History Comes Alive: Meeting Emory Douglas of the Black Panthers

Visiting Artists

On February 22, students in Dr. Araiza’s seminar, “The History of Black Power: From Marcus Garvey to Chuck D,” had the chance to meet and talk with Emory Douglas, the well-known graphic artist who was the Minister of Culture and Revolutionary Artist for the Black Panther Party, starting in 1967. Douglas made significant contributions to the movement through his work as the producer and art director of The Black Panther newspaper, as well as designer of posters and pamphlets that advertised the party’s work. According to the Letterform Archive’s website, Douglas’s “work became the visual identity of the Black Panther Party.”

The Denison History Department, in conjunction with the Denison Museum, hosted a visit from Douglas on February 21 - 23. In addition to giving an artist talk at the Museum and participating in other campus events, Douglas met with Dr. Araiza’s seminar at the Museum, where the students had the opportunity to learn first-hand about his experiences as a revolutionary artist, to talk about the ways that art impacted the work of the Black Panthers work in the Black Power Movement, and to think about the ongoing connections between art, politics, and civil rights today.

The Denison Museum’s Exhibit, “The Work of Emory Douglas,” is on display until May 4.

Posted Date 
Friday, March 2, 2018

What's Happening

Denison Magazine

The ON Switch

Conversations with faculty about what it means to teach — and to trigger those amazing moments of illumination

More From Denison
Denison Seminars
Denison Seminars
Denison Seminars
Study Abroad
Study Abroad
Living at Denison
Living at Denison
Living at Denison
Career Exploration
Career Exploration