COMM-250
Credit Hours:
4
Communication and Technology
This course is designed to examine the impact of the Internet and information technology on our daily lives. Advanced technology becomes a normal part of life and creates new contexts for communication. This class goes beyond technical and how-to-issues to investigate how new media affects our communication practices with others. Over the semester we will focus on issues relating to mediated communication and advanced communication technology. Particular topics discussed include media effects, relationships, identity, agency, distanciation and genesis. This course is designed for students who already have basic experience with computers and the Internet.
COMM-255
Credit Hours:
4
Visual Communication
This course explores how we perceive and interpret the images and visual texts that we encounter. The course introduces perspectives from visual intelligence, media aesthetics, and visual rhetoric, while offering students opportunities to employ these perspectives in analyzing a range of visual mediums.
COMM-280
Credit Hours:
4
Theorizing Communication
This course introduces students to selected theoretical perspectives and vocabularies for understanding human communication. This course is designed to both introduce and provide an overview of the discipline of communication studies. First-Year or sophomore standing or consent. Required of all majors and minors.
COMM-290
Credit Hours:
4
Research in Communication
The purpose of this course is to expose students to major research methods used in the communication discipline. The course will sensitize students to issues in the field, familiarize students with types of research methods used in the discipline and enable students to formulate research questions, and design appropriate studies to answer those questions. In addition, the course will facilitate students' ability to understand the logic and process of research and to engage in critical analyses of reports and studies published in communication journals. First-year or sophomore standing or consent. Required of majors/minors.
COMM-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Communication
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
COMM-305
Credit Hours:
4
Comparative Media Systems
This course examines media systems in developed and developing nations. It explores the ways in which various media systems have been shaped and influenced by the social, political and cultural systems in which they are located and, in turn, how the media shape and influence those systems. Investigating the different contexts that determine how a medium such as television, radio, or the internet is used in terms of who decides what is conveyed to the public, and with which rationale, students will examine the ways in which media outlets around the world have or have not served popular expression and democracy. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-306
Credit Hours:
4
Organizational Culture
This course is informed by the claim that communication is the means through which we construct, participate, and convey the cultures of which we are a part. The constitutive nature of communication is explored by investigating an existing organizational culture through an application of communication concepts and theories, cultural studies theories, and qualitative research methods. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-307
Credit Hours:
4
Media Historiography
Media Historiography introduces students to the processes of conducting historical research in communication and media studies. Using mediated communication from past eras, the course will provide students with the analytical tools necessary to situate literature, film, television, and popular music in their historical milieus. Students will be encouraged to see media forms from prior eras as sites where meaning is contested, not just simple reflections of a period's prevailing politics. In written work, students will practice the methodologies used by communication and media scholars to interrogate these sorts of questions: archival research, ethnography, and formal analysis. Through these written assignments, as well as readings, screenings, and class discussions, students will consider mediated communication as evidence of the dynamic, disputed political, economic, and cultural forces at work in prior eras.
COMM-311
Credit Hours:
4
Ethics and the Public Sphere
This course explores the intersection between communication ethics and political communication in the context of democratic pluralism. After being introduced to the central themes, questions, and literatures of discourse ethics and dialogic philosophy, students then explore the relationships between response and responsibility, and ethics and politics, in deliberative public spheres. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-313
Credit Hours:
4
Listening, Thinking, Being
Although we know listening is central to communication, we rarely think about it. In this course we place listening at the center of communication and explore a range of sound environments and listening practices including auditory cultures, acoustic ecology, animal communication, film sound, music, human dialogue, and deaf cultures. Rather than focus on technical questions such as how to be a more effective listener the course asks the basic question of how we listen and explores the indissoluble relationships between listening, speaking, thinking, and being. Along the way, we will also consider the cultural, philosophical and ethical dimensions of listening. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-315
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Communication
These classes focus intensively upon a particular aspect of communication. May be taken more than once for elective credit as an upper division course. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-320
Credit Hours:
4
Language, Culture, and Communication
This course is based on an understanding that culture is maintained through systems of meaning, and that communication is the sharing of meaning between people. This course explores the many ways in which language, culture, and communication interact with, influence, and manifest each other. It investigates the relationships between these three constructs using the tools of linguistic anthropology, semiotics, and cultural theory to gain a better and deeper understanding of the taken-for-granted aspects of our social worlds. During the semester, students will examine the cultural influences of language on communication, social functions of language, cultural signs and codes, spoken language, dialects, bilingualism, and multiculturalism. This course is designed to encourage students to synthesize core course concepts and apply them to everyday lives in critical and creative ways. Prerequisites: Communication major or minor; COMM 280 and COMM 290.
COMM-324
Credit Hours:
4
The Rhetoric of Citizenship
This course explores the symbolic dimensions of the American public discourse about rights and citizenship. Students will undertake historical and rhetorical examinations of the key texts and issues that give these their tone and tenor. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-325
Credit Hours:
4
Narrative Ethics
This course will examine how narrative and storytelling shape meanings and perceived values for personhood. We will explore an array of philosophical perspectives such as those of Paul Ricoeur, Jerome Bruner, and Arthur Frank. Concurrently, we will examine storytelling in multiple contexts including children's books, court cases, health incidents, media anecdotes, and everyday conversations. Through investigating these various contexts, we will develop different approaches to defining and applying narrative communication. Specifically, we will practice reflexive methodology by cross-examining our personal lives in the context various ethical perspectives and dilemmas. In doing so, we will address questions such as: Are stories lived before or after they are told? What is the relationship between narrative and reality? What role does narrative serve in developing moral understandings and guiding ethical practices? These questions will be addressed during class discussions, as well as in written assignments entailing personal narratives, co-authored standpoints, and creative projects that respond to the ethical issues surfaced throughout the course. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-328
Credit Hours:
4
Communication Law
Communication Law examines the constitutional and statutory principles associated with the First Amendment issues of free speech and free press. The course examines legal decisions, governmental regulatory doctrines, and self-regulatory practices which inform First Amendment law. Particular topics discussed include censorship, obscenity and pornography, libel law, privacy, governmental secrecy, free press/fair trial, regulation of telecommunications, advertising and the Internet. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-329
Credit Hours:
4
Gender and Communication
This course focuses on (1) the role of interpersonal, social and political communication in the construction of gender expectations in American culture, and (2) how those expectations get communicated/performed, and thus reified, in our daily lives. We will explore the complex interplay between self expectations and social expectations of gender that get expressed, challenged, and ultimately influenced by and within a variety of social and interpersonal contexts: education, the body, organizations, friends and family, romantic relationships, the media, and politics. Cross-listed with WMST 329. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290, or WMST major.
COMM-333
Credit Hours:
4
Digital Technology and Cultural Change
The world of communication continues to change rapidly, and with it, the cultural landscape. New avenues of social connection, political action, and creative production are clashing with powerful financial, legal, and political forces, and the outcomes of these clashes are far from certain. This class explores the possibilities for cultural change that digital technology presents and the social and economic struggles over the future of our culture. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-344
Credit Hours:
4
Exploring Rhetorical Texts
This course examines the art of rhetorical criticism. In becoming a practicing rhetorical critic, students will learn to situate, interpret, and judge historical and contemporary public persuasive discourse. Topics include the nature of criticism and the role of the critic, the process of contextual reconstruction, key issues in textual reading, and methods of rhetorical analysis. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-345
Credit Hours:
4
Cultural Globalization and Identity
This course will critically engage with the phenomenon of the global circulation of culture. It will seek to understand the consequences of the process whereby texts, ideas and images that for long remained confined to their locations of origin are today increasingly mobile and de-territorialized. Objects of popular culture such as television, cinema and music, are circulating and being consumed around the world and are helping challenge the traditional markers of human identity such as nation, culture and language. While they are allowing individuals to imagine alternatives to existing realities they are also engendering a backlash against a perceived imposition of new ideas, values and culture. This course will seek to familiarize students with these ongoing changes and the conflicts over cultural and national identity that it has given rise to. We will begin with arguments that present a totalizing view of this process (the Cultural Imperialism thesis) and then over the course of the semester complicate and nuance those arguments by introducing agency and empowerment for the consumers of global culture. We will do this by closely studying actual case studies (from reality TV in Saudi Arabia or McDonalds in Japan) in order to understand the stakes involved in the struggle to define and "protect" national and cultural identity. At the end of this semester long course students should have gained a deep understanding of why the process of global flow of culture is a deeply contentious and political phenomenon. Understanding these conflicts through the lens of identity will help students complicate that term as well as interrogate their views about their own identity. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290; majors and minors only.
COMM-349
Credit Hours:
4
The Trouble with Normal: Normalization, Discourse and Power
One of the primary ways that social power and control are exercised is through the establishment and enforcement of "norms": gender norms, racial norms, sexuality norms, norms of able-bodiedness, norms of beauty and body size, and more. This course delves deeply into the theoretical literature of normalization, especially the work of Michel Foucault, and applies it to a wide range of topics including sexuality, disability, gender roles, body size, and more. The course is cross-listed with Queer Studies. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-350
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Journalism
This course allows students to explore the planning, reporting, and writing of in-depth news stories. It also explores the ethical considerations of such projects. The organic and collaborative process provides students the opportunity to hone their writing skills by focusing on the importance of story structure and content. Prerequisites: COMM 108 or COMM 280 or COMM 290 or consent of instructor. (Offered spring only)
COMM-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
COMM-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
COMM-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
COMM-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
COMM-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Communication
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
COMM-401
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics Seminar
These seminar courses focus intensively upon a particular aspect of communication. Recent examples include Visual Culture and Media and Cultural Policy. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-402
Credit Hours:
4
Language, Identity and Politics: Discourse and the Public Sphere
This course examines the role of language and discourse in constructing, maintaining and transforming identities, publics and politics in late 20th century democracies. Throughout, we will consider the relationship between language use and unequal relations of power. We will begin with an introduction to discourse studies and explore discourse as symbolic power, social practice and ideology. Next, we will examine the role of discourse in constructing and maintaining identities and communities, including those of sublatern and marginalized publics. Finally, we will examine and critique the role of discourse in public sphere(s) from Afrocentric, feminist and queer perspectives. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-403
Credit Hours:
4
Culture and Communication
This seminar takes a historical and critical approach to understand the role communication plays in creating various cultural experiences. Topics include: How can we best understand and study the construction of "culture" through a communication lens? What does "American culture" mean within a pluralistic and diverse society? How are different cultural voices created, heard or erased? How is "America" constructed from international scholars' perspectives? Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-404
Credit Hours:
4
Media and the Presidency
This course examines the relationship between the media and the American presidency from both a historical and contemporary perspective. The seminar focuses on the historical dynamics of the relationship, the role of institutional factors in White House coverage, the influence of presidential press coverage on public perception of the presidency, and the influence of the media on presidential election campaigns. Resources and texts represent a diversity of views among scholars, journalists and presidential administration personnel. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-406
Credit Hours:
4
Rhetoric and Social Movements
This course focuses on the historical rhetorics of discontent and transformation. Students will examine the characteristics and functions of persuasive discourse produced by social movements; the ways in which symbolic action sought to shape perceptions of concrete realities. Of particular interest will be the intersection of cultural context, biography, and creative rhetorical strategy. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-408
Credit Hours:
4
Critical Perspectives in Communication
This course is designed to acquaint students with criticism as a method for answering research questions in communication. Students will be provided with opportunities to apply various methods in the writing of essays analyzing various kinds of communication texts - both discursive and non-discursive. Public communication via public speaking, broadcast, film and print media as well as art, architecture and music will be among the texts examined over the course of the term. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-409
Credit Hours:
4
International Communication
This seminar examines the nature of information flows within and between nations, the issues raised by such communication, and the institutions involved and patterns evident in the development of and relations between nation-states. The course explores issues surrounding the constituent role that the news and entertainment media have played in the formation and maintenance of the nation-state. Topics raised will include uses of information in domestic and foreign policy, the extension of cultural imperialism, corporate invasion of privacy, and incursions upon sovereignty and national security. In examining the resolution of such issues, the course analyzes how nations' power is distributed and utilized among multiple forces. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-413
Credit Hours:
4
Rhetoric and the American Experience
This course explores the American rhetorical tradition and some of the speakers, ideas, and movements that have given American rhetorical tradition its voice and texture. We will read broadly and deeply key oratorical texts from the nineteenth century to the present and examine the scholarship that has attempted to explain these acts of symbolic influence. Our work will culminate in the drafting and thorough revising of article-length research essays. Students will be invited throughout the seminar to stretch and refine their voices as working rhetorical scholars. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-415
Credit Hours:
4
Conflict and Communication
A study of how the use of communication during the process of social interaction creates and resolves conflict. The course will explore theories relating to the nature of conflict, strategic negotiation models, issues revolving around third party intervention, and other topics related to the current research in peace, reconciliation, conflict and communication theory. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
COMM-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
COMM-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
CS-109
Credit Hours:
4
Foundations of Computer Science
This course is an introduction to computational problem solving. In each instance of the course, students will develop their abilities to abstract and model problems drawn from a particular application domain, and generate elegant and efficient solutions. Students will practice these skills by developing computer programs to solve these applied problems. Possible application domains may include modeling in the social sciences, big data analysis, robotics, artificial intelligence, etc. The course will cover programming fundamentals, as well as the development of algorithms and data manipulation techniques related to the chosen application area. The level of this course is equivalent to CS 110 and 111; therefore students may earn credit for at most one of CS 109, 110, and 111. Absolutely no prior experience is necessary.
CS-110
Credit Hours:
4
Foundations of Computing Through Digital Media
This course is an introduction to computational problem solving. Students will develop their abilities to abstract otherwise complex problems and generate elegant and efficient solutions. Students will practice these skills by developing computer programs that manipulate digital images and sounds. These skills will prove applicable not only in subsequent computer science courses but in numerous other fields. The level of this course is equivalent to CS 109 and 111; therefore students may earn credit for at most one of CS 109, 110, and 111. Absolutely no prior experience is necessary.
CS-111
Credit Hours:
4
Foundations of Computing for Scientific Discovery
This course is an introduction to computational problem solving. Students will develop their abilities to abstract (or model) otherwise complex problems and generate elegant and efficient solutions. Students will practice these skills by developing computer programs that solve problems motivated by research in the sciences. Additional topics may include Monte Carlo methods, data analysis, population dynamics, computational biology, genetic algorithms, cellular automata, networks, data mining, and fractals. The level of this course is equivalent to CS 109 and 110; therefore students may earn credit for at most one of CS 109, 110, and 111. Absolutely no prior experience is necessary.
CS-119
Credit Hours:
1
Seminar: Programming Problems
Students meet weekly to solve a challenging programming problem. Strategies for solving problems will be discussed. Used as a preparation for programming contests. Prerequisite: CS 173. Offered fall semester.
CS-173
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Computer Science
A study of intermediate level computer science principles and programming techniques with an emphasis on abstract data types and software engineering. Topics include recursion, sorting, dynamic memory allocation, basic data structures, software engineering principles, and modularization. Prerequisite: CS 109 or 110 or 111.
CS-174
Credit Hours:
4
Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science
This course covers mathematical topics necessary for understanding concepts in computer sciences. Topics include proofs, sets, relations, functions, number theory, induction, solving recurrences, probability, elementary counting techniques and matrices. Prerequisite: CS 109 or 110 or 111.
CS-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Computer Science
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CS-200
Credit Hours:
1
Topics in Computer Science
Occasionally, the department offers this "mini course" devoted to a particular application or programming language. Past offerings have included scripting languages, Mac OS X programming, LaTeX, Chemoinformatics, and iOS/mobile device programming.
CS-215
Credit Hours:
1
Technical Communication I
This course aims to enhance mathematics and computer science students' proficiency and comfort in orally communicating content in their disciplines. Students will present three talks during the semester on substantive, well-researched themes appropriate to their status in their major. Prerequisite: Math 210 or CS 271.
CS-271
Credit Hours:
4
Data Structures
In this course, students study a variety of data organization methods, and implement and analyze the efficiency of basic algorithms that use these data structures. Course topics include lists, stacks, queues, binary search trees, heaps, priority queues, hash tables, and balanced trees. Students will also be introduced to basic functional programming in LISP. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Intermediate Computer Science (CS 173) and a grade of C or higher in Discrete Math (CS 174) or Proof Techniques (MATH 210). Prerequisites: CS 173 and either CS 174 or MATH 210.
CS-275
Credit Hours:
4
Elementary Graph Theory
Graphs are mathematical structures that are used to model a great variety of phenomena ranging from the internet to social networks to phylogenetic clusters. In this class, we will study the mathematical properties of graphs and develop algorithms to solve many common graph problems. Prerequisite: CS 109, 110 or 111 and 174 or Math 210.
CS-281
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Computer Systems
The Introduction to Computer Systems course provides a perspective into how computer systems execute programs, store information, and communicate. It enables studoents to become better problem solvers, especially in the dealing with issues of performance, portability and robustness. It also serves as a foundation for courses on operating systems, networks, and parallel computing, where a deeper understanding of systems-level issues is required. Topics covered include: basic digital logic design and computer organization, machine-level code and its generation by compilers, performance evaluation and optimatization, representation and computer arithmetic, and memory organization and management.
CS-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Computer Science
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CS-309
Credit Hours:
4
Computational Biology
As large and complex data sets have become more prevalent in biology, computer algorithms for analyzing the data have become critical, driving the need for scientists with expertise in both fields. This interdisciplinary course will explore this intersection, examining the biology and the computational methods behind a variety of interesting and important problems. The laboratory portion of the course will involve students working together in multidisciplinary groups to design algorithms to investigate these problems, as well as undertaking a self-designed "capstone" project at the end of the term. Prerequisites: CS 173 and either CS 271 or MATH 231. Students are also encouraged to have taken BIOL 150 and 201. Course is cross-listed with BIOL 309.
CS-315
Credit Hours:
1
Technical Communication II
This course is a capstone experience in oral and written communication for mathematics and computer science majors. Students will research a substantive topic, write a rigorous expository article, and make a presentation to the department. Prerequisite: Math/CS 215. Corequisite: a 300-400 level mathematics or computer science course.
CS-334
Credit Hours:
4
Theory of Computation
This course is a study of formal languages and their related automata, Turing machines, unsolvable problems and NP-complete problems. The department strongly recommends that student enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 275.
CS-337
Credit Hours:
4
Operations Research
This course involves mathematical modeling of real-world problems and the development of approaches to find optimal (or nearly optimal) solutions to these problems. Topics include: Modeling, Linear Programming and the Simplex Method, the Karush-Kuhn Tucker conditions for optimality, Duality, Network Optimization, and Nonlinear Programming. Prerequisite: Math 231.
CS-339
Credit Hours:
4
Artificial Intelligence
A survey course of topics in Artificial Intelligence including search, formal systems, learning, connectionism, evolutionary computation and computability. A major emphasis is given to the philosophy of Artificial Intelligence. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisite: CS 271 or Math 231 or consent of instructor.
CS-349
Credit Hours:
4
Software Engineering
Students will apply their theoretic background, together with current research ideas to solve real problems. They will study principles of requirements analysis, methods of designing solutions to problems, and testing techniques, with special emphasis on documentation. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisite: CS 271 and 281.
CS-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
CS-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
CS-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CS-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CS-371
Credit Hours:
4
Algorithm Design and Analysis
In this course, students study in depth the design, analysis, and implementation of efficient algorithms to solve a variety of fundamental problems. The limits of tractable computation and techniques that can be used to deal with intractability are also covered. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271, 275, and junior/senior status.
CS-372
Credit Hours:
4
Operating Systems
A study of the principles of operating systems and the conceptual view of an operating system as a collection of concurrent processes. Topics include process synchronization and scheduling, resource management, memory management and virtual memory, and file systems. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 281.
CS-373
Credit Hours:
4
Programming Languages
A systematic examination of programming language features independent of a particular language. Topics include syntax, semantics, typing, scope, parameter modes, blocking, encapsulation, translation issues, control, inheritance, language design. A variety of languages from different classes are introduced. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 281.
CS-374
Credit Hours:
4
Compilers
A study of regular and context-free languages with the purpose of developing theory to build scanners and parsers. The class will develop its own structured language and construct a working compiler. An examination of compiler construction tools. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271).Prerequisites: CS 271, 281, and 334.
CS-375
Credit Hours:
4
Computer Networks
A study of computer network architecture and protocols. Topics include packet and circuit switching, datalink, network and transport layer protocols, reliability, routing, internetworking, and congestion control. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 281.
CS-377
Credit Hours:
4
Database Systems
A study of the design, implementation and application of database management systems. Topics include the relational data model, physical implementation issues, database design and normalization, query processing and concurrency. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 281.
CS-391
Credit Hours:
4
Robotics
An introductory course in both hardware and software aspects of robotics. Students will learn the basics of manipulators, sensors, locomotion, and micro-controllers. Students will also construct a small mobile robot and then program the robot to perform various tasks. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 281.
CS-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Computer Science
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CS-401
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Computer Science
Topics may include Graphics, Neural Networks, Computer Graphics, Neutral Networks, Advanced Algorithms, Network Security or other subjects of current interest.
CS-402
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Computer Science
Topics may include Graphics, Neural Networks, Computer Graphics, Neutral Networks, Advanced Algorithms, Network Security or other subjects of current interest.
CS-403
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Computer Science
Topics may include Graphics, Neural Networks, Computer Graphics, Neutral Networks, Advanced Algorithms, Network Security or other subjects of current interest.
CS-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
CS-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
DANC-122
Credit Hours:
2
African/Diasporan Dance I
African/Diasporan Dance I focuses on African-centered forms of dance in one of many possible genres across the African Diaspora (e.g., traditional African forms, dances of the African Diaspora, African American vernacular, Hip-Hop, Contemporary African, etc.). Taught from a cultural perspective, this course emphasizes fundamentals such as fluidity, use of the head, spine and pelvis, grounded and weighted qualities, isolations and complex embodied rhythms. Concert attendance, short written critical responses and weekly written journals are examples of outside work that is required. Cross-listed with Black Studies. No previous dance experience is expected.
DANC-132
Credit Hours:
2
Modern/Postmodern Dance I
Modern/Postmodern Dance I is designed for students with no dance experience. Offering an introduction to basic movement ideas, classes are structured with initial floor warmup sequences, followed by standing exercises and phrase work. Students will be challenged with selfawareness while moving and to develop a basic understanding of and sensitivity to dynamics, phrasing, gravity and weight, and to become attentive to their own movement potential. Exercises emphasizing placement, flexibility and strength are taught. Attention to the body, breath, momentum and the use of gravity for efficiency is emphasized and improvisation is introduced. In addition to movement work, class time may include video viewings of moments in modern dance history, short readings, creative movement projects and quizzes. Concert attendance, short written critical responses, and short composition assignments are examples of outside work that is required.
DANC-174
Credit Hours:
4
Dance as an Art Form
Understanding Dance as an Art Form is open to students with an interest in dance in practice and in theory. It serves to introduce students to the many sub-disciplines and theoretical approaches in the field of dance. No dance experience is necessary. Students might sample modern/postmodern, African/Diasporan dance, or other forms dependent on the faculty's areas of expertise while considering dance as a historio-socio-cultural mode of expression within a fine arts agenda. Whenever possible, field trips to live concerts will be included and are required as additional "texts" for this course. Students should be prepared to commit to 2-4 field trips over the course of the semester.
DANC-194
Credit Hours:
2-4
Special Topics in Dance
DANC-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Dance
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
DANC-210
Credit Hours:
4
Seminar in Production
Seminar in Production focuses on many aspects of dance concert production. Topics covered include budgeting, marketing, graphic design, costume design/construction, lighting design for dance, box office and house management, video documentation, scheduling and backstage production. Professionals/faculty will make presentations in the various subfields. Students will collaborate in the production of major department-sponsored events. Limited readings are assigned. A portfolio of completed work is required.
DANC-211
Credit Hours:
.5-2
Performance Workshop
The technical aspects of producing a concert are applied through practical experience. Performance space preparation, generally termed the "load-in" (hanging lights, laying the floor and building audience space) and the designing of lights, costumes, and publicity are taught or deepened by means of application. Students are awarded credit based on the number of hours of involvement. Students with Seminar in Production (DANC 210) or similar appropriate training or experience will be given preference in this course.
DANC-222
Credit Hours:
2
African/Diasporan Dance II
African/Diasporan Dance II focuses on African-centered forms of dance in one of many possible genres across the African Diaspora (e.g., traditional African forms, dances of the African Diaspora, Hip-Hop, African American vernacular, contemporary African, etc.). Taught from a cultural perspective, this course deepens exposure to fundatmentals and aesthetics with complex phrasing and multi-laytered movement. Emphasis is placed on fluidity, use of the head, spine, and pelvis, grounded and weighted qualities, isolations and complex embodied rhythms. Limited work outside the classroom is required. Examples include concert attendance, focused relative research inquiries, weekly journal writing, and video essays. Cross-listed with Black Studies 222. Level II is only open to students with previous dance experience in any genre.
DANC-232
Credit Hours:
2
Modern/Postmodern Dance II
Modern/Postmodern Dance II is designed for students with a sound background in dance training and a general understanding of placement and basic dance movements. Classes are structured with initial floor warm-up sequences, followed by standing exercises and phrase work. Students will be challenged with self-awareness while moving and to develop a basic understanding of and sensitivity to focus, dynamics, phrasing, gravity and weight, and distinct movement qualities, and to become attentive to their own movement potential. A focus on flow, spherical space and the ability to move in and out of the floor will be integral to this class, as will clarity and efficiency of movement. Limited work outside the classroom is required. Examples include concert attendance, focused historic/cultural research inquiries, weekly journal writing, and video essays. Level II is only open to students with previous dance experience in any genre.
DANC-274
Credit Hours:
4
Cultural Studies
We will frame Western concert dance as a complex political activity made public through various agendas of race, creed, national origin, sexuality, and gender. Students may simultaneously be exposed to poststructuralist epistemology, feminist theory, and power & justice ideology while they are meeting a survey of historical works. In this way, the course is less about coming to know a canon of "masterworks" and more about learning how to interrogate dance in many cultures from multiple perspectives. Students will be expected to engage in movement activities as a method toward an embodied understanding of theory, but will not be evaluated on their movement performance or ability. No dance experience necessary. May be cross-listed with Women's Studies, Black Studies and/or Queer Studies.
DANC-284
Credit Hours:
4
Choreographic Investigations
This course focuses on the regular creation and presentation of assigned short movement studies that focus on principles of dance composition for the concert stage. Through solo, duet and group forms students learn about the compositional elements of space, time, dynamics, flow and shape, discover their own unique movement style, become familiar with how the body works and how it can be expressive, and expand their own definitions of dance. Three fundamental aspects of creative work in movement will be emphasized: movement invention, compositional structure, and creating meaning. A desire to take risks and be transformed, a willingness to use the body as an expressive tool, an eagerness to learn, and willingness to question personal choices are essential for success in this class. An interest, ability and a desire to be physically challenged to work toward expressive clarity in movement, is assumed. Pre-requisite: 100 level movement course.
DANC-285
Credit Hours:
4
African Movement Aesthetics
This course engages characteristics and values of African movement to investigate compositional structure. Through various exercises and assignments, students examine concepts such as: balance, walking, masking, rhythm, repetition, improvisation, standing and sitting as tools for composing. Students investigate the manipulation of space, time and energy, and create source material from personal movement exploration, structured improvisation, master classes, and guided exercises. Other course tools include videos, journals, art and community feedback. Ultimately, the course aims to resource the aesthetics of African movement (kinesthetic, philosophical, linear and nonlinear) as methods for composing solo, duet, and group work. Prerequisite: Any 100 level or above movement course or permission of instructor.
DANC-286
Credit Hours:
4
Improvisation in Performance
Improvisation in Performance focuses on the act of spontaneous choreography and composition though solo and ensemble work with the goal of understanding and experiencing improvisation in performance work. Students learn Ensemble Thinking techniques and are exposed to Contact Improvisation. Texts include performances in theatre and dance both here and in Columbus, as well as selected readings. Students discover, through these, what artists and scholars consider to be the perimeters of performance, the definition of improvisation, and the unique potential of movement. Through a consistent practice, students fine-tune their own ideas about these and work to discover their own movement preferences and capabilities. Students risk the act of moving, revealing, performing, and improvising. The semester culminates in an improvised performance work developed by the class. Pre-requisite: Any 100 level or above movement course or permission of instructor. (Not offered 2013-2014)
DANC-287
Credit Hours:
4
Site-Based Composition
In this course, students study and research composition for the human body in relation to its environment, placing and shaping the body in juxtaposition or in relation to specific and chosen spaces. We study site-based performance works by contemporary artists and learn about the issues surrounding this kind of work. The underlying principles of this course are the formal elements that inform the aesthetics of composition, noticing how these basic compositional elements create tension, drama and meaning and can point to content that is inherent in the form and in relation to the environment. The final project is the creation of a site-based movement/performance work in a chosen site in the Denison Community/Granville Village area that is presented at the end of the semester. An interest in and curiosity about the body as the subject of creative work is essential. Pre-requisite: Any 100 level or above movement course or permission of instructor. (Not offered 2013-2014)
DANC-288
Credit Hours:
4
Text/Voice-based Composition
This course engages text, voice, and theatrical material to investigate dance making and performance. Students explore words, poetry, music and sound to craft and support movement. Through various exercises and assignments, the course examines motifs such as: speaking while moving; chanting while moving; words into movement; and words as music as methods for composing. Work outside the classroom is required. Examples include concert attendance, creative writing, weekly journal writing, and video essays. Ultimately, the course aims to overlap the boundaries of theatre and dance to explore movement composition. Prerequisite: Any 100 level or above movement course or permission of instructor. (Not offered 2013-2014)
DANC-294
Credit Hours:
2-4
Special Topics in Dance
From time to time, according to the expertise of the faculty and the interest of the students, special courses that can address intensive study are arranged and offered. This course can be taken more than once for credit. Courses recently offered are Dance/Draw, Contact Improvisation, Music for Dance, Creative Collaboration in the Arts, Modernism Re-Composed, and "Music/Movement/Interaction." Whether this course substitutes in the major or minor for an "area study," and if so for which one, depends on the topic. Generally, these courses will fulfill a major or minor requirement
DANC-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Dance
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
DANC-322
Credit Hours:
2
African/Diasporan Dance III
African/Diasporan Dance III focuses on African-centered forms of dance in one of many possible genres across the African Diaspora (e.g., traditional African forms, dances of the African Diaspora, African American vernacular, Hip-Hop, contemporary African, etc.). Taught from a cultural perspective, it is designed for students with significant experiences in African/Diasporan dance technique. This course approaches technique holistically and provides students with the rigorous practice required for performance. Emphasis is placed on fluidity, use of the head, spine, and pelvis, grounded and weighted qualities, isolations, and understanding or complex embodied rhythms. Because this course meets approximately 6 hours per week, little outside work is required. Cross-listed with Black Studies 327. Permission of instructor required.
DANC-332
Credit Hours:
2
Modern/Postmodern Dance III
Modern/Postmodern Dance III is designed for students with significant experience in modern, postmodern, or contemporary dance training. This course provides the student with the rigorous training required for performance, demands an attitude that anticipates professionalism, and will continue to develop strength, flexibility, endurance, and sensitivity to gravity, momentum and phrasing. A willingness to think broadly about movement, to be open to new perspectives and possibilities and to take risks and be fully engaged without knowing exactly what you are doing will be essential and encouraged. This class will focus on process and will ask students to consider how they move and why. Students will be challenged to discover their own movement potential and methods for accomplishing physical tasks. Permission of instructor required.
DANC-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Individual pursuits in (1) composition/improvisation/choreography, (2) history/cultural studies/criticism, (3) somatics/systems of movement re-education, or (4) movement analysis/reconstruction, under the supervision of a faculty member. Only those students who have had the initial coursework in that pursuit may apply.
DANC-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Individual pursuits in (1) composition/improvisation/choreography, (2) history/cultural studies/criticism, (3) somatics/systems of movement re-education, or (4) movement analysis/reconstruction, under the supervision of a faculty member. Only those students who have had the initial coursework in that pursuit may apply.
DANC-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
DANC-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
DANC-374
Credit Hours:
4
Somatics I
Through various approaches to learning (memorizing factual information, sharing personal body-centered stories, drawing evocative and descriptive images, and moving through guided developmental movement explorations), students are introduced to anatomy and kinesiology in their own bodies. The course materials approach the body primarily from a first-person stance through different kinds of movement activities in relation to reflexes and developmental material through skeletal, muscular, and neurological systems. Students are required to keep weekly journals, work in small study groups in and out of class, and create a series of personal bodywork sessions for themselves to illustrate their command of anatomical and kinesiological terminology and reasoning based on the principles of basic neurological patterns.
DANC-375
Credit Hours:
4
Somatics II
This course will guide students on an extended journey deep into their own somatic experiences. The course materials are designed each time this course is offered to employ various somatic practices centered on individual movement challenges. Students are required to keep weekly journals, work in semi-private explorations both in and out of class, and create a series of personal bodywork sessions for themselves to illustrate their progress. Prerequisite: Dance 374.
DANC-384
Credit Hours:
4
Laban Movement Analysis
Students explore aspects of Effort, Shape, Space, and Body as defined in the Laban tradition. Materials focus on observing, analyzing, and recording any kind of human movement practice. All students should expect to create movment studies and to motif their work as part of this inquiry. Interest in creating and observing qualities of movement practice is essential. Dance experience is helpful, but not required.
DANC-385
Credit Hours:
4
Labanotation
Students explore aspects of Direction, Level, Timing, and Part of the Body Moving as defined in the Laban tradition. Students should expect to read movement studies from several different dance genres, including folk, ballet, modern, and postmodern dance in Western and non-western traditions. Short movement studies will be recorded. Those wishing may take the International Elementary and/or Intermediate Certification exam at the conclusion of this course. Previous dance experience is certainly helpful, but not required.