Higley Hall

Higley Hall

Established: 
1941
Current Use: 

The building now houses the departments of Communication and Economics, two of the largest academic departments on campus, and offices of the First-Year Program and the Center for Service Learning.

History & Architecture

Higley Hall is one of architect William Gehron's many buildings on Denison's campus. Built in 1941 of Harvard brick and Bedford limestone in the Georgian Revival style, the building was originally named the Life Science Building and was a gift of William Howard Doane's daughter, Ida. In 1997 the building underwent extensive renovation and modernization and was renamed Higley Hall in recognition of a substantial gift from Beverly and Albert M. Higley, a Denison graduate and trustee whose construction company has been involved with more than 20 buildings on campus. The building now houses the departments of Communication and Economics, two of the largest academic departments on campus, and offices of the First-Year Program and the Center for Service Learning. The expanded space now enjoyed by these departments has meant creative freedom to open up the classroom, develop different teaching and learning configurations and to bring extra energy and experimentation to classroom interactions. The lobby has created a communal space where students and faculty have developed a sense of community, identity and belonging.

Central Campus
After a heavy snowfall in 1952, campus pranksters blocked the entrances to Higley Hall, then known as the Life Science Building, with giant snowballs. Their fellow students were amused. Professors were not.
Building Style: 
Harvard brick and Bedford limestone in the Georgian Revival style
Mark Moller

A conversation with Mark Moller, dean of first-year students, philosophy professor and, yes, a Winnie the Pooh fan.

Orientation at Denison takes many forms. One of them involves a backpack, a sleeping bag, a long walk, and a lot of fun.