. and C. L. Weingar. 2009. Role of TolB in Selenite Reduction in Burkholderia cenocepacia.. Ohio Branch-ASM Meeting..
  • Merry, C. and C.L. Weingart.. 2009. Characterization of GacS/GacA Two-Component System in Burkholderia cenocepacia.. Ohio Branch-ASM Meeting.
  • Jaffri, S. and C.L. Weingart.. 2008. Characterization of tolB in Burkholderia cenocepacia. . Indiana-Ohio Joint Branch ASM Meeting..
  • Jaffri, S.* and C.L. Weingart. 2007. Characterization of tolB in Burkholderia cenocepacia. . Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students.
  • Jaffri, S.* and C.L. Weingart.. 2007. Complementation in Burkholderia cenocepacia of mutated tolB gene with wild type tolB gene. . Ohio Branch ASM Meeting..
  • Crabb, A. and C.L. Weingart. . 2007. An examination of a putative GacA/GacS two component system as a regulator of virulence factors produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia. . Ohio Branch ASM Meeting. (Note: Andrea won an award for best research presentation. She competed with undergraduate and graduate students.) .

Senior Thesis Students

  • Cora Walsh '06*, HIV prevention organizations: Determining successful prevention strategies. Co-Advisor with Dr. Kent Maynard, Sociology/Anthropology
  • Mike Perkins '05, Characterization of the Burkholderia cenocepacia GacSA-like regulatory system
  • Shantanu Bhatt '04*, Identification of hyperosmotically regulated genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia
  • Nicole Coggins,’13, Senior research 2012-2012
  • Herb Porter '13, Directed study 2012-2013
  • Julia Shneyderman '13, Directed study Fall 2012
  • Jamieson Weaver, Granville High School junior, Summer 2012
  • Meghan Diefenbacher,’15, Anderson Scholar-Summer 2012
  • Jessica Wilson ’11, Anderson Scholar-Summer 2011; Directed study 2011-2012
  • Kasi Eastep, Anderson Scholar-Summer 2011
  • Lin Mu, Directed study spring 2010; Directed study 2011
  • Sarah Eichner, Anderson Scholar-Summer 2009; Senior Research 2009-2010
  • Callie Merry ’09, Bowen Scholar Summer 2008; Senior Honors’ Research 2008-2009
  • Chase Foy ’10, Denison University Research Foundation research assistant, Summer 2008; Directed Study Fall 2008; Senior Honors’ Research 2009-2010
  • Sarah Jaffri ’08, Hughes Early Research Experience Scholar Summer 2006; Anderson Summer Scholar 2007, Senior Research Fall 2007-2008.
  • Bridget Peterson ’08, Anderson Summer Scholar 2007, Senior Honors’ Research, Fall 2007; Spring 2008
  • Becky Weber ’08, Senior Honors’ Research, Fall 2007-Spring 2008
  • Andrea Crabb ’07, Anderson Summer Scholar 2007, Senior Honors’ Research, Fall 2006- Spring 2007. OBASM Paul N. Hudson research award Spring 2007
  • Kate Seymour ’07, Anderson Summer Scholar 2006, Senior Honors’ Research, Fall 2006-Spring 2007.

* honors thesis

Professional Memberships

  • National Science Teachers Association
  • Local American Society for Microbiology
  • Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society
  • American Society for Microbiology
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Lina Yoo dr. Yoo, Lina Yoo

Lina Yoo
Faculty  |  Biology
Associate Professor, Cell Biologist
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
327/lab322
740-587-5803
Service: 
2005-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Duke University; Ph.D., Washington University
Biography: 

Academic Positions

Assistant Professor, Department of Biology at Denison University, 2005 - present

Teaching Assistant, Department of Biology at Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 1996

Research: 

Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

  • Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Laboratory of Dr. Junying Yuan, 2000-2005

Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO

  • Predoctoral Student, Laboratory of Dr. Samuel Speck, 1994-2000

Duke University, Durham, NC

  • Undergraduate Independent Study, Laboratory of Dr. William Kane, 1993-1994

College of Wooster, Wooster, OH

  • COSEN Scholar Research, Laboratory of Dr. William Morgan, 1993

Research Focus

Cancer occurs when a combination of DNA mutations and abnormal gene expression in a cell leads to uncontrolled growth and invasion of surrounding tissues. It is critical to understand how mutations in individual genes, or more specifically, the series of events which occur as a result of those mutations, contribute to the development of tumors.

My research focuses on a gene called Pten which is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer. Previous work has shown that deletion or reduction in Pten function leads to increased cell proliferation, resistance to cell death, and heightened motility and invasiveness. I am interested in identifying the molecular changes which occur when Pten is mutated, and to elucidate the signaling pathways which are affected. In particular, I am studying the mechanism by which Pten deletion leads to increased cell size and the induction of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21.

As a cell biologist, I use cell culture based methods in which Pten function can be reduced through the use of RNA interference, and assay for altered gene expression in candidate downstream pathways. I am also exploring the molecular basis for why certain tissues are much more susceptible than others to tumor development as a consequence of Pten mutation.

Publications

  • Elliott, J, EB Goodhew, LT Krug, N Rafael, L Yoo, and SH Speck. 2004. Variable methylation of the Epstein-Barr virus Wp EBNA gene promoter in B lymphoblastoid cell lines. J Virol. v. 78 p. 14062-5
  • Yoo, LI, J Woloszynek, S Templeton, and SH Speck. 2002. Deletion of Epstein-Barr virus regulatory sequences upstream of the EBNA gene promoter Wp1 is unfavorable for B-Cell immortalization. J Virology. v. 76 p. 11763-9
  • Yoo, LI, DC Chung, and J Yuan. 2002. LKB1--a master tumour suppressor of the small intestine and beyond. Nat Rev Cancer. v. 2 p. 529-35
  • Yoo, LI, and SH Speck. 2000. Regulation of EBNA gene expression. EBV Report. v. 7 no. p. 175-85
  • Yoo, L, and SH Speck. 2000. Determining the role of the Epstein-Barr virus Cp EBNA2-dependent enhancer during the establishment of latency by using mutant and wild-type viruses recovered from cottontop marmoset lymphoblastoid cell lines. J Virol. v. 74 p. 11115-20
  • Kung, C, JT Pingel, M Heikinheimo, T Klemola, K Varkila, LI Yoo, K Vuopala, M Poyhonen, M Uhari, M Rogers, SH Speck, T Chatila, and ML Thomas. 2000. Mutations in the tyrosine phosphatase CD45 gene in a child with severe combined immunodeficiency disease. Nat Med. v. 6 p. 343-5
  • Kim, SW, TL Ortel, MA Quinn-Allen, L Yoo, L Worfolk, X Zhai, BR Lentz, and WH Kane. 1999. Partial glycosylation of asparagine-2181 of the second C-type domain of human factor V modulates assembly of the prothrombinase complex. Biochemistry. v. 38 p. 11448-54
  • Yoo, LI, M Mooney, MT Puglielli, and SH Speck. 1997. B-cell lines immortalized with an Epstein-Barr virus mutant lacking the Cp EBNA2 enhancer are biased toward utilization of the oriP-proximal EBNA gene promoter Wp1. J Virol. v. 71 p. 9134-42
  • Weck, KE, ML Barkon, LI Yoo, SH Speck, and HW Virgin IV. 1996. Mature B cells are required for acute splenic infection, but not for establishment of latency, by murine gammaherpesvirus. J Virol. v. 70 p. 6775-80

Presentations

  • Yoo, LI. 2004. Characterization of mice conditionally deficient for Pten in urogenital epithelium. Society for Basic Urologic Research Meeting. Savannah, GA
  • Yoo, LI, D Liu, R Bronson, H Wu, and J Yuan. 2004. Pten-mediated tumor suppression in murine bladder epithelium. Cancer Genetics & Tumor Suppressor Genes Meeting. Cold Spring Harbor, NY
  • Yoo, LI, S LeVu, R Verman, H Wu, R Bronson, and J Yuan. 2003. Characterization of mice conditionally deficient for PTEN in urogenital epithelium. The Beatson International Cancer Conference. Glasgow, Scotland
  • Yoo, LI, J Woloszynek, and SH Speck. 1999. Characterization of the EBV shared Cp/Wp enhancer. The 24th International Herpesvirus Workshop. Boston, MA
  • Yoo, LI, MA Mooney, and SH Speck. 1997. Regulation of EBV latency promoters by an EBNA2 responsive enhancer. The 22nd International Herpesvirus Workshop. San Diego, CA

Fellowships and Honors

  • American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellowship grant "Dissection of the
  • Molecular Functions of the LKB1 tumor suppressor gene." July 2001-June 2004.
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship, Honorable Mention 1995.
  • Carolinas-Ohio Science Education Network (COSEN) Scholar 1993
  • Golden Key Honor Society 1993
  • Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society 1991.
  • Dean's List with Distinction 1991, 1992, 1994.
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