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January 2015 26

  • Monday
    7:30 PM
    The Denison University MLK celebrations and the Global Studies Seminar welcome Rick Polhamus presenting "Peacemaking in Palestine."
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    Full Description: The Denison University MLK celebrations and the Global Studies Seminar welcome Rick Polhamus presenting "Peacemaking in Palestine." Rick Polhamus is a member of Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT) and has worked in the Middle East over the past 14 years. He has training and experience in violence reduction, conflict resolution and transformation, negotiation, and mediation. Polhamus has lived and worked in many places with CPT including extended stays in South Dakota, Mexico, Colombia, Puerto Rico, Palestine/Israel, and Iraq. He has served on CPT's steering committee and has been CPT’s representative to the World Council of Churches (WCC), where he was part of the founding group of the WCC’s Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine and Israel (EAPPI).
    Address: Slayter Hall, University Room, Denison University, 200 Ridge Road, Granville, OH 43023
    Open to Public: Yes
    Sponsored By: Global Studies Seminar
    Event Contact: Linda Krumholz, 740-587-5740

February 2015 09

  • Monday
    7:30 PM
    The Global Studies Seminar welcomes Xioa Jiang and Luis Villanueva presenting "Smith, Malthus, and Recent Evidences in Global Population Dynamics."
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    Full Description: The Global Studies Seminar welcomes Xioa Jiang and Luis Villanueva presenting "Smith, Malthus, and Recent Evidences in Global Population Dynamics." In conventional economic theories, the change of population is determined “exogenously” outside of the economic system. However, classical political economists Adam Smith and Thomas Malthus have long argued for the “endogenous” determination of population, hence establishing a connection between economics and demography. In this paper, we borrow their ideas to empirically examine the evolution of the relationship between per capita outputs and population dynamics for the period of 1970 – 2008 on a global scale. We find empirical evidences that correspond to both Smith and Malthus’s arguments. In this paper, we also conduct a projection for the additional real income needed for the global population to stabilize. Xiao Jiang is an assistant professor of economics and a consultant for the International Labor Organization (ILO) and Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASAN). His research interests are international trade and development, classical political economy, economic modeling, and history of economic thought. Luis Villanueva is an assistant professor of economics and member of the Young Scholars Initiative of the Institute of New Economic Thinking (INET). His research interests are economic development in third world countries, economic history of Latin America and classical political economy.
    Address: Slayter Hall, Denison University Room, Denison University, 200 Ridge Road, Granville, OH 43023
    Open to Public: Yes
    Sponsored By: Global Studies Seminar
    Event Contact: Fadhel Kaboub, 740-587-6315

February 2015 16

  • Monday
    7:30 PM
    The Global Studies Seminar welcomes Trey Proctor presenting, "Female Slave Litigants, Gendered Rhetoric, and Abuse in Colonial Lima, Peru."
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    Full Description: The Global Studies Seminar welcomes Trey Proctor presenting, "Female Slave Litigants, Gendered Rhetoric, and Abuse in Colonial Lima, Peru." ABSTRACT: This talk focuses on the concrete practices of spending time and sharing newspapers in a network of outdoor reading rooms or “footpath libraries” established by the Pune Municipal Corporation in 2004-2005. Drawing on conversations with readers I met at these sites, I suggest that the social institution of the newspaper library itself can be read as a site of cultural assertion for a new kind of urban community. With a nod to Benedict Anderson, whose central assertion in Imagined Communities was rooted in the idea of strangers communing through novels and newspapers, I call these accidental communities. Accidental, because partaking in the sociality of the reading room is born less of established social relationships than of accidents of history and geography. But communities, nevertheless, because the men (and it is only men) who come together in these spaces do so not just to read but also, importantly, to claim a place in the changing city. BIO: Matthew Rosen teaches in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. He received his Ph.D. in anthropology from The New School for Social Research in New York City. His dissertation concerned a community of readers in Pune, a city of 3 million in western India, where he carried out 22 months of research with the support of AIIS, Fulbright, and NSF grants. Matthew’s current research examines the changing nature of “ordinary reading” in an age of mass literacy and global communication.
    Address: Slayter Hall, Denison University Room, Denison University, 200 Ridge Road, Granville, OH 43023
    Open to Public: Yes
    Sponsored By: Global Studies Seminar
    Event Contact: Fadhel Kaboub, 740-587-6315

February 2015 23

  • Monday
    7:30 PM
    The Global Studies Seminar welcomes Matthew Rosen presenting "Reading the Readers: The ‘Footpath Library’ as a Site of Cultural Assertion in a Once- Provincial City."
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    Full Description: The Global Studies Seminar welcomes Matthew Rosen presenting "Reading the Readers: The ‘Footpath Library’ as a Site of Cultural Assertion in a Once- Provincial City." ABSTRACT: This talk focuses on the concrete practices of spending time and sharing newspapers in a network of outdoor reading rooms or “footpath libraries” established by the Pune Municipal Corporation in 2004-2005. Drawing on conversations with readers I met at these sites, I suggest that the social institution of the newspaper library itself can be read as a site of cultural assertion for a new kind of urban community. With a nod to Benedict Anderson, whose central assertion in Imagined Communities was rooted in the idea of strangers communing through novels and newspapers, I call these accidental communities. Accidental, because partaking in the sociality of the reading room is born less of established social relationships than of accidents of history and geography. But communities, nevertheless, because the men (and it is only men) who come together in these spaces do so not just to read but also, importantly, to claim a place in the changing city. BIO: Matthew Rosen teaches in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. He received his Ph.D. in anthropology from The New School for Social Research in New York City. His dissertation concerned a community of readers in Pune, a city of 3 million in western India, where he carried out 22 months of research with the support of AIIS, Fulbright, and NSF grants. Matthew’s current research examines the changing nature of “ordinary reading” in an age of mass literacy and global communication.
    Address: Slayter Hall, Denison University Room, Denison University, 200 Ridge Road, Granville, OH 43023
    Open to Public: Yes
    Sponsored By: Global Studies Seminar
    Event Contact: Fadhel Kaboub, 740-587-6315