ECON-418
Credit Hours:
4
Consumer Economics
Consumer economics focuses upon the application of economic theory to major issues faced by consumers in our modern economy. The course will combine economic theory, practical skills drawn from finance and Internet search strategies to empower students to make informed and rational decisions. The first half of the course will focus on buying and borrowing. The second half of the course will deal with investing and the risk versus expected reward tradeoff. The goal is not to learn what decisions to make, but rather to understand how economic theory can allow one to make better choices. Prerequisite: 301.
ECON-419
Credit Hours:
4
Mathematical Macroeconomics
This course is specifically designed to be a stepping stone to graduate school. It makes extensive use of mathematical notation and relies heavily upon calculus. About 40 percent of the course is devoted to applying calculus tools to topics previously covered in Intermediate Macroeconomics. Calculus and intensive mathematical modeling allow insights not available with the tools of intermediate theory. About 60 percent of the course is devoted to more advanced topics that are drawn from macroeconomics and investment theory. Prerequisites: 301 and 302 and MATH 121 or 123.
ECON-421
Credit Hours:
4
Public Finance
A study of the impact of governmental taxation and expenditures on the economy. The economic rationale for the existence of the public sector is examined and the development, passage, and implementation of the federal budget is investigated. Issues such as welfare reform, the growth of entitlement programs, the financing of health care and the theory and practice of taxation are studied. Prerequisite: 302.
ECON-422
Credit Hours:
4
Industrial Organization and the Public Control of Business
This course examines corporate decision making as a function of the competitive environment in which the firm operates. In addition to standard market structure theory, we examine a number of business practices including pricing and advertising policy, corporate strategic behavior, and horizontal and vertical mergers and acquisitions. The analysis is often mathematical, with a heavy emphasis on game theory. Prerequisites: 302 and MATH 121 or 123.
ECON-423
Credit Hours:
4
International Trade
The new wave of globalization has brought international trade issues to the forefront of both economics and society. This course will analyze the causes and consequences of international trade. The theory of international trade and the effects of trade policy tools will be developed in both perfect and imperfect competition, with reference to the empirical evidence. This will allow us to address many essential questions such as the patterns of trade, the welfare impact of trade, and protectionism. The frameworks developed in this course will also serve as a context for a discussion of several important contemporary issues, including the relationship between trade and economic growth, income inequality, the importance of the World Trade Organization, and the effects of free trade agreements. Prerequisite: 302.
ECON-424
Credit Hours:
4
Labor Economics
This course develops the basic theories of labor supply and demand. Using these theories we examine the institutional forces that the government, unions, and corporate powers have on wages and hours worked. A specific focus of the course is spent analyzing competing theories that explain the wage differentials that exist in the U.S. labor markets. Prerequisite: 302.
ECON-425
Credit Hours:
4
Racial and Ethnic Groups and the U.S. Economy
This course examines the roles that various racial and ethnic groups have played in the development of the U.S. economy. Historical forces in conjunction with economic and political institutions have created a unique position for each of these groups. An examination of the causes and consequences for the economy and particular groups of these interlocking forces will be examined. Prerequisite: 302. (Not offered 2013-2014)
ECON-426
Credit Hours:
4
Urban and Regional Economic Development
This course will introduce, develop and analyze the types of and importance of the linkage between the regional economics and their urban subsystems. The topics to be developed include the economic variables which may be used to explain differential rates of economic change in selected regions and the impact of such changes on the pattern of economic growth and the quality of life in urban or metropolitan areas. Prerequisite: 302. (Not offered 2013-2014)
ECON-427
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Economics
This course provides an examination of various economic issues facing business and government regarding the use of natural resources and the management of environmental quality. Students will develop an understanding of both the economic nature of environmental problems and the economic tools necessary to explore and devise potential policy solutions for environmental problems. In addition, students will examine the institutional framework within which environmental problems exist in order to understand those factors which may mitigate against economic solutions. Prerequisite: 302.
ECON-429
Credit Hours:
4
Mathematical Microeconomics
This course explores the mathematical foundations of microeconomics. Constrained and unconstrained optimization are employed to generate the results of consumer theory, producer theory and market structure. The course is particularly well suited for those students contemplating graduate study in economics or business. Prerequisites: 302 and MATH 121 or 123.
ECON-440
Credit Hours:
4
Topical Seminars in Economics
Open to advanced students with the consent of the instructor. These courses will involve the preparation of a research paper and be offered in a variety of applied economic fields. Prerequisites: 301 and 302.
ECON-441
Credit Hours:
4
Political Economy of the Middle East
A study of the general features of the economic development experience of the Middle East. This course will note the elements of similarity and the extent of diversity among the economies of the region, and will examine the strategies of planning and patterns of economic development in these economies. We will study the structural transformation of these economies and the dynamics of their relations with the colonial and modern West. We will examine the interactive relation between economic policymaking and class formation, as well as the economics of internal and international migration. OPEC and the oil market, and the economics of war, occupation and sanction. In the past decades, many Middle Eastern countries have been confronted with an Islamic revivalist movement that seeks to transform the economic organization of society according to what has been proposed as "Islamic economics." In this course we will study the theoretical basis of various interpretations of Islamic economics and will examine their policy and planning proposals. Prerequisites: 301 and 302.
ECON-442
Credit Hours:
4
Forensic Economics
After an untimely death or a wrenching divorce, forensic economics are often called upon to estimate the economic worth of a human life or a family business. To make such estimations requires that students have a firm understanding of the underlying micro- and macroeconomic aspects of economic theory, of the relevant demographic and economic data that is available, and of the process of calculating net discounted present value. There are generally accepted ways of calculating economic worth, but there are also grey areas where judgments are made. The latter requires a subtle understanding of the issues behind why one assumption may be better than another and its impact on the final value of economic worth. Students will role-play a movie forensic economist who is a member of a well-respected law firm specializing in wrongful death and divorce. Prerequisites: 301 and 302. (Not offered 2014-2015)
ECON-445
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Theory Seminars
ECON-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Research in selected topics in Economics.
ECON-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Research in selected topics in Economics.
EDUC-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Education
A general category used only for the evaluation of transfer credit.
EDUC-213
Credit Hours:
4
The U.S. Education System
Students will develop a thorough and systematic understanding of the development of education and schooling in the United States. Relationships between school and society will be analyzed primarily from a historical perspective. Themes include the connection between liberty and literacy, centralized versus local control of schools, expansion of schooling, inequities in schooling, and the differentiated curriculum.
EDUC-220
Credit Hours:
4
Approaches to Environmental Education
Environmental education is a broad term, encompassing a large array of ideas concerned with the purpose of and approach to engagement with the physical environment that should ultimately lead to environmental stewardship. Approaches to Environmental Education will address the "what" and "how" of environmental education. Students will be exposed to the various definitions and purposes of environmental education as well as the multiple approaches used to achieve these purposes. Through readings and hands-on experiences we will explore multiple practices in the field. Finally, we will develop our own environmental education curriculum based on our experiences in the class.
EDUC-245
Credit Hours:
4
Technology & Learning
This course will explore a variety of technology (emphasis on multi-media and Web 2.0 tools) so students interested in the field of education will not only become proficient in the practical use of technology, but determine when technology is appropriate, how it can be used to enhance learning and how to assess its usefulness in the academic setting. This course will include a combination of discussion, lecture, video, and hands-on computer work. Attendance at evening lectures may be required.
EDUC-249
Credit Hours:
4
The Learner and the Teacher: Childhood
This course explores the learning-teacher process in the elementary grades. Topics for the course include learning theories, developmental patterns of the young child, learning profiles, differentiated instruction, and methods of teaching. This course includes a three-hour commitment each week to an area school classroom. The student will complete a variety of activities that focus on the learner, the teacher and the learning-teaching process, using the school experience as a "laboratory" to gather primary sources of information. A fee is required for state-mandated background check. Normally offered Spring semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.
EDUC-250
Credit Hours:
4
The Learner and the Teacher: Adolescence
This course explores the learning-teaching process in middle and high school environments. Topics draw from neuroscience research on learning, multiple intelligence theory, and scholarship on issues regarding peer socialization, mental health, body image, gender and sexual identity, and active participation strategies. This course includes a three-hour commitment each week to an area school classroom or community agency. The student will complete a variety of activities that focus on the learner, the teacher, and the learning-teaching process, using the school or agency experience as a "laboratory" to gather primary sources of information. A fee is required for state-mandated background check. Normally offered Fall semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.
EDUC-270
Credit Hours:
2
General Methods of Teaching
This course is designed to extend students' understanding of the discipline of teaching and provide in-depth practice of strategies introduced in previous courses. Elements include planning, instructional strategies, assessment, motivation, student groupings and classroom management. Assignments require students to put course concepts into practice. Normally offered Spring semester. Prerequisite: EDUC 249 or EDUC 250.
EDUC-280
Credit Hours:
1-2
Field Experience
The student may request to apprentice in a local school, social service agency, or non-profit organization with a teacher or other supervisor. The student will observe and provide assistance in the setting and confer regularly with the Field Experience Coordinator through journaling and class meetings. A fee is required for state-mandated background check. Normally offered Fall Semester. Prerequisite: EDUC 249 or EDUC 250.
EDUC-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Education
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
EDUC-300
Credit Hours:
4
Philosophy of Education
In this course students consider questions regarding how people learn and the role of education in society from a philosophical perspective. Class members read primary works of selected educational theorists including Plato, Isocrates, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Dewey, and Martin. Students develop a familiarity with major educational themes of the past and engage current issues and problems in education. Normally offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: EDUC 213.
EDUC-312
Credit Hours:
4
Literacy and Learning: Theory and Practice
The purpose of this course is to explore reading and writing in schools, communities, and families. Emphasis is placed on theories of literacy and learning as a way to think about classroom instruction, variation in reading and writing as social practices, and policies and position statements surrounding these practices. The course includes a 20-25-hour service-learning commitment in an area school or community organization. Normally offered Fall semester. Prerequisites: EDUC 249 or 250.
EDUC-330
Credit Hours:
4
Gay and Lesbian Issues in Education
In this seminar students will examine gay and lesbian issues in what is, arguably, the most central social institution in American culture. We will begin with an introduction to the study of sexuality, and read critical texts in the queer history of education. Turning to the contemporary landscape, the course addresses legal issues regarding sexuality in the United States as they pertain to schooling. Normally offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: EDUC 213 or QS 101.
EDUC-345
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics
Independent study or seminar work on selected topics under the guidance of staff members. Prerequisite: Consent of chairperson.
EDUC-346
Credit Hours:
1-4
Special Topics
Independent study or seminar work on selected topics under the guidance of staff members. Prerequisite: Consent of chairperson.
EDUC-360
Credit Hours:
4
History of African American Education
The goal of this course is to examine the historical experiences of African Americans in education and related aspects of life. Much of the course will focus on Blacks' experiences in schooling in the South from Reconstruction to the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. In addition, students will contrast African American schooling experiences with those of Native Americans and others during this period. Students who enjoy and benefit from cooperative and participatory learning environments are encouraged to take this course. Prerequisite: EDUC 213 OR BLST 235.
EDUC-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
EDUC-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
EDUC-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
EDUC-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
EDUC-390
Credit Hours:
4
Critical Pedagogy: Gender, Race and Class in U.S Education
In its examination of current pressing issues in U.S. education, the central concern throughout this course is the relationship between school and society. Particular attention is given to pedagogies informed by critical theory. The course includes a 25-30-hour service-learning or field placement commitment in an area school or community organization. Prerequisite: EDUC 213.
EDUC-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Education
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
EDUC-421
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Seminar
Students will build upon knowledge and understanding of selected topics developed in previous coursework in education, develop the skills required in the process of doing research and preparing work for presentation or publication, and reflect upon study in the major through a culminating portfolio assignment. Prerequisites: Senior standing in Educational Studies.
EDUC-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
EDUC-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
ENVS-101
Credit Hours:
4
People and the Environment
A systematic introduction to multifaceted environmental problems facing the world today, primarily through the lenses of both the social science and humanities. The course provides an overview of solutions to present challenges through governmental action, collective effort, and personal initiative. We engage in the interdisciplinary study of the relationship between humans and the environment, looking at local, regional, and global scales. At the local level, the class may explore campus-level environmental issues, such as local food sources, recycling and energy use. We develop ideas about campus "greening," new technologies, and behavioral factors. At a global scale, we might investigate global climate change and the human dimension of its causes and solutions. Students will undertake research projects, debate topical issues, sleuth for information, think critically, and present findings to disparate audiences. Fulfills the "I" Interdisciplinary requirement. Note: Does not fulfill the "Q" or "Y" General Education Requirement.
ENVS-102
Credit Hours:
4
Science and the Environment
This course provides an introduction to the biogeochemical aspects of environmental problems. Students will gain an understanding of the structure and function of ecological communities, as well as the non-living factors that regulate ecological change. Global chemical cycles are presented as a unifying theme for human interactions with nature and are the basis for discussion of environmental problems associated with agriculture, water use, global climate change, energy source, atmospheric change, land and resource use, and waste disposal. The laboratory component of the course exposes students to methods of measuring and monitoring environmental quality. Labs include experiential introductions to ecological relationships, toxicology, water and soil analysis, and geographic information systems. Students will apply concepts of experimental design, statistical sampling, and data analysis to evaluate environmental questions. Fulfills the "QY" General Education Requirements. Note: A score of 4 or 5 on the AP Environmental Sciences waives this requirement for the ENVS Major or Minor.
ENVS-190
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics Environmental Studies
ENVS-196
Credit Hours:
4
Varieties of Environmentalism
What is environmentalism? How is environmentalism practiced in the developed First World (the North) and the developing Third World (the South)? What are the similarities and differences of environmentalism in the North and the South? How is environmentalism related to issues of human inequality on bases such as race, class, gender, caste, and nationality? What are the causes and consequences of environmental change: who pays the costs and who receives the benefits? How do intra-human questions of justice intersect with inter-species questions of justice? ENVS Social Science.
ENVS-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Topics in Environmental Science
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ENVS-200
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Geology
A broad survey of the geologic aspects of environmental issues, emphasizing human interactions with the geologic environment. Topics include geologic hazards, such as earthquakes, landslides and flooding; global water supply and water quality issues, especially groundwater contamination and remediation; and global environmental change, with emphasis on climate change and global warming. Prerequisites: A 100-level course taught by a Geoscience faculty. (Normally offered Spring Semester) ENVS Natural Science.
ENVS-202
Credit Hours:
4
Ecology and Evolution
This course explores the fundamental concepts of ecology and evolution and integrates them in a study of the interactions between organisms and their environment and how those interactions shape the history of life on Earth. With a thorough understanding of population genetics and natural selection, this course addresses ecological questions at the level of the individual, population, community and ecosystem. A common thread that binds the course is the role of deterministic and stochastic processes in shaping ecological systems and macroevolutionary patterns. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or Consent of Instructor. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. ENVS Natural Science.
ENVS-205
Credit Hours:
4
Religion and Nature
An investigation of the religious value of nature in Christianity and Buddhism, particularly in America and Japan. We look at how people in these cultures have viewed the place of humanity within the world of nature, and the relationships among humanity, God and nature. ENVS Humanities.
ENVS-212
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Chemistry
A study of the chemistry of the atmosphere, natural water, and soils with a special focus on acid precipitation, greenhouse gases, ozone depletion, urban and indoor air pollution, water and soil pollution, solid and hazardous waste disposal and risk assessment. Prerequisites CHEM 121-122. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. This course can count towards a minor in chemistry. Safety glasses required. (Offered every other year in spring semester only) ENVS Natural Science.
ENVS-220
Credit Hours:
4
Approaches to Environmental Education
Environmental education is a broad term encompassing a large array of ideas concerned with the purpose of and approach to engagement with the physical environment that should ultimately lead to environmental stewardship. This course addresses the "what" and "how" of environmental education. Students will be exposed to the various definitions and purposes of environmental education as well as the multiple approaches used to achieve these purposes. Through readings and hands-on experiences we will explore multiple practices in the field. Finally, we will develop our own environmental education curriculum based on our experiences in the class. ENVS Methods or Social Science.
ENVS-222
Credit Hours:
2
Geographic Information Systems I
This course is an introduction to the concepts and uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with particular application to environmental issues. The course consists of laboratory exercises on GIS data structures and sources of data, on the use of specific GIS tools, and on practical applications of GIS to real-world tasks. The student will gain skills in spatial data analysis, map generation, and data presentation using ArcGIS software. (Also offered as GEOS 222). After successful completion of this course, students who wish to develop advanced GIS skills may enroll in ENVS/GEOS 223. Satisfies half of an Environmental Methods requirement.
ENVS-223
Credit Hours:
2
Geographic Information Systems II
This course is intended to give the student experience with advanced GIS applications. The focus will be on novel analyses of spatially explicit data pertaining to real-world environment issues (Also offered as GEOS 223). Prerequisite: ENVS/GEOS 222. Completion of 222 & 223 satisfies Environmental Methods requirement.
ENVS-225
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Psychology
An examination of the relationship between the environment and psychological processes. Topics examined in this course include how the character and the design of our environments can affect psychological well-being, and how certain ways in which we perceive and think can constrain our efforts to comprehend and confront environmental problems. Other topics explored are early environmental experiences and development, environmental stressors such as crowding and noise, territoriality and privacy, environmental aesthetics, cognitive maps and way-finding behavior, effects of institutional size on performance, and attitudes toward the natural environment. Prerequisite: PSYC 100. ENVS Social Science.
ENVS-240
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Politics and Decision Making
This course gives students a chance to explore the realm of proactive change in the environmental arena. It combines the theories of policy, the tools of problem solving, and the practice of dealing with environmental challenges in the real world of American government. The premise of the course is this: if you want to improve the state of the planet, you have to propose a solution. To make a solution happen, you should understand the process of getting an idea through the decision-making system. Effecting change requires a background in the system(s) that make things happen, whether you ultimately want to work within the system or outside it. This course is divided into two main components: an overview and implementation of problem solving techniques, and an in-depth examination of the U.S. Congress' role in environmental policy formation. The latter section culminates in a "Moot Congress" undertaken by students at the end of the semester. Prereq: ENVS 101. This is a core course in the ENVS major and minor. Not recommended for first year students. Fulfills the "R" Oral Communication requirement. ENVS Methods or Social Science.
ENVS-244
Credit Hours:
4
Environment, Technology and Society
This course analyzes the social causes and consequences of environmental change. We explore the relationship among production, consumption, population, technology, and environment. We ask: do the social benefits of economic growth outweigh environmental costs? Does population growth lead to environmental problems? Can technical "fixes" solve environmental problems? Are "indigenous" technologies superior to "western" technologies? We'll also analyze human responses to change: policy and regulation, "green" capitalism, environmental movements, and environmental countermovements. We ask, how can we shape our future? What alternatives are likely and possible? Will the U.S. experience ecotopia or ecocide in the years to come? Will the Third World become the First World's dumping ground or will sustainable development provide environmental equity? This course is cross-listed with Sociology/Anthropology and has a prerequisite of either S/A 100 or ENVS 101. ENVS Social Science.
ENVS-256
Credit Hours:
4
Farmscape: Visual Immersion in the Food System
Every human being has an intimate relationship with food, often with deep emotional facets. Yet we in the U.S. know very little about the food system that sustains us - it is a mysterious and often invisible set of processes, organizations, and people. This remarkably complex web of inputs, labor, machinery, laws, subsidies, mergers, and so many other components is one that we take largely for granted. This class seeks to align that reality with another: we are an intensely visual species. A critical part of our existence that we experience through all of our senses is one we fail to comprehend through our primary sense. And we have this occasion to use sight in a formalized way - photography - to tell new stories, and to bring an artistic sensibility to our understanding of food, and perhaps ourselves. Through imagery, writing, and the curatorial process of exhibiting our work in a public setting, we have a truly unique opportunity. Our immersion in these critical issues can bring full circle the understanding we gain through many eyes to enhance awareness in other people about the ways in which our food system connects us all together. No prerequisites. Satisfies arts/humanities or methods component of the ENVS major.
ENVS-260
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Ethics
This course investigates the question of our ethical relations and responsibility to objects and systems in the natural world, including animals, other living beings, non-living entities, ecosystems, and "nature" as a whole. It also asks about nature as such: what nature is, what the place in it is of humans, the role of human action in transforming nature, etc. The question of the relation of the natural to the social will receive special attention. Prerequisite: One previous course in Philosophy or Environmental Studies or consent. (Fall) ENVS Humanities.
ENVS-262
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Dispute Resolution
An in-depth investigation of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) as an improved means to affect change in environmental conflict. Both an intellectual and hands-on introduction to the theory and practice of ADR, relying on research into theoretical aspects of conflict, attendance at both conventional litigatory and ADR hearings, and actual participation in ADR exercises. Fulfills University's "R" general education requirement. Prerequisite: ENVS 101 or 102. ENVS Methods or Social Science.
ENVS-265
Credit Hours:
4
Human Rights, Indigenous Rights, Environmental Rights
This course explores two on-going global debates among academics, activists and policy-makers within the concept of human rights: (1) To what extent should human rights be limited to a narrow range of clearly defined individual rights, and to what extent should they be expanded to cover a larger range of individual and collective rights? (2) Are indigenous communities necessarily better environmental stewards, and so does the extension of rights to these communities lead to better environmental protection? ENVS Social Science
ENVS-274
Credit Hours:
4
Ecosystem Management
Many of Earth's ecosystems are stressed and degraded as a result of human activities. Ecosystem management is the process of evaluating the biotic and abiotic features of ecosystems and stressors and manipulating those features toward a defined goal, such as conservation or restoration. In this course, students will apply aspects of systems ecology to management scenarios in particularly stressed ecosystems. Students will gain an understanding of systems ecology and will learn how ecological communities function within ecosystems and landscapes. After establishing this foundation, students will lead the exploration of some of our planet's greatest ecological systems. Lab sessions will give the students an opportunity to construct a computer-based simulation of an ecosystem and to apply ecological modeling as a management tool in both lab and field settings. ENVS Natural Science.
ENVS-284
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Planning and Design
This course examines a variety of local environmental planning processes and issues, focusing primarily on the communities surrounding Denison (Granville, Licking County), as well as the theories, concepts and tools of design, both at a community level and for individual buildings. Particular attention will be paid to controversial models of architecture and planning in order to understand some of the negative implications of conventional approaches. Field trips, group exercises, research and project competitions will form the basis for course evaluation. Prerequisite: ENVS 101 or 102 or consent. ENVS Methods or Social Science.
ENVS-290
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Environmental Studies
This course provides students with an opportunity to investigate particular environmental issues from diverse perspectives within the discipline. Environmental challenges and solutions of local, national and/or global scales are addressed, often with a hands-on and interactive format. This course is offered on an irregular basis with unique topics in each version: students may enroll in this course more than once.
ENVS-291
Credit Hours:
4
Nature and the Literary Imagination
A study of humanity's relationship with and shifting conceptions of the nonhuman world. Reading selections vary, but generally include past and contemporary writers who reflect different ethnic and regional outlooks and who work in various modes, including literature, memoir, natural history and science. ENVS Humanities.
ENVS-301
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Practicum
This keystone course is primarily for ENVS majors; minors are welcome. This course provides the opportunity for students to gain hands-on experience working on real-world environmental problems. As a group, students work in an intensive format with a real "client" and real deadlines to research a problem, assess options, recommend solutions, and evaluate outcomes. Examples of projects include energy and water conservation, local land use planning, wetlands managements, reuse/recycling programs, agriculture preservation, and environmental education. (should be taken junior year). Prerequisites: ENVS 101 and 102; ENVS major or minor.
ENVS-310
Credit Hours:
4
Wetland Ecology
This course is a comprehensive study of wetland ecology, management, and policy. The main emphasis is on biological, chemical, and physical aspects of major wetland ecosystems found in North America. The course also deals with valuation, classification, and delineation of wetlands. A significant portion of the course focuses on local and regional wetland ecosystems: their history, ecology, and current status. Labs will be field-based explorations of the biology, chemistry, and ecology of these regional wetlands. Prerequisite: BIOL 202 or consent. ENVS Elective.
ENVS-328
Credit Hours:
4
Politics of the Global Environment
This course is about the theoretical, political, and practical problems associated with environmental action. Course materials analyze various theoretical perspectives on the relationship between humans and nature, and they illustrate how different ethics lead to widely different prescriptions for personal and political action. Course materials also offer examples of how environmental problems have in fact been addressed or not by governmental, non-governmental, and international institutions. This is not a course on the physical processes of environmental problems, but rather it emphasizes the political, economic, and theoretical contexts within which efforts are made to act on environmental threats. No prior knowledge of environmental or political science is required. However, students should be prepared to read and interpret detailed social science texts, to formulate and articulate cogent arguments, and to conduct independent research. ENVS Social Science.
ENVS-334
Credit Hours:
4
Sustainable Agriculture
This course will expose student to the purposes and methods associated with sustainable agriculture. We will do this through readings, discussion and actual experience on local and sustainable farms. Throughout the semester we will reflect on the social, economic and environmental aspects associated with sustainable agriculture as well as actual practices affiliated with the modern sustainable agriculture movement. Students must be prepared to commit to working on farms each week as part of the lab rquirement of this course.
ENVS-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
ENVS-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
ENVS-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ENVS-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ENVS-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Environmental Studies
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ENVS-401
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Senior Project
This course is required for ENVS majors with senior standing unless they are pursuing senior research (ENVS 451/452). This course provides an integrating and culminating experience for students, individually or in small groups, to engage with an environmental issue, either by conducting research related to this issue or by taking action on it in a way that is informed by their academic understanding. The primary objective is to integrate their study of environmental issues at Denison and to develop skills in critically analyzing environmental problems and promoting environmental change. Prerequisite: ENVS 301 or consent of the instructor.
ENVS-427
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Economics
This course provides an examination of various economic issues facing business and government regarding the use of natural resources and the management of environmental quality. Students will develop an understanding of both the economic nature of environmental problems and the economic tools necessary to explore and devise potential policy solutions for environmental problems. In addition, students will examine the institutional framework within which environmental problems exist in order to understand those factors which may mitigate against economic solutions. Prerequisite: ECON 302. ENVS Social Science.
ENVS-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
ENVS-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
INTL-100
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to International Studies: The Making of the Modern World
Introduction to themes, concepts and approaches to International Studies from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course explores key concepts of modernity in the context of specific cultural, political, and economic experiences within a historical framework. This course must be taken before the end of the sophomore year.
INTL-200
Credit Hours:
4
Themes and Approaches in International Studies
The required mid-level course for all International Studies majors. The goals of this course are to expose International Studies majors to some of the key themes and topics within International Studies, and help them shape their individual concentrations in the major. The course also provides opportunities for students to understand various international issues through an interdisciplinary lens, drawing on both political-economic and cultural analytical frameworks. Finally, the students will gain a basic understanding of the academic research process. It must be taken before the end of the sophomore year.
INTL-201
Credit Hours:
1
Major Proposal for International Studies
The required mid-level course is for all International Studies majors. The goals of this one-credit course are to create a vibrant intellectual community of students, in which they collaboratively formulate individual interests in the field of International Studies through discussion and peer-reviews in class, and consultation with the course coordinator (International Studies Program Director) and faculty advisor assigned by the coordinator. Through these processes, the students are expected to not only develop strong camaraderie among them as the new INTL majors, but also formulate comprehensive plans for how they will pursue their interests in International Studies during their final two years at Denison. This involves charting out their courses in International Studies for the next two years-including coursework from off-campus study programs that they wish to count towards the International Studies major. By the end of the course, students submit the major proposal, in which they synthesize coursework, off-campus study (or an internship), and language training in a way that allows them to develop a coherent area of expertise within International Studies, and they will share their goals and plans with their cohort and a wider International Studies community. The proposals will be evaluated by the course coordinator, who consults with the entire International Studies Program Committee.
INTL-250
Credit Hours:
4
Global and Local Flows and Frictions
A mid-level topics course that allows students to build upon concepts and theories introduced in INTL-100 and 200. It explores, in specific and contextualized terms, particular issues associated with global linkages in contemporary and historical contexts. The course takes into account cultural, economic and political factors. The specific topic or theme varies according to the interest of the faculty member teaching the course. Students may take more than one section of this course.
INTL-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in International Studies
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
INTL-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Directed studies are undertaken at the initiative of the student and may involve any topic acceptable to the student and an instructor. Written consent.
INTL-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Directed studies are undertaken at the initiative of the student and may involve any topic acceptable to the student and an instructor. Written consent.
INTL-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
Written consent.
INTL-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
Written consent.
INTL-400
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Capstone Seminar
This seminar integrates the three core courses, the four concentration courses, the off-campus experience, the language training, and the other major into a culminating research project. It focuses on theoretical tools, frameworks and methodologies in International Studies. This seminar emphasizes the development of independent research skills and scholarly writing in connection with a research project based on individual students' interests.
INTL-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
INTL-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
PHED-100
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Physical Education
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
PHED-103
Credit Hours:
.5
Basic Football for Beginners
An introduction to the techiniques and rules required for participation in the sport of football. Offered 2nd quarter, fall semester. .5 credits hours
PHED-105
Credit Hours:
1
Learn to Swim and Dive
PHED-106
Credit Hours:
.5
Learn to Swim and Dive
This class is designed for the student who wants to learn, firsthand, the benefits and methods of aquatic conditioning. After completing this course, the participant will have the knowledge necessary to organize a personal conditioning program for lifetime fitness. The student should have a basic skill level in swimming.
PHED-120
Credit Hours:
.5
Golf
For players on every level. An introduction to the techniques and rules required for participation in the sport of golf. (Offered first quarter, fall semester)
PHED-131
Credit Hours:
1
Racquet Sport
This class will involve the three sports of tennis, racquetball and squash. The primary focus will be on tennis for the first half of the semester, and then racquetball and squash for the second half. During an inclement weather day, the outdoor tennis instruction may be changed to indoor squash or racquetball. (Offered fall semester)
PHED-133
Credit Hours:
1
Badminton
Learn, understand and execute the rules and techniques of Badminton. (Offered fall and spring semester)
PHED-151
Credit Hours:
.5
Soccer
For players on every level. Students will learn basic skills, rules and strategy and apply them during game situations. (Offered spring semester)
PHED-154
Credit Hours:
.5
Basketball
For players on every level. Students will learn the basic skills, rules and strategy and apply them during game situations. (Offered spring semester)
PHED-158
Credit Hours:
.5
Floor Hockey
Students will learn the basic skills, rules and strategy, and apply them in game situations. No previous experience necessary.
PHED-159
Credit Hours:
.5
Speed and Agility Training
This course is intended for any intercollegiate, intramural, or recreational athlete interested in increasing athletic performance and decreasing the chance of injury through an integrated performance enhancement training system. The course will address four major areas to improve athletic speed and agility including but not limited to: general physical preparedness and work capacity, core stabilization and extremity proprioception, muscular force production, and neurological/biomechanical efficiency. At the conclusion of the course, the student should be able to give examples of and effectively perform the following activities: dynamic flexibility; warm-up routine; rapid, short, and long response drills for vertical, linear, lateral, and multi-planar movements; upper and lower body plyometric and ballistic movements; linear, lateral, change of direction; and acceleration speed enhancement drills; and static proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching. (Offered fall and spring semesters)
PHED-160
Credit Hours:
1
Lifetime Fitness
This course will provide the students with exposure to various means by which to become aerobically fit. Some examples include taebo, Windsor Pilates, and aerobics. Aerobic exercise and aerobic fitness, as well as nutrition and basic health and fitness concepts will also be introduced as they relate to "Lifetime Fitness." (Offered fall and spring semesters)