Schedule of Events

All campus convocation at 1:30 pm January 29, Swasey Chapel. Music begins at 1:00 pm.

Sign-up for social justice workshops or service projects!

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Service Projects*

This year, DCA has 5 on-campus activities benefitting the Salvation Army, the Humane Society and so many others! We’d love to see you all there!

  • Bake cookies for Licking County Aging (10:30 - noon)
  • Tie dog & cat blankets for the Humane Society (10:30 - noon)
  • Pack lunches for the Salvation Army (9:30 - 11 AM)
  • “Unsung Hero’s Project”: Make thank you cards and treat bags for Denison Staff (security, maintenance, etc.)(10:30 - noon)
  • Stuff teddy bears for the Children’s Hospital(10:30 -noon)

Sign up above participate in a service project

January 29 Morning

Various locations

Cost of Poverty Experience Poverty (COPE ) Simulation*

The Cost of Poverty Experience (COPE) is a learning experience that gives participants an opportunity to experience poverty firsthand through the eyes of real families who live in it. Participants will walk away with a deeper understanding, especially those who have never lived in poverty or understood the impact it can have on families and communities. This workshop is guaranteed to change your understanding of poverty and the common assumptions about people who live in poverty. COPE allows participant to role play the stories of real families impacted by poverty that go beyond the stereotypes of what is seen in the news or written in books or social media. It also captures the role that community organizations and institutions play in the perpetuation of poverty through their interactions with individuals and families. By bringing a group of people together who come from diverse backgrounds, life experiences and opinions about poverty, COPE can be a breakthrough experience that advances new thinking, new strategies, and even new collaborations to address poverty in your community.

January 29 10-noon

Roost, Slayter 3rd floor

Faith and Spirituality: Engaging Experiences in the Denison Community

Following Sustained Dialogue’s model of meaningful and impactful conversation, this workshop will pose the questions: What does faith mean to you? Where do secular, agnostic, and nontraditional voices have room to speak in conversations on faith? Using the 2018 MLK Day Keynote as a guide, this workshop is an opportunity to explore interfaith dialogue, connect with people who hold different beliefs, and better understand the role of faith in the Denison community. In this dialogue, we hope to engage people of different faith identities and experiences through significant exchange on the topic. This event will preview the spring semester’s multi-week dialogue program.

January 29 10-noon

Burton Morgan Lecture Hall, 100 Burton-Morgan

Designing a Beloved Community*

Join fellow students, staff and faculty in this design studio facilitated by the Red Frame Lab and DCGA (Denison Campus Governance Association) in which participants will design real projects with collaboration, inclusion and community as design principles rather than goals. DCGA has collaboration among its highest values, and Red Frame brings design processes with a bias toward action. This workshop provides an opportunity to synthesize the messages, the research, and the calls to action of the MLK Day celebrations and to design activities, behaviors, and projects that put these into action on Denison’s campus. Denison’s design thinking approach emphasizes building empathy by listening, reframing problems in light of insights gained by listening, imagining a broad array of ideas, applying our design principles of collaboration, inclusion and community to prioritize our ideas, and the opportunity to prototype, test and iterate on our ideas before we invest our time and energy to put them into action on campus. The result will be several Denison-generated stand-alone projects, activities that can inform new projects, and day-to-day behaviors all designed by Denison, for Denison, taking us one step closer to our own “Beloved Community.”

January 29 10-noon

Red Frame Lab – Slayter 200

The Kalief Browder Story - Injustices Unleashed

The purpose of this workshop is to explore racism, law enforcement misconduct and corruption in the court system through the Kalief Browder story. We will analyze how this transpires on college campuses and the effect it has on students. Kalief Browder, a 16 year old New York resident, was falsely accused of stealing someone’s book bag in 2010. Browder was emotionally and mentally fighting for his life until being released after three years; more than half of which was spent in solitary confinement. After filing a civil rights lawsuit against the state and rejecting a plea deal, he remained in jail to prove his innocence. When he was finally released he was faced with PTSD and suffered mentally and emotionally and committed suicide. Browder is an excellent example of how black and brown bodies are treated by law enforcement-people who are supposed to protect us rather than suppress us. From this workshop, we hope to start conversation about topics that may make some uncomfortable, but also enlighten people on the multiple injustices that are lived every day. We hope to offer solutions on how we can become involved in organizations that fight to move beyond talk and act to put an end to these injustices.

January 29 10-noon

Samson -Talbot 210

Why We Should Talk About Worldview: Making the Case for Interfaith Cooperation at Denison, a workshop for faculty and staff.

Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC) staff will lead a workshop using IFYC’s online BRIDGE curriculum (Building Regular Interfaith Dialogue through Generous Engagement) focused on ‘making the case’ for engaging worldview diversity on campus. Participants will explore existing scholarship supporting the need for interfaith engagement and consider actions they might take to advance interfaith cooperation on campus. Workshop participants will experience the content of the workshop as well as discuss opportunities to lead the session for others on campus.  

January 29 10-noon

Shepardson Room, Slayter 400

Do You Have a Dream? Sustainability, Social Justice, and a Vision for Tomorrow

For many of us, the intersection between environmental sustainability and social justice is a vast, unexplored territory. Participants in this session will explore that territory through dialogue and a short, online activity designed to help each of us acknowledge our individual and collective impact on both the environment and the just distribution of resources and goods. This session challenges participants to consider questions such as the following: What is the common good, how does environmental sustainability factor into definitions of the common good, and can we / how can we achieve a global common good? What can I do as an individual to promote social justice and sustainability? What can we do as a society to promote social justice and sustainability? Are current sociopolitical and economic structures and ideals - such as the nation-state; capitalism; materialism; consumerism; scientism; globalism; militarism; or even the money economy - suited to the creation and / or maintenance of a just and sustainable future? If not, what kinds of sociopolitical and economic structures and ideals might be better suited to the task? Come to this session prepared to think radically, to listen respectfully, and to share courageously!

January 29 3:30-5:30

Fellows 204

Tikkun Olam: Jewish Approaches to Social Justice

This workshop scratches the surface of the concept of “Tikkun Olam,” an incredibly important tenant of Judaism that translates to “repairing the world.” Practically speaking, this phrase motivates strong ties to social justice movements within the larger Jewish community. As Judaism is very much a “religion of the book,” in that text is at its heart, the workshop will begin by talking generally about this fact, and pulling one or two short lines or paragraphs from the Torah, Gemarah, or Talmud that speak to this topic. After spending some time dissecting these phrases, we will open up the floor for conversation—“what does ‘repairing the world’ look like to you?” As there is much to say about Jewish involvement in the Civil Rights movement, we may transition to this discussion by first providing a general overview of that involvement, as a way to point out one instance of “Tikkun Olam” in action. Our ultimate goal is to bring about a thoughtful and interactive conversation, which is relevant to our times and to the causes that participants care about.

January 29 3:30-5:30

Shepardson Room, Slayter 400

First of All, Servants of All, We Shall Transcend All.

The brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha, Rho Upsilon Chapter will present a workshop on “bettering your community”. Our brother Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (a member of our fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc.) exemplified this throughout his lifetime. What many people fail to realize is that Brother King was simply living and exemplifying the legacy of Alpha. This presentation has three parts. The first simply talks about the impact of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity in Black history. Being the first historically intercollegiate black fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha has had a significant impact on the success of black people in universities for over 111 years. Secondly, we will talk about the fraternity’s mission which is to be servants of our community no matter what. Lastly, we will hold a discussion specifically relating to Denison and about small improvements that are not difficult to implement and are within our abilities as Denisonians. Our goal is to inspire people to ‘better the community’ in their own way. We believe that there is no better way to honor our brother, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

January 29 3:30-5:30

Burton Morgan Lecture Hall, 100 Burton-Morgan

Spirituality in Our Social Justice Curriculum

There has been a rich history of service within our educational institution, including abolition, women’s suffrage, and other central issues from previous times. Up until the 1960’s, Denison’s religious affiliation was a guiding principle behind that activism. This workshop will focus on the ways in which religion has impacted civic action and engagement on our campus. Attendees will discuss whether we as a campus still practice community engagement as a norm, or if that element of our curriculum faded out with our phasing out of religious affiliation. In addition, attendees will discuss the balance between community engagement and academic workloads and other personal commitments. We would like people to consider their own community service experiences during their time at Denison and think about how those experiences may have allowed them to connect across differences, whether they be religious, racial, socioeconomic, etc. This workshop seeks to start a conversation about how students are currently learning, who we are learning from, and the untapped wealth of information that lies within the minds of community members and organizers of Licking County. This discussion will consider our current framing of academic rigor, students’ physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being, and positive outcomes that can potentially come from community-engaged scholarship.

January 29 3:30-5:30

First-Year Lounge, Higley Hall 118

Pluralism and Coalition: Competing Values? A Philosophy Coffee

We build coalitions in the hope of effecting positive social change. But are there instances when coalitions may be counterproductive or place undue limits on the groups and individuals they bring together? When building a coalition different groups, factions, or political parties set aside their individual aims to form a temporary partnership and work towards achieving a common goal. Are there instances in which coalition building forces individuals or groups to compromise their (or their respective group’s) own ideals in ways that counter or undermine the very goals the coalition seeks to achieve? To what extent might coalitions limit the possibilities for individual critique of political or state institutions?

January 29 3:30-5:30

Knobel Hall, 327 Burton Morgan

Identity + Appreciative Knowledge = Interfaith Leadership (for students)

Moments change minds. Shared experiences touch hearts. True stories save lives. This idea of using experiences and shared moments to bring people together across lines of difference is one of the core skills of interfaith leadership. Not only does it build meaningful relationships as a method of engagement, but it also helps us to build a social movement. In this session, we’ll explore what it means to be an interfaith leader, discover the interfaith leader in each of us, and discuss a few relational approaches to movement building. Presented by Interfaith Youth Core.

January 29 3:30-5:30

Burton Morgan 218

Dialogue Skills for Interfaith Engagement (for students)

In every interfaith leader’s journey we come to moments where the chasm between our views and the perspective of another seems insurmountable. In this session, we’ll explore concepts, skills, and methods for engaging in challenging conversations and examine best practices concerning difficult issues of religious diversity in the campus and civic environment. Then, we’ll practice some skills for engaging in one-on-one challenging conversations.

January 29 3:30-5:30

Burton Morgan 219

Buddhism as a Nationalist Agenda in Myanmar

There is a cover of Times Magazine as “The Face of Buddhist Terror”, featuring a striking image of Ashin Wirathu, a nationalist Burmese Buddhist monk. While Buddhism as a religion is considered non-violent, non-extremist, and non-nationalist, there are cases where Buddhism has been used as a tool against groups of people to carry out a religious, socio-cultural, and political agenda. Current events in Burma indicates how violence is promoted by certain Buddhist monks in order to make Burma an ideal Buddhist nation, in particular towards the Muslim community in Myanmar. Though there are many interpreted philosophies of Buddhism, its teachings center non-violence, even considered anti-violence, as an ideal. This presentation will focus on Theravada Buddhism in Burma (Myanmar) and the recent violence facilitated by, promoted by, and condoned by certain Buddhist extremist groups, such as one led by Ashin Wirathu. We will be looking at Burma’s colonial, post-colonial, nationalist isolation, and current timelines in order to discern its relationship with Buddhism. This historical context will help us center the conversation and how a non-self and non-attachment religion such as Buddhism becomes a socio-political means for a nationalistic doctrine.

January 29 3:30-5:30

Burton Morgan 317

Dinner: The State of Our “Beloved Community” *

Join Denison students, faculty/staff, Granville community members, and Greater Columbus community members for dinner and interfaith dialogue. Our topic for the evening is: The State of Our “Beloved Community”; after a full day of programming, we will share food together and consider what we can do to realize a “Beloved Community” locally. Sign up via Google forms

January 29 5:30 pm

Roost, Slayter 3rd floor

Why Read King?

Martin Luther King, Jr., was, not surprisingly, quite thoughtful about the opportunities and challenges inherent in questions about education’s ends. “The function of education,” he wrote, “is to teach one to think intensively and creatively. Intelligence plus character—that is the goal of true education.” The equation sounds simple, but in an era where personality, vitriol, and cynicism stand in opposition to conscience, thoughtfulness, and courage, it’s easy to confuse the variables and reach conclusions that span from simply wrong to profoundly harmful. In this talk I’ll ask a different question: Why read King? Careful reflection on some of the writings and speeches from his vast storehouse of words will highlight the urgent relationship between reading and democracy, and between rhetoric, moral identities, and our shared civic lives. In striving to answer why we should read King, I will argue that reading him now never has been more important.

January 29 7:30 pm

Shepardson Room, Slayter 400

The Inescapable Network of Mutuality: Love, Justice & Mindfulness*

Join Reka Prasad as she discusses relational mindfulness and its role in creating sustainable movements toward healing and justice. This workshop will cover the basics of mindfulness, how it can play a transformative role in how we see ourselves and others, as well as experiential practices, including guided meditation.

January 29 7:30 pm

Red Frame Lab – Slayter 200

Performances and Exhibitions

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Available Light Theatre presents Idris Goodwin’s How We Got On*

The Dept. of Theatre, thanks to the generosity of the Mellon Foundation, the Provost, and the President, have in residency this year Available Light Theatre from Columbus. Part of the AVLT residency will be a tour to Denison’s campus of one of the pieces from AVLT’s current season, a remounting of their production of Idris Goodwin’s How We Got On (2012)¨†a coming of age drama about young people of color, music and identity in the suburbs, and the rap music of the 1980s (http://avltheatre.com/shows/howwegotontour/); AVLT calls it a “Midwestern hiphop fable.” AVLT’s original production in 2014 was one of the earlier ones of Goodwin’s play (it was very good) and we’re excited to bring the remounting to Denison. The event is free with open seating but tickets are required. Sign up via eventbrite here.

8 pm Jan. 26 & 27 (Friday and Saturday)

Ace Morgan Theater

Ferguson Voices: Photo Exhibit

A traveling photo exhibit emerging from the University of Dayton’s Human Rights Center and PROOF: Media for Social Justice. Ferguson Voices is part of the Moral Courage Project, a team of UD students and program coordinators who conducted oral history research in Ferguson, Missouri in May 2016. Ferguson Voices: Disrupting the Frame features powerful portraits and compelling audio recordings of the events from people in the community.

From the project description: “The exhibit provides critical texture to the story of Ferguson by focusing on profiles that fracture the dominant narrative. Ferguson Voices highlights the contributions of average people who found the courage to stand up during moments of unrest.”

To hear these impactful voices, visit the exhibition in the Library from February 5th to the 16th and join the exhibition’s curators for a panel discussion on February 12th @4:30pm! Brought to you by the Departments of Narrative Nonfiction Writing, Black Studies, the Library, and the Museum.

February 5 - 23rd

Denison Library Atrium

Ferguson Voices: Curator Talk

A panel discussion by the curators of Ferguson Voices Photo Exhibit

February 12th 4:30 pm

TBA

Exhibition of the works of Emory Douglas

Renowned Revolutionary Artist and Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party, Emory Douglas has made his mark on American culture through his thoughtful and provocative work. He served as art director and lead illustrator for the Party’s newspaper, for which he created widely distributed prints that now reflect American history and society in the 1960s and 1970s. In conjunction with the Department of History, a selection of Mr. Douglas’ work will make its home @ the Denison Museum in Spring 2018. Brought to you by the Departments History and the Denison Museum.

On view February 5th - May 4th, 2018

Denison Museum

Meet the Artist: Emory Douglas Talk

Join us in the Exhibition space to talk with Emory Douglas, Renowned Revolutionary Artist and Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party. The Denison Museum is proud to welcome Mr. Douglas to campus for a discussion on his artwork, including time for question and answer.

February 21st 5:30 pm

Exhibition space, Denison Museum

Contact Us

Mail
Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration
100 West College Street
Granville, OH 43023

Alison Williams

Associate Provost for Diversity and Intercultural Education

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