ASTR-340
Credit Hours:
1-2
Advanced Topics
Independent work on selected topics at the advanced level under the guidance of individual staff members. May be taken for a maximum of four semester hours of credit. Prerequisites: Junior standing and consent of chairperson.
ASTR-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Prerequisite: Consent of chairperson.
ASTR-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Prerequisite: Consent of chairperson.
ASTR-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ASTR-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ASTR-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Astronomy
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ASTR-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Prerequisite: Physics 312 or consent of chairperson.
ASTR-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Prerequisite: Physics 312 or consent of chairperson.
BIOL-100
Credit Hours:
4
Modern Topics in Biology
This course for non-majors is intended to promote scientific literacy. Topics will vary with the instructor, but each edition of the course will focus on a specific topic as a vehicle for exploring the essentials of biology and the scientific method. This course satisfies the G.E. lab science requirement. Biology 100 may not be counted toward the major in biology. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly.
BIOL-103
Credit Hours:
4
Modern Topics in Biology
This course for non-majors is intended to promote scientific literacy and quantitative reasoning. Topics vary with the instructor, but each edition of the course will focus on a specific topic as a vehicle for exploring the essentials of biology and the scientific method. This course satisfies the G.E. lab science requirement as well as the quantitative reasoning requirement. Biology 103 may not be counted toward the major in biology. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly.
BIOL-104
Credit Hours:
4
Modern Topics in Biology
This course for non-majors is intended to promote scientific literacy and oral communication. Topics will vary with the instructor, but each edition of the course will focus on a specific topic as a vehicle for exploring the essentials of biology and the scientific method. This course satisfies the General Education lab science requirement as well as the oral communication requirement. Biology 104 may not be counted toward the major in biology. Class meets for two (80 minute) or three (50 minute) periods per week plus a three-hour laboratory.
BIOL-150
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to the Science of Biology
This course is the first biology course biology majors take and is not recommended for non-majors. It is a course that introduces students to core concepts of modern biology through active participation in biological investigations. Topics include reproduction, Darwinian evolution, energetics, organisms' response to stimuli, and organismal structure and function. Imbedded throughout the course are many of the skills expected of practicing biologists including the ability to develop hypotheses and analyze and interpret data, the ability to present scientific data, scientific writing, and a familiarity with the scientific literature. This course satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.
BIOL-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Biology
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
BIOL-201
Credit Hours:
4
Cell and Molecular Biology
The study of cellular structure and function from a molecular perspective. The organization and molecular composition of cells is examined, with a particular emphasis on distinctions between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic domains. Major cell functions studied include membrane transport, signal transduction, and eukaryotic cell cycle regulation. The molecular basis of genetic expression is addressed, including topics such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, and associated regulatory processes. Evolution is also explored from the perspective of cellular and molecular biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 or consent of instructor. Chemistry 131 pre- or co-requisite. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.
BIOL-202
Credit Hours:
4
Ecology and Evolution
This course explores the fundamental biological concepts of ecology and evolution and integrates them in a study of the interactions between organisms and their environment and how those interactions shape the history of life on Earth. With a thorough understanding of population genetics and natural selection, this course addresses ecological questions at the level of the individual, population, community and ecosystem. A common thread that binds the course is the role of deterministic and stochastic processes in shaping ecological systems and macroevolutionary patterns. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or consent of instructor. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.
BIOL-250
Credit Hours:
1 or 2
Minor Problems
A research problem (library or laboratory) of limited scope which provides the opportunity for the qualified student to extend his or her interest beyond the limits of particular course offerings. Does not count toward minimal department requirements.
BIOL-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Biology
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
BIOL-300
Credit Hours:
Biology Assessment I
A pass/fail course used to track all biology majors' completion of the required assessment exam covering the Biology core. Earning the required S (pass) in this course entails attending an information session explaining the exam and taking the assessment exam in good faith. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.
BIOL-301
Credit Hours:
Biology Assessment II
A pass/fail course used to track all biology major's completion of the required senior interview. Earning the required S (pass) in this course entails attending an information session explaining the biology department's senior interview and completing the senior interview in good faith. Seniors enroll in BIOL 301 in their last semester at Denison.
BIOL-302
Credit Hours:
4
Biochemistry
A study of the chemical and physiochemical properties of living organisms. Concepts will be developed through a study of the physical and chemical properties of biological compounds and integration of various metabolic pathways in an attempt to understand the dynamics of living systems. The laboratory will include the isolation and study of properties of biological compounds. Prerequisites: CHEM 224 and BIOL 201. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 224) and Molecular Biology (BIOL 201). Offered in the fall semester (also as CHEM 302). Three class periods weekly plus laboratory. Safety glasses required. Note that due to curricular changes, BIOL 302 will not be offered after 2012-2013.
BIOL-308
Credit Hours:
4
Biodiversity Through Time
An introduction to the study of fossil invertebrates with emphasis on preservation, taphonomy, diversity trajectories through geologic time, evolutionary mechanisms, extinction, paleobiology and paleoecology. Special emphasis will be placed on using fossils to interpret ancient depositional environments. Labs will introduce the student to the major invertebrate phyla commonly preserved in the geologic rock record. Prerequisite: GEOS 210 or BIOL 202. (Normally offered Fall Semester in alternate years)
BIOL-309
Credit Hours:
4
Computational Biology
As large and complex data sets have become more prevalent in biology, computer algorithms for analyzing the data have become critical, driving the need for scientists with expertise in both fields. This interdisciplinary course will explore this intersection, examining the biology and the computational methods behind a variety of interesting and important problems. Students will initially work with a single instructor to build a background outside of their own discipline (Biology students with a Computer Science instructor, CS students with a Biology instructor), followed by a merging of the two groups into a single team-taught class, which will investigate a series of biological problems with a computational focus. The laboratory portion of the course will involve students working together in multidisciplinary groups to design algorithms to investigate these problems, as well as undertaking a self-designed "capstone" project at the end of the term. Prerequisites: Biology core and one of CS 109 or CS 110 or CS 111 or consent.
BIOL-310
Credit Hours:
4
Wetland Ecology
This course is a comprehensive study of wetland ecology, management, and policy. The main emphasis is on biological, chemical, and physical aspects of major wetland ecosystems found in North America. The course also deals with valuation, classification, and delineation of wetlands. A significant portion of the course focuses on local and regional wetland ecosystems: their history, ecology, and current status. Labs will be field-based explorations of the biology, chemistry, and ecology of these regional wetlands. Prerequisite: BIOL 202 or consent.
BIOL-312
Credit Hours:
4
Herpetology
Herpetology is the study of amphibians and reptiles, two diverse taxonomic groups that share the characteristic of being ectothermic vertebrates. This course will examine three main areas of herpetology: 1) the evolutionary relationships and biogeographical histories of these taxonomic groups, 2) comparative physiology, and adaptations of amphibians and reptiles to their natural environments, and 3) the ecology of the herpetofauna, as well as conservation issues, with a focus on amphibians. Emphasis will be placed on the critical reading of primary literature on both historical and current issues in herpetology, as well as on gaining hands-on experiences with amphibians and reptiles. Laboratories will include comparative studies of physiology and field studies of native Ohio amphibians and reptiles, making extensive use of the Denison University Biological Reserve. Prerequisites: Biology core or consent. Herpetology qualifies as a "biological diversity" course for the major.
BIOL-313
Credit Hours:
4
Vertebrate Zoology
In this course we investigate the biology of vertebrates. In particular, we will be considering the many ways in which vertebrates interact with and respond to their environment, and thus this course will emphasize the evolution, ecology, and physiology of vertebrates. Laboratories will focus on the biology of local vertebrates, and will consist of field and laboratory exercises, as well as field research projects. We will make extensive use of the Denison University Biological Reserve. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent. Vertebrate Zoology qualifies as a "biological diversity" course for the major. This course satisfies the Oral Communication requirement.
BIOL-315
Credit Hours:
4
General Microbiology
This is an introductory course in microbiology emphasizing the general structure, occurrence, habitats, and types of bacteria, viruses, and eukaryotic microbes. Mechanisms of pathogenicity and host defense strategies also are discussed. The course structure includes small group activities, student presentations, traditional lectures, and discussions of scientific literature. Laboratory emphasis is placed on the fundamental techniques of microbiology (i.e., staining, microscopy, and streak plating) and self-designed investigative labs. Students may either take General Microbiology (BIOL 315) or Diversity of Microorganisms (BIOL 317) during their academic career, but not both courses. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-316
Credit Hours:
4
Virology
Virology is a course that will examine the diversity of plant, animal, and bacterial viruses. Emphasis will be placed on topics such as molecular interactions between the host and virus, the genetics and chemical nature of viruses, and the replication strategies of viruses. This course also will examine how viruses cause disease, how they are used in biotechnology, and their overall impact on society. The structure of the course will provide peer learning activities, class discussions of primary literature, and traditional lectures. The structure of the laboratory will allow students to develop and test their own hypotheses while learning bacteriophage and tissue culture techniques. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-317
Credit Hours:
4
Diversity of Microorganisms
This course examines the remarkable environmental, physiological, and metabolic diversity of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, protists, algae, & fungi). More specifically, diversity will be studied in terms of taxonomy and phylogeny, the ability of species to live in various environments, and the application and value of genomics in diversity. Emphasis will be placed on the reading of primary literature, and on using that information to make connections with class lectures and generate hypotheses that will be tested in the laboratory. The structure of the course includes traditional lectures, class activities, and student presentations. Prerequisite: BIOL 150, 201, & 202, or consent. Diversity of Microorganisms qualifies as a "biological diversity" course for the major and minor. Students may either take General Microbiology (BIOL 315) or Diversity of Microorganisms (BIOL 317) during their academic career, but not both courses.
BIOL-320
Credit Hours:
4
Plant Systematics
In Plant Systematics students learn how major groups of vascular plants are classified, named, and identified. We study approximately 50 plant families concentrating on native representatives (using living plant material whenever possible), learn how to use keys and floras to identify local species, and learn how to find information about plants in traditional and electronic sources. Understanding evolutionary relationships among the families studied is a central theme. This course provides important background for students planning to do fieldwork in ecology, plant-animal interactions, environmental education, and related subjects. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent. Plant Systematics qualifies as "biological diversity" course for the major.
BIOL-321
Credit Hours:
4
Plant Ecology
In this course we will explore how plants interact with their environments and with other organisms, including man. We will begin at the individual level, learning how plants obtain resources from abiotic sources and through mutualistic interactions with bacteria and fungi. We will also consider how the theories of plant community ecology developed in the early 20th century and why they are pertinent today. Students will also have the opportunity to read and critique primary literature from leading journals in the field. Finally, we will develop several projects to be completed at the Denison Biological Reserve during the term for lab projects. These projects will be student-inspired and driven, with the hopes that they will contribute to our understanding of our immediate surroundings at Denison. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-324
Credit Hours:
4
Developmental Biology
Every multicellular organism begins its life as a single cell. Developmental biology is the study of the progression from this single cell to a complex, multicellular organism. Recently the powerful tools of molecular biology have linked the fields of embryology and genetics to reveal how cells, tissues, organs, and organisms develop. Especially striking is the conservation of molecules and mechanisms that underlie developmental processes in different organisms. This course provides an overview of the major features of early embryonic development in animals, and the mechanisms (molecular mechanism when known) that underlie them. We focus on two major aspects of developmental biology: (1) How is the basic body plan established? How does the basic organization of the embryo arise from the fertilized egg? What are the cellular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis and the appearance of pattered structures in the embryo? (2) How do parts become different in the embryo? Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-325
Credit Hours:
4
Genetics
This course provides a detailed and up-to-date understanding of genetics, an appreciation of how genetics affects our lives everyday from the supermarket to the doctor's office, and a realization of the applications of genetics to virtually every discipline of biology. We focus on three major areas of genetics: (1) Molecular genetics: Thinking about genetics on the DNA level - everything from DNA sequencing to mutagen testing. (2) Mendelian genetics: Thinking about genetics on the gene level-everything from inheritance to recombinational mapping. (3) The application of both molecular and Mendelian genetics to study biological processes. We start by seeing how genetic techniques can be used to dissect almost any biological process and end up answering questions such as: How does genetic disease screening work? How are genes cloned from complex organisms such as mice or even humans? How does gene therapy work? In the laboratory we carry out both molecular experiments and classical genetic experiments. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-326
Credit Hours:
4
Plant Evolution and Reproduction
In this course we will explore the evolutionary relationships and histories among the major groups of plants, both terrestrial and aquatic. We will pay particular attention to their modes of reproduction and the structures that facilitate gamete production and dispersal. We will learn how plant physiology and developmental mechanisms have allowed taxa to persist or make major transitions among different environments over time. Class reading material will consist of the primary literature and will be presented by students every week. For the laboratory component we will have one overnight trip to Hocking Hills on a weekend in September to examine and identify plants in their natural habitat, as well as shorter trips to Blackhand Gorge and the Dawes Arboretum. We will also plan together and complete a semester-long project on the effects of environment on the development of reproductive structures in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. Plant Evolution and Reproduction qualifies as a "biological diversity" course for the major. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-327
Credit Hours:
4
Biology of Insects
In this course we will explore the world of insects and their interactions with other species. Our central focus will be to survey insect diversity and explore how various orders, families, and species are adapted through evolution to their specific environment. But we will also use that diversity as a lens through which we will examine major concepts in biology. Topics of discussion will include the following: plant-insect coevolution, mating systems, anti-predator defenses, eusocial behavior, parasitism, disease transmittance, insect conservation, and control of agricultural pests. Laboratory will involve collecting insects in the field (including at times outside of class hours), identification, and preparing a collection. Biology of Insects qualifies as a "biological diversity" course for the major. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-333
Credit Hours:
4
Evolutionary Developmental Biology
Evolutionary developmental biology (or "evo-devo") is an exciting interdisciplinary field of research that seeks to understand how developmental mechanisms have evolved to produce differences in the anatomy, physiology, and behavior of organisms. This course will begin with an overview of basic concepts in developmental biology. Students will then learn about the genes responsible for specific processes and examine the functional consequence of changes in their expression during embryonic development. (For example, students will learn about the genes that regulate eye development in vertebrates, and then examine how changes in their expression have led to organisms with different types of eyes, or no eyes at all!) In lab, students will conduct a semester-long project designed to provide insight into the process by which biologists explore the evolution of developmental mechanisms. In particular, the project will involve cloning genes and analyzing their DNA sequences using a variety of bioinformatic tools. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-334
Credit Hours:
4
Comparative Animal Physiology
This course is a comparative study of how animals perform their life-sustaining functions. We'll use a wide variety of animal examples to explore the physiology of metabolism, digestion, thermoregulation, muscles, and the cardiovascular, respiratory, and osmoregulatory systems. This course will examine the adaptive significance of physiological traits at the molecular, tissue, organ and whole organism level. In addition, it will stress the ways that physiology and ecology interact, currently and over evolutionary time. Students will participate in several course labs and then design their own physiology experiments. Students may not dual enroll in BIOL 334 and BIOL 335 in the same semester. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-335
Credit Hours:
4
Human Physiology
In this course we will examine the physiology and anatomy of the major systems of the human body, including the cardiovascular, nervous, muscular, endocrine, renal, and digestive systems. We will study how the body functions to sustain life and maintain homeostasis from the level of single cells up to multi- organ systems. The course will also incorporate discussions of disease processes when the body fails to function as it should. Students will participate in lab exercises examining the function of their own human bodies and will design their own physiology experiments. Students may not dual enroll in BIOL 334 and BIOL 335 in the same semester. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-340
Credit Hours:
4
Animal Behavior
In this course we study the proximate and ultimate causes of animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Topics include the genetic, developmental and neural bases of behavior as well as behavioral strategies of habitat choice, foraging, defense, courtship, parental care and sociality. The laboratory will include several multi-week experiments designed to test hypotheses concerning behaviors observed in the field and lab. There will be a strong emphasis on data analysis and interpretation, and use of the primary literature. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-341
Credit Hours:
4
Immunology
This course is a study of concepts in immunology, focusing on the cellular and molecular aspects of the immune system in humans and other animal models. We will delve into subjects allowing students to understand the fascinating and complex mechanisms with which our immune systems defend our bodies against a constant barrage of infectious microorganisms. Topics covered include immune cell development and function, specific and non-specific immune responses to infection, immunogenetics, vaccination, and clinical disorders of the immune system such as allergies, immunodeficiency diseases, and autoimmunity. Laboratory exercises will utilize immunological techniques to address questions pertaining to the molecular function and specificity of the immune system. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-345
Credit Hours:
4
Eukaryotic Cell Biology
This course will be an in-depth examination of fundamental cellular functions, with an emphasis on how disturbances in these functions lead to disease. Areas covered in the course include intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton and cell motility, adhesion, signal transduction, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Laboratories will involve learning current methods to analyze biological processes in cells. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-349
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Neurophysiology
We will use neurophysiology and neuroanatomy to understand the links between molecules, cells, systems, and ultimately behavior. The course will start with an exploration of neurons and signaling within and among cells. We will then examine some sensory and motor systems. The last portion of the course will examine the whole animal in a neurophysiological context. The classroom portion of the course consists of lectures, discussion of the text and of research articles, problem sets, analysis of case studies, and other activities. The laboratory component will involve a mixture of behavioral, anatomical, and physiological studies on vertebrate and invertebrate animals, electronic modeling of nerve circuits, and computer simulations of nerve activity. The labs are designed to introduce students to some fundamental neurophysiological techniques and to a variety of study organisms, and to strengthen experimental design and analysis skills. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-350
Credit Hours:
4
Genomics
Genomics is the study of genomes, the entire collection of genetic information found in a specific organism. This field of study attempts to understand how all of the genes in a given genome cooperatively function to orchestrate the biological activities within the organism. The genomic DNA sequences of hundreds of species have been determined, including humans, providing a wealth of information about the genetic composition and evolutionary relatedness of species. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts in genomics, including how genome sequences are assembled, how potential genes within the genome are identified and characterized, how genomes are organized and regulated, and how genomes evolve. Contemporary papers from the field of genomics will be discussed to complement the concepts addressed in class. The laboratory component of this course will be computer-based, utilizing various online databases and "bioinformatic" programs to carry out a series of projects on genome assembly and compositional analysis. Prerequisites: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-356
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics
BIOL-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
A research problem (library, field, or laboratory) that provides the opportunity for the qualified student to extend his or her interest beyond the limits of particular course offerings. Does not count toward minimal departmental requirements.
BIOL-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
A research problem (library, field, or laboratory) that provides the opportunity for the qualified student to extend his or her interest beyond the limits of particular course offerings. Does not count toward minimal departmental requirements.
BIOL-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
BIOL-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
BIOL-370
Credit Hours:
4
Conservation Biology
Conservation Biology requires the broad use of biological disciplines such as ecology, physiology, genetics, and animal behavior, as well as appreciation of policy issues, to understand and manage biodiversity. In this course, students will learn how to apply these biological tools for the purpose of defining and maintaining biodiversity at many scales. We will also cover human impacts on biodiversity, as well as the link between science and policy in protection efforts. This course will emphasize critical reading of primary literature as well as gaining hands-on experiences with population modeling, and measuring and monitoring local biodiversity. Prerequisites: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-375
Credit Hours:
4
Population and Community Ecology
In this course, we will examine 1) how populations and communities are structured, 2) how populations and communities change over time, and 3) how populations and communities are influenced by their environment or ecological context. An emphasis will be placed on using primary literature and on doing ecology in the field and lab. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent. This course satisfies the Oral Communication requirement.
BIOL-380
Credit Hours:
4
Evolutionary Biology
This course builds on BIOL 202 and completes an in-depth survey of evolutionary theory with emphasis on processes that drive organismal change. We examine how molecular technology has impacted the study of evolutionary processes, and how new methods of analysis are changing the study of population genetics, phylogeny construction, adaptive radiation, etc. Experimental design and reading of primary and secondary scientific literature are stressed. Through the course, emphasis is placed on integration of all biological disciplines under the paradigm of evolution. Prerequisite: Biology core.
BIOL-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Biology
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
BIOL-401
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Biochemistry
This is a topical course, the content of which will vary from year to year. In general, a detailed look at a variety of recent biochemical topics will be conducted through readings of the primary literature. Laboratory will offer an in-depth, semester-long research experience. Offered Spring semester (also as Chemistry 401). Prerequisite: CHEM/BIOL 302. Safety glasses required. Note that due to curricular changes, BIOL 401 will not be offered after 2012-2013.
BIOL-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
For seniors desiring to work on an advanced research problem. Biology 451 is to be taken if no previous work on the specific research project has been accomplished. Students with prior, substantial experience on their research project (such as a summer research experience with a Denison faculty member) may petition to move directly into Biology 452. Prior consent of the advising faculty is required for registration. The grade is determined by the advisor. Completion of Biology 451 does not fulfill an upper-level biology course requirement for the major.
BIOL-452
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Senior Research
For seniors working on an advanced research problem. Following the completion of a substantial research experience, such as Biology 451 or a summer research experience with a Denison faculty member, students may take Biology 452. Prior consent of the advising faculty is required for registration. The grade is determined by the advisor. Completion of Biology 452 fulfills one upper- level biology course requirement for the major. Students enrolled in BIOL 452 have the option of pursuing senior research with Recognition. Interested students should speak with their research advisor or the Chair of Biology to learn more about the Recognition process and expectations.
BLST-102
Credit Hours:
4
Black Women's Lives: Autobiography As Protest
The purpose of this course is to explore personal narrative and autobiography as texts of resistance in Black women's lives. The course will use the multiple genres of autobiography such as poetry, essay, short narrative, memoir and major autobiographical works to illustrate Black women's resistance to race, class, and gender subordination or other forms of marginalization and oppression in their lives and in society. These autobiographical texts will be paired with select readings from women's studies and black studies to provide students with the analytical tools to identify how these texts function as forms of personal, social, political or institutional protest. Cross-listed with WMST 102.
BLST-115
Credit Hours:
1
Gospel Piano
BLST-122
Credit Hours:
2
African/Diasporan Dance I
African/Diasporan Dance I focuses on African-centered forms of dance in one of many possible genres across the African Diaspora (e.g., traditional African forms, dances of the African Diaspora, African American vernacular, Hip-Hop, Contemporary African, etc.). Taught from a cultural perspective, this course emphasizes fundamentals such as fluidity, use of the head, spine and pelvis, grounded and weighted qualities, isolations and complex embodied rhythms. Concert attendance, short written critical responses and weekly written journals are examples of outside work that is required. Cross-listed with Dance. No previous dance experience is expected.
BLST-133
Credit Hours:
1
Gospel Choir (Ensemble)
BLST-139
Credit Hours:
1
Gospel Ensemble
BLST-146
Credit Hours:
1-4
Special Topics in Black Studies
BLST-154
Credit Hours:
4
African Art and Visual Culture
This course examines the diverse arts and visual culture of Africa. The scope of this course ranges from pre-colonial to contemporary times, considering a selection of objects, concepts and practices from across the continent. The course is designed to provide you with an introduction to these art forms and the various socio-cultural, historical, critical and aesthetic platforms from which they operate. In addition, we will explore some of the key theoretical issues in the portrayal and interpretation of art and visual culture from this world arena.
BLST-165
Credit Hours:
4
Gender, Imperialisms, and Colonialisms in African History
Beginning with "classic" theoretical readings on Gender and Imperialism, this seminar will provide a forum to "explore" the gendered nature of imperialism and colonialism with a particular focus on key imperial nations of the 19th century, namely Britain, France, Belgium, and Portugal. Often projected as a male endeavor, the success (and failure) of European imperial projects in Africa had as much to do with women as it had to do with men. The readings and our own research into the subject matter will help us "discover" this historical reality. We will read a wide variety of primary and secondary source material, including travelogues, novels, films, photographs, newspapers, and histories of imperialism and colonialism. Each student will pick a research topic of her or his choice; this will afford each one a wonderful opportunity to hone research, writing, and presentation skills.
BLST-171
Credit Hours:
4
Pre-Colonial Africa
This survey course will introduce students to the history of Africa from the earliest times to 1880 - also known as pre-colonial African history. Though the focus is on Africa south of the Sahara, North Africa will be featured from time to time. Topics include the earliest human settlements in Africa, empires and kingdoms in East, West, and Southern Africa, Islam and Christianity in Africa, slavery, and the partitioning of the continent by powers in the mid 1800s.
BLST-172
Credit Hours:
4
The History of Africa Since 1880
This course examines myths about Africa, the history of colonialism on the continent in the 19th and 20th centuries, the rise of primary resistances to colonialism in the late 1800s and early 1900s, and how this fed the secondary and tertiary resistance movements from the 1930s through to the 1990s when the apartheid regime collapsed in South Africa. Through close readings of the historiography, students will grapple with the history of colonialism and the postcolonial era in Sub Saharan Africa.
BLST-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Elementary Topics in Black Studies
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
BLST-212
Credit Hours:
4
Race and Ethnicity
Contrary to the expectations of many modern social theorists, race and ethnicity continue to be important elements in the lives of contemporary people, serving as frameworks through which individual identities, community actions, and cultural meanings are interpreted. This course will introduce students to the sociocultural analysis of racial and ethnic identities. How did ethnic and racial identities and communities develop over time? Why does race, though now understood to be a social rather than a biological category, continue to be (mis)understood as a biological category? How do aspects of political, class, gender, and sexual identities influence racial and ethnic identities? We will use a global perspective to understand the conception of race and ethnicity. We will explore these topics among others including cultural and historical variability of ethnic and racial categories, the dialectical formation of identity, and the persistence of certain forms of racial and ethnic prejudice. Students will be expected to examine critically their own common assumptions and presuppositions about race and ethnicity, and to begin developing the theoretical tools for interpreting life in an ethnically diverse world.
BLST-219
Credit Hours:
4
World Music
This course includes in-depth studies of several representative genres of music from around the world, including their social or political contexts. Traditional and popular musics of the world can play important roles in religion, identity formation (gender, race, sexuality), tradition, education, agriculture, history preservation, political resistance and domination, protest, symbolism and entertainment. Students will learn to identify, classify, and describe musical examples from several cultures by discerning musical styles, instrumental or vocal timbre, form and texture.
BLST-222
Credit Hours:
4
Representing Africa on Film
An examination of ethnographic/documentary film dealing with Africa as well as contemporary cinema produced by African filmmakers. This class accords particular attention to the perspectives of African filmmakers as agents in the representation of cultures, social realities and histories in Africa.
BLST-223
Credit Hours:
2
African/Diasporan Dance II
African/Diasporan Dance II focuses on African-centered forms of dance in one of many possible genres across the African Diaspora (e.g., traditional African forms, dances of the African Diaspora, Hip-Hop, African American vernacular, contemporary African, etc.). Taught from a cultural perspective, this course deepens exposure to fundamentals and aesthetics with complex phrasing and multi-layered movement. Emphasis is placed on fluidity, use of the head, spine, and pelvis, grounded and weighted qualities, isolations and complex embodied rhythms. Limited work outside the classroom is required. Examples include concert attendance, focused relative research inquiries, weekly journal writing, and video essays. Cross-listed with Dance 222. Level II is only open to students with previous dance experience in any genre.
BLST-225
Credit Hours:
4
African American History
This course will examine the history of African-Americans in the United States from 1619 to the present with an emphasis on the processes by which African-Americans adjusted to and resisted their conditions. Topics will include African heritage, slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, Jim Crow, wartime experiences, the shift to urban life, the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, the rise of Hip Hop, and contemporary issues. (Fall Semester)
BLST-228
Credit Hours:
4
Rebellion, Resistance and Black Religion
This course examines the cultural continuities between African traditional religions and Black religion in the United States. It also explores the connection between politics and religion among Black Americans and the role religion plays in the African-American quest for liberation. The course examines theological and ethical issues, such as the color of God and the moral justifiability of violent revolution. Students will be given an opportunity to study contemporary religious movements, such as Rastafarianism and the Nation of Islam, along with more traditional African sectarian practices such as voodoo and Santeria.
BLST-229
Credit Hours:
4
Mediating Gender and Sexuality
In this class we will examine and evaluate the cultural construction and representation of gender and sexuality in contemporary American mass media, and trace their development throughout the 20th century. We will focus on a variety of mass-produced commercial media texts, surveying television, magazines, advertising, and popular music. Although gender is the primary identity construction examined in this course, we will also pay close attention to other aspects of identity that define American women, such as ethnicity, class, and sexuality. We will investigate representational issues in relation to their political repercussions, and draw from a broad range of academic literature, including feminist television criticism, film theory, cultural studies, communication theory, and popular music criticism.
BLST-234
Credit Hours:
4
History of Gospel Music
This course will explore the historical development of African-American gospel music in the 20th Century. The course will begin an examination of the pre-gospel era (pre-1900s-ca. 1920), move on to gospel music's beginnings (ca. 1920s), and continue unto the present. The course will explore the musical, sociological, political, and religious influences that contributed to the development of the various gospel music eras and styles. Through class lectures, demonstrations, music listening, reading and writing assignments, students will learn about the significant musical and non-musical contributions of African American gospel artists and the historical development of African American gospel music. Students will also strive to gain an understanding of the African American musical aesthetic and to determine how it is retained and expressed with African American gospel music and other musical genres. The class is open to students, staff, and faculty of all levels.
BLST-235
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Black Studies
An introductory study of the Black experience in America, this course will survey the field by examining in series, the various social institutions that comprise Black American life. Students will be introduced to fundamental contemporary issues in the study of Black religion, politics, economics and the family. Additionally, this course will serve as an introduction to Afrocentricity, "the emerging paradigm in Black Studies," and to the new scholarship on Blacks in America.
BLST-237
Credit Hours:
4
Global Health and Local Wellbeing
The course examines the sociocultural bases of both Western and non-Western medical and psychiatric systems. It focuses especially on different cultural assumptions about the nature and causes of illness and the institutional arrangements for the care of patients. The course will consider a variety of social scientific theoretical perspectives on the relationship between illness, medicine, and society. It will assess the degree to which non-Western medical systems may be compatible with and/or of benefit to Western medicine and psychiatry. This course has no prerequisite.
BLST-239
Credit Hours:
4
Racialized Perspectives of Media
This course critically examines the forms that racial and ethnic representations have taken in American media. The course will attempt to chart changes in public perception of racial and ethnic difference in the context of cultural and social transformations, as well as adjustments in the U.S. media industry. We will first establish a foundational knowledge of media criticism and explore theories and perspectives on how ethnicity is experienced in American culture. We will then focus on the topic of the representation of ethnicity in American media, surveying it historically, in relation to specific ethnic groups, at particular moments, and in a variety of genres.
BLST-246
Credit Hours:
2-4
Special Intermediate Topics in Black Studies
This course provides a venue in which to explore chosen topics in Black Studies at the intermediate level. Topics vary according to the interests of students and faculty. In some cases, the course may be repeated for credit. This course may be cross-listed based on the topic and disciplines that inform it.
BLST-255
Credit Hours:
4
Ethnic Literature
A study of the literature of various ethnic, racial and regional groups of the United States. This course explores cultural heritages, historical struggles, artistic achievements and contemporary relations of groups in American society.
BLST-259
Credit Hours:
4
Oral Tradition and Folk Imagination
An inquiry into the methodology of folklore study and an examination of the folk idiom in the American experience.
BLST-265
Credit Hours:
4
Black Women and Organizational Leadership
This class explores Black women's leadership orientations in organizations. Afrocentric and womanist frameworks are used to inquire about Black women's leadership in the context of their lives. In this course we explore and theorize Black women's use of communal and generative leadership orientations as well as their application of a multiple and oppositional consciousness. Organizational dilemmas stemming from their race, class, and gender, as well as the unique challenges Black women leaders face in creating a supportive life structure are examined. Students will critique the omission of Black women's leadership styles in the mainstream theories about leadership, as well as explore the implications of Black women's leadership for expanding mainstream theory. Cross-listed with WMST 265.
BLST-325
Credit Hours:
4
African-American Women's Literature
Historical and contemporary African-American women's literature grounds an inquiry into black women's literary and intellectual traditions within the matrix of race, gender, class, and sexual relations in the United States.
BLST-326
Credit Hours:
4
Southern African History
This course grapples with a basic but fundamental question that has been at the heart of much scholarship on Africa: how is southern Africa's history distinct from the history of the rest of the African continent? To address this issue, this course takes a sweeping approach, covering major developments in southern Africa from the mid-17th century through the era of formal colonization and subsequent independence. We will be particularly interested in exploring the foundations and growth of a racial order in southern Africa, and more broadly examining the role that race has played in this region through the colonial and postcolonial eras. Major themes will include cultural contacts between Africans and non-Africans; the slave trade and its consequences; Shaka and myths surrounding the Zulu Empire; economic transformations in the colonial era; and the struggle for independence in different southern African countries.
BLST-327
Credit Hours:
2
African/Diasporan Dance III
African/Diasporan Dance III focuses on African-centered forms of dance in one of many possible genres across the African Diaspora (e.g., traditional African forms, dances of the African Diaspora, African American vernacular, Hip-Hop, contemporary African, etc.). Taught from a cultural perspective, it is designed for students with significant experiences in African/Diasporan dance technique. This course approaches technique holistically and provides students with the rigorous practice required for performance. Emphasis is placed on fluidity, use of the head, spine, and pelvis, grounded and weighted qualities, isolations, and understanding or complex embodied rhythms. Because this course meets approximately 6 hours per week, little outside work is required. Cross-listed with Dance 322. Permission of instructor required.
BLST-333
Credit Hours:
4
The Civil Rights Movement
This seminar will examine the struggle for African-American equality from the 1930s to 1970. The course will begin with the origins of the Civil Rights Movement during the New Deal and World War II. We will then explore the key campaigns, figures, organizations, and guiding themes of the Movement. Special attention will be paid to the processes by which grassroots activism forced responses from the federal, state, and local governments.
BLST-334
Credit Hours:
4
Dancing in the Street: African-American Urban History
This course explores the history of the African-American urban experience. In the mid-18th century, the African-American community began to transition from a rural to an urban population. By the mid-20th century, African-Americans had become an overwhelmingly urban group. The course examines the process of the rural-to-urban transformation of African-Americans and the ways in which they have confronted, resisted, and adjusted to urban conditions of housing, employment, education, culture, and public space.
BLST-335
Credit Hours:
4
Composition Theory and Pedagogy
An introduction to theory and practice in composition and an opportunity to apply theories in Denison's Writing Center or nearby classrooms. Students may concentrate on applying theory to any context, tailoring the practicum to their areas of interest.
BLST-337
Credit Hours:
4
The History of Black Power: From Marcus Garvey to Chuck D
This course explores the history of the ideology of Black Power and its various dimensions and incarnations from its origins in the early 20th century to its significance in the present. Topics to be addressed may include, but are not limited to: definitions of Black Power, applications of this ideology to politics and economics, artistic aesthetics, gender dynamics, key figures and organizations, current manifestations, meanings for the African-American community, and reactions from the larger American society.
BLST-339
Credit Hours:
4
Culture, Identity and Politics in Caribbean Society
This course focuses on the social, cultural and political life of the Caribbean area, especially the English- and French-speaking areas. A fragmented group of nations decidedly on the periphery of the global economy, the Caribbean was once one of the richest areas of the world. Its riches then depended on the labor of enslaved Africans; the fruits of the plantation economy were enjoyed mainly by European planters. What is the legacy of such a history? We review the variety of Caribbean policies, from the strong democratic traditions of Jamaica to the autocratic rulers of Haiti, and explore how the Caribbean's unique combination of cultural influences affect the political processes, ways of life, class divisions and ethnic stratification evident in the Caribbean today. Prerequisite: SA 100 or consent.
BLST-340
Credit Hours:
4
Social Movements
In this course we explore social movements as a primary means of social change. We attempt to understand the conditions which precede, accompany and follow collective action. Particular case studies for analysis will be drawn from the United States and cross-cultural contexts to illustrate that social movements are human products that have both intended and unintended consequences. This course is sometimes taught with a special subtitle: "Social Justice Movements in Communities of Color," cross-listed with the Sociology/Anthropology Program. Prerequisite: SA 100 or consent.
BLST-343
Credit Hours:
4
Demography of Africa
In this course, we begin by reviewing current literature to clearly define the term, Demography. Next, we examine the demographic processes of population change in the continent of Africa. Demographic processes include mortality, fertility and migration. In addition, we explore patterns of urbanization, economic development and educational attainment. We analyze survey data from the African Census Analysis Project and Demographic Health Survey. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of demographic processes that allow an examination of interesting demographic, social and anthropological questions. Prerequisite: SA 100.
BLST-345
Credit Hours:
2-4
Topics in Black Studies
BLST-355
Credit Hours:
4
The Harlem Renaissance
An analysis of the interrelationship between the cultural phenomenon and the literature of the Harlem Renaissance, particularly the way in which the social, economic and political conditions of the era helped to shape the literary art of the 1920s.
BLST-356
Credit Hours:
4
The Narrative of Black America
A study of representative samples of Black literature ranging from slave narratives to contemporary Black fiction.
BLST-357
Credit Hours:
4
Postcolonial Literature and Criticism
Readings in literature and criticism from Asia, Africa, Latin American and the Caribbean, in response to the experience of colonialism.
BLST-360
Credit Hours:
4
History of African American Education
The goal of this course is to examine the historical experiences of African Americans in education and related aspects of life. Much of the course will focus on Blacks' experiences in schooling in the South from Reconstruction to the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. In addition, students will contrast African American schooling experiences with those of Native Americans and others during this period. Students who enjoy and benefit from cooperative and participatory learning environments are encouraged to take this course. Prerequisite: EDUC 213 OR BLST 235.
BLST-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
BLST-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
BLST-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
BLST-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
BLST-365
Credit Hours:
4
Studies in 16th- and Early 17th- Century British Literature
A study of selected works of poetry, prose and drama from 1500-1660.