CS-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
CS-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CS-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CS-371
Credit Hours:
4
Algorithm Design and Analysis
In this course, students study in depth the design, analysis, and implementation of efficient algorithms to solve a variety of fundamental problems. The limits of tractable computation and techniques that can be used to deal with intractability are also covered. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271, 275, and junior/senior status.
CS-372
Credit Hours:
4
Operating Systems
A study of the principles of operating systems and the conceptual view of an operating system as a collection of concurrent processes. Topics include process synchronization and scheduling, resource management, memory management and virtual memory, and file systems. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 281.
CS-373
Credit Hours:
4
Programming Languages
A systematic examination of programming language features independent of a particular language. Topics include syntax, semantics, typing, scope, parameter modes, blocking, encapsulation, translation issues, control, inheritance, language design. A variety of languages from different classes are introduced. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 281.
CS-374
Credit Hours:
4
Compilers
A study of regular and context-free languages with the purpose of developing theory to build scanners and parsers. The class will develop its own structured language and construct a working compiler. An examination of compiler construction tools. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271).Prerequisites: CS 271, 281, and 334.
CS-375
Credit Hours:
4
Computer Networks
A study of computer network architecture and protocols. Topics include packet and circuit switching, datalink, network and transport layer protocols, reliability, routing, internetworking, and congestion control. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 281.
CS-377
Credit Hours:
4
Database Systems
A study of the design, implementation and application of database management systems. Topics include the relational data model, physical implementation issues, database design and normalization, query processing and concurrency. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 281.
CS-391
Credit Hours:
4
Robotics
An introductory course in both hardware and software aspects of robotics. Students will learn the basics of manipulators, sensors, locomotion, and micro-controllers. Students will also construct a small mobile robot and then program the robot to perform various tasks. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 281.
CS-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Computer Science
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CS-401
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Computer Science
Topics may include Graphics, Neural Networks, Computer Graphics, Neutral Networks, Advanced Algorithms, Network Security or other subjects of current interest.
CS-402
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Computer Science
Topics may include Graphics, Neural Networks, Computer Graphics, Neutral Networks, Advanced Algorithms, Network Security or other subjects of current interest.
CS-403
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Computer Science
Topics may include Graphics, Neural Networks, Computer Graphics, Neutral Networks, Advanced Algorithms, Network Security or other subjects of current interest.
CS-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
CS-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
GEOS-110
Credit Hours:
4
Physical Geography
The study of earth surface processes and diverse environments around the world. Topics covered include weather phenomena, the distribution of the world's climates, global patterns of vegetation and soils, and the study of landforms. Laboratory exercises include local field trips, the analysis of weather and climate data, the interpretation of topographic maps and aerial photographs, a primer on common minerals and rocks, as well as occasional Google Earth excursions. This course is designed as an introductory course in the geosciences for both science and non-science majors. Fulfills the quantitative (Q) requirement. (Normally offered Fall and Spring semesters).
GEOS-111
Credit Hours:
4
Planet Earth
An introduction to the study of the Earth: how it formed, how it evolved, how Earth systems interact to produce the environment in which we live, how geologists interpret rocks and how humans use earth resources. Laboratory exercises include learning to identify and interpret minerals and rocks, using topographic maps to understand landscapes and landscape processes, and examining volcanic and earthquake hazard and mitigation. This course is designed as an introductory course in the geosciences for both science and non-science majors. Fulfills the quantitative (Q) requirement. (Normally offered Fall and Spring semesters)
GEOS-112
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in the Geosciences
Current topics include: Rare Earth - Building a Habitable Planet. What does it take to build a planet that harbors intelligent life? Are habitable planets common in the Universe, or is Earth the only one? In this course we will examine the development of planet Earth in light of the hypothesis that conditions necessary for a habitable planet are extremely rare in the universe. While emphasizing geology, this examination will involve us in aspects of biology and paleontology, astronomy and astrogeology, philosophy and even theology. Laboratory exercises will allow hands-on investigation of rocks, fossils, geologic maps, and other data important to our understanding of the development of planet Earth. This course is designed as an introductory course in the geosciences for both science and non-science majors. Fulfills the "R" Oral Communication requirement.
GEOS-114
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in the Geosciences
Current Topics include: Climate Change - Cool Science on a Hot Topic. Global warming constitutes one of the most controversial issues you, and society at large, will face in the future. At the center of this debate lies the question, "Are we responsible for the recent increase in global temperature, or is this trend part of the natural variability in the climate system?" To evaluate these possibilities, we will examine the geologic record of climate change and the processes responsible for these variations. While the majority of our discussions will focus on geology, we will also touch on elements of oceanography, meteorology, biology, paleontology, as well as policy and politics. By the end of this course you will be able to make informed decisions about the climate change issues we are certain to face in the future. This course is designed as an introductory course in the geosciences for both science and non-science majors and to fulfill the "Q" Quantitative requirement.
GEOS-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Geosciences
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
GEOS-200
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Geology
A broad survey of the geologic aspects of environmental issues, emphasizing human interactions with the geologic environment. Topics include geologic hazards, such as earthquakes, landslides and flooding; global water supply and water quality issues, especially groundwater contamination and remediation; and global environmental change, with emphasis on climate change and global warming. Prerequisites: A 100-level course taught by Geoscience faculty. (Normally offered Fall Semester)
GEOS-210
Credit Hours:
4
Historical Geology
A survey of the geologic history of planet Earth. Major topics include global climate history, paleogeography, history of life, and tectonic development and evolution of the North America continent. Lab exercises focus on description and interpretation of sedimentary rocks and environments, and the history of biological evolution. Prerequisite: A 100-level course taught by Geoscience faculty. (Normally offered Spring Semester)
GEOS-211
Credit Hours:
4
Rocks and Minerals
An introduction to the minerals and rocks that make up the Earth, and how those materials influence the processes that operate within and on the surface of the planet. The framework of the course is the geological, chemical and physical basis for understanding the composition and physical properties of minerals, magmas and rocks, and the processes by which these materials form. An emphasis is placed on examining the interplay between earth materials, society and the environment. Prerequisite: A 100-level course taught by Geoscience faculty. (Normally offered Fall Semester)
GEOS-222
Credit Hours:
2
Geographic Information Systems I
This course is an introductin to the concepts and uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with particular application to environmental issues. The course consists of laboratory exercises on GIS data structures and sources of data, on the use of specific GIS tools, and on practical applications of GIS to real-world tasks. The student will gain skills in spatial data analysis, map generation, and data presentation using ArcGIS software. (Also offered as ENVS 222). After successful completion of this course, students who wish to develop advanced GIS skills may enroll in ENVS/GEOS 223.
GEOS-223
Credit Hours:
2
Geographic Information Systems II
This course is intended to give the student experience with advanced GIS applications. The focus will be on novel analyses of spatially explicit data pertaining to real-world environment issues (Also offered as ENVS 223). Prerequisite: GEOS 222.
GEOS-240
Credit Hours:
4
Earth Resources
This course examines the Earth resources that humans exploit, including (but not limited to) fossil fuels, uranium, metals, water and soil, from both a geologic and societal perspective. We will study: (1) the geologic processes that form these deposits and control their distribution; (2) the methods used to extract the resources and; (3) environmental impact of extraction and resource use. We will also scrutinize the effect on society of the resource, including conflict, labor, sustainability and class issues. The course will combine lab activities, scientific discussion and readings from academic literature, popular media, and activist propaganda. The end result will be the ability to bring together the science of Earth resources with the broader human context of resource exploitation. Prerequisite: A 100 level course taught by Geoscience faculty or consent of instructor.
GEOS-250
Credit Hours:
4
World Regional Geography
Modern geography explores the complex linkages between the natural world and the human or "built" environment. In this course, we study these relationships from a regional viewpoint. Excluding Anglo America, we tour the world's regions examining the diversity of landscapes, the distributions of natural resources, and the patterns of agricultural land use and industrial development. From London to Lhasa we chart the growing interdependence of the world economy and the stark contrasts in resource availability and allocation between the developed and less-developed nations. This course provides a fundamental understanding of people's material relationships with each other and the Earth.
GEOS-252
Credit Hours:
4
Geography of North America
A regional geographic study of North America, focusing on climate, landforms, and natural resources as they relate to patterns of human settlement, land use, transportation and economic activity.
GEOS-260
Credit Hours:
4
Weather and Climate
An introduction to the atmosphere and its complex dynamics on local to global scales. Topics include earth-sun relationships and global energy budgets, remote sensing of the atmosphere, large-scale atmospheric circulation, mid-latitude weather from thunderstorms and tornados to large winter storm systems, the observation, measurement and prediction of local weather, global climate patterns, and the controls and impacts of global climate change both today and in the recent geologic past.
GEOS-270
Credit Hours:
4
Oceanography
This course will provide students with an introduction to the world's oceans. Topics will include: the sea floor and its sediments; the physical properties and chemistry of seawater; ocean circulation; waves and tides; life in the seas; and environmental issues and concerns facing the oceans today. By the end of this course students will have explored many of the basic concepts in modern oceanography, and should be able to integrate new concepts and data into their developing knowledge of the Earth.
GEOS-280
Credit Hours:
4
Global Tectonics
A study of geologic and tectonic processes at the global scale. Major topics include plate tectonic theory and development, topography and geology of the sea floor, plate geometries and processes at plate margins, volcanic arcs, collisional orogenies and mountain building, and the influence of tectonic processes on earth history. Prerequisite: 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. (Normally offered Spring Semester in alternate years)
GEOS-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Geosciences
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
GEOS-300
Credit Hours:
4
Geomorphology
The systematic study of earth processes and landform development in tropical, temperate, arid and polar environments. We examine the range of surface processes including weathering, slope erosion, river and wind activity, and present and past glaciers to help understand landform evolution through recent geologic time. Particular emphasis will be given to the glacial and temperate environments of the north-central United States during the late Quaternary. Prerequisites: GEOS 200 or consent of instructor. (Normally offered Fall Semester in alternate years).
GEOS-305
Credit Hours:
4
Hydrogeology
A systematic study of surface water pathways from rain to rivers, groundwater flow, groundwater resources and groundwater chemistry. Our emphasis will be geologic, examining the range of rocks and sediments and the dynamics of water movement through them. We study well hydraulics to characterize local aquifers and then expand to regional groundwater systems. We then examine the groundwater chemistry of different aquifer systems and a range of groundwater contamination issues. Prerequisite: GEOS 200 or 300 or consent of instructor. (Normally offered Spring Semester in alternate years)
GEOS-308
Credit Hours:
4
Biodiversity Through Time
An introduction to the study of fossil invertebrates with emphasis on preservation, taphonomy, diversity trajectories through geologic time, evolutionary mechanisms, extinction, paleobiology and paleoecology. Special emphasis will be placed on using fossils to interpret ancient depositional environments. Labs will introduce the student to the major invertebrate phyla commonly preserved in the geologic rock record. Prerequisite: GEOS 210 or BIOL 202. (Normally offered Fall Semester in alternate years)
GEOS-311
Credit Hours:
4
Structural Geology
Study of the deformation of the Earth's crust. How and why rocks deform; geometry and interpretation of folds, faults, and rock fabrics; regional tectonics and mountain building. Labs emphasize interpretations of geologic structures in hand specimens, outcrops and geologic maps; and includes opportunities for geologic field mapping and a weekend field trip to the Appalachian fold and thrust belt. Prerequisite: 210 or 211 or consent of instructor.
GEOS-312
Credit Hours:
4
Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
An examination of the processes that produce igneous and metamorphic rocks. The course emphasizes the reasoning and approaches used to understand rock-forming processes, including field geology, petrography, geochemistry and petrologic modeling. The key topics include the formation of magmas in different tectonic settings, the physical processes of volcanism and using metamorphic reactions to assess the tectonic history of rocks. Prerequisite: GEOS 211 or consent. (Normally offered Spring Semester in alternate years)
GEOS-314
Credit Hours:
4
Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
This course is an introduction to sedimentary processes and sedimentary rocks. The course will cover three major areas: (1) physical sedimentology (how sedimentary rocks are formed); (2) depositional systems (where sedimentary rocks are formed and how they differ from place to place); and (3) stratigraphy (how sedimentary rocks are used to solve geological problems). Labs will expose students to sedimentary rocks under the microscope, in hand sample, and in the field. Prerequisite: 210. (Normally offered Fall Semester in alternate years.
GEOS-320
Credit Hours:
4
Geochemistry
An introduction to geochemical principles focusing on surface processes and low temperature geochemistry. Major topics include nucleosynthesis, differentiation of the crust, low-temperature aqueous geochemistry, light stable isotope fractionation, long and short-term carbon cycles, and chemical evolution of the oceans and atmosphere. Prerequisite: Chemistry 131 or permission of the instructor. Normally offered in alternate years.
GEOS-340
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Geosciences
GEOS-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Individual readings and laboratory work in a student's field of interest within the Geosciences.
GEOS-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Individual readings and laboratory work in a student's field of interest within the Geosciences.
GEOS-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
GEOS-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
GEOS-380
Credit Hours:
1
Geoscience Senior Seminar
This course is designed to help majors apply what they have learned throughout their undergraduate careers to a real-world issue or topic in the geosciences. The seminar will meet weekly with all members of the Geoscience faculty. The seminar topic will be selected by the entire geosciences faculty. Both students and faculty will be responsible for presenting summaries of weekly readings, although the majority will be presented by students. The course will be organized and administered by the department chair. Geoscience majors with senior standing or permission of instructor. (Normally offered Spring Semester)
GEOS-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Geoscience
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
GEOS-400
Credit Hours:
4-8
Field Course
A B.S. major in Geosciences must register for an approved summer field course offered by any one of a number of universities. Upon the successful completion of the course, the student receives credit transferable to their record at Denison.
GEOS-401
Credit Hours:
2-4
Selected Topics in Geoscience
An advanced seminar or problem-oriented course which involves a semester-long investigation of such topics as field techniques in geosciences, advanced structural geology, geochemistry, or geomorphology.
GEOS-402
Credit Hours:
2-4
Selected Topic in Geography
An advanced seminar or problem-oriented course which involves a semester-long investigation of a global perspective in such issues as ocean resources and territorial rights, population growth, and food needs. Prerequisite: A 200-level course or permission of instructor.
GEOS-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
GEOS-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
MATH-102
Credit Hours:
4
Elements of Statistics
An introduction to statistical reasoning and methodology. Topics include experimental design, exploratory data analysis, elementary probability, a standard normal-theory approach to estimation and hypothesis testing and linear and multi-variable regression. Not open for credit to students who have taken Psychology 370. (Offered each year)
MATH-120
Credit Hours:
1-4
Special Topics in Mathematics
Variable topics involving: mathematical methods for the Natural and Social Sciences and Mathematical Problem Solving.
MATH-121
Credit Hours:
4
Essentials of Calculus
A one-semester introduction to single-variable differential and integral calculus and selected topics in multi-variable calculus. Emphasis is given to applications from the natural and social sciences. (Offered each semester)
MATH-122
Credit Hours:
4
Mathematical Methods for the Physical and Social Sciences
This course will explore three major topics of mathematics: linear algebra, probability and statistics, and Markov chains. Using these three topics, students will engage in three real world applications in biology, chemistry, and economics. This course is well suited for students who need a year of mathematics, like many pre-professional programs, and are looking for real applications of mathematics beyond the typical algebra and calculus approach. While this course would be a natural extension for pre-professional students who have take Math 121 Essentials of Calculus, this course only requires a strong background in high school Algebra II.
MATH-123
Credit Hours:
4
Calculus I (Single Variable)
An accelerated introduction to the calculus of single variable functions. Topics include limits, derivatives, integrals, and applications of calculus to the natural and social sciences. Prerequisite: Placement or Math 121. (Offered each semester)
MATH-124
Credit Hours:
4
Calculus II (Multivariable)
A continuation of the study of single variable calculus, together with an introduction to linear algebra and the calculus of multivariable functions. Topics include: an introduction to infinite sequences and series, vectors, partial and directional derivatives, gradient, optimization of functions of several variable, integration techniques, double integrals, elementary linear algebra, and an introduction to differential equations with applications to the physical and social sciences. Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB or BC score of 4 or 5 or Math 123. (offered each semester)
MATH-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Mathematics
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
MATH-200
Credit Hours:
4
Topics in Mathematics
(Also listed under Computer Science offerings.)
MATH-210
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Proof Techniques
An introduction to proof writing techniques. Topics will include logic and proofs, set theory, mathematical induction, relations, modular arithmetic, functions, cardinality, number theory, and calculus. Prerequisite: Math 124. (Offered each semester)
MATH-215
Credit Hours:
1
Technical Communication I
This course aims to enhance mathematics and computer science students' proficiency and comfort in orally communicating content in their disciplines. Students will present three talks during the semester on substantive, well-researched themes appropriate to their status in their major. Prerequisite: Math 210 or CS 271. (Offered each year)
MATH-231
Credit Hours:
4
Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
A continued study of Linear Algebra with applications to linear differential equations and mathematical models in the physical and social sciences. Topics include abstract vector spaces over the real and complex numbers, bases and dimension, change of basis, the Rank-Nullity Theorem, orthogonal bases, linear transformations, the matrix of a linear transformation, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, diagonalization, the matrix exponential, linear differential equations of order n, linear systems of first order differential equations, and a continued study of infinite series, power series, and series solutions of linear differential equations. Prerequisite: Math 124. (Offered each semester)
MATH-232
Credit Hours:
4
Mathematical Modeling
A course in mathematical modeling including linear and nonlinear optimization models, linear and non-linear dynamic models, and probability and statistical models. Both continuos and discrete models are considered. This course focuses on applying mathematics to open ended, real world problems, and effectively communicating conclusions. Sensitivity analysis and model robustness are emphasized throughout. This course also strongly features approximation and simulation methods along side analytic methods. Prerequisite: MATH 231. (Offered each spring)
MATH-242
Credit Hours:
4
Applied Statistics
Statistics is the science of reasoning from data. This course will introduce you to the fundamental concepts and methods of statistics, including calculus-based probability. Topics include experimental design, data collection, and the scopes of conclusion, a robust study of probability models and their application to statistical inference, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis. Prerequisite: Math 124. (Offered each fall)
MATH-275
Credit Hours:
4
Elementary Graph Theory
Graphs are mathematical structures that are used to model a great variety of phenomena ranging from the internet to social networks to phylogenetic clusters, In this class, we will study the mathematical properties of graphs and develop algorithms to solve many common graph problems. Prerequisite: CS 109 or 110 or 111 and 174 or MATH 210. (Offered each spring)
MATH-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Mathematics
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
MATH-315
Credit Hours:
1
Technical Communication II
This course is a capstone experience in oral and written communication for mathematics and computer science majors. Students will research a substantive topic, write a rigorous expository article, and make a presentation to the department. Prerequisite: Math/CS 215. Corequisite: a 300-400 level mathematics or computer science course. (Offered each semester)
MATH-321
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Analysis
A rigorous analysis of limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, uniform convergence, infinite series and basic topology. Prerequisites: Math 210, 231. (Offered every other fall)
MATH-322
Credit Hours:
4
Topology
A study of general topological spaces, including interiors, closures, boundaries, subspace, product, and quotient topologies, continuous functions, homeomorphisms, metric spaces, connectedness, and compactness together with applications of these concepts. Additional topics may include algebraic topology, including homotopy and homology groups, and/or a parallel study of general measure spaces, including inner and outer measure. Prerequisite: Math 321 or permission of instructor. (Offered every other spring)
MATH-329
Credit Hours:
4
Complex Analysis
An introduction to complex numbers, analytic functions, derivatives, singularities, integrals, Taylor series, Laurent Series, conformal mappings, residue theory, analytic continuation. Cauchy-Riemann Equations, Cauchy's Theorem, Cauchy Integral Formula, Big and Little Picard Theorems, Riemann Mapping Theorem, Rouche's Theorem. Prerequisite: Math 210, 231. (Offered every other year)
MATH-331
Credit Hours:
4
Combinatorics
The basic ideas of sets and functions are used to explore the three basic problems in combinatorics: the counting problem, the existence problem, and the optimization problem. Topics may include: combinatorial proof, the principle of inclusion-exclusion, induction, generating functions, recurrence relations, the Pigeonhole principle, Ramsey theory, basic graph theory, shortest path problems, minimum spanning tree problems, transversal theory, and graph coloring. Prerequisite: Math 210. (Offered every other year)
MATH-332
Credit Hours:
4
Abstract Algebra
A rigorous analysis of the structure and properties of abstract groups, rings, fields, and vector spaces. Prerequisites: Math 210, 231. (Offered every other fall)
MATH-334
Credit Hours:
4
Theory of Computation
This course is a study of formal languages and their related automata, Turing machines, unsolvable problems and NP-complete problems. Prerequisites: CS 109 or 110 or CS 111 and Math 210 or CS 174.
MATH-337
Credit Hours:
4
Operations Research
This course involves mathematical modeling of real-world problems and the development of approaches to find optimal (or nearly optimal) solutions to these problems. Topics include: Modeling, Linear Programming and the Simplex Method, the Karush-Kuhn Tucker conditions for optimality, Duality, Network Optimization, and Nonlinear Programming. Prerequisite: Math 231. (Offered every other fall)
MATH-341
Credit Hours:
4
Applied Probability
A study of single variable, multi-variable, and stochastic probability models with application to problems in the physical and social sciences. Includes problems in Biology, Finance, and Computer Science. Prereqs: Math 231.
MATH-357
Credit Hours:
4
Vector Calculus and Fourier Analysis
A study of vector calculus, Fourier series, and Fourier transforms together with applications to ordinary and partial differential equations and mathematical models in the sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 231. (Offered every other fall)
MATH-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
MATH-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
MATH-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
MATH-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
MATH-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Mathematics
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
MATH-400
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Mathematical Topics
Advanced topics in Abstract Algebra, Analysis, Geometry or Applied Math.
MATH-401
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Mathematical Topics
Advanced topics in Abstract Algebra, Analysis, Geometry or Applied Math.
MATH-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
MATH-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
NEUR-200
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Neuroscience
A survey of the interdisciplinary field of Neuroscience, covering the "basics" of Neuroscience. Beginning with an overview of the philosophy and historical contributions to modern Neuroscience, the course examines the evolution of Neuroscience as a discipline and the importance of interdisciplinary perspectives in Neuroscience. Cellular function (neurophysiology) is then examined, including the characteristics of the neuron ("at rest" and when active, ionic movements into and out of the neuron, refractory periods and ion transport mechanisms. The course then presents a nueropharmacology, including receptor subtypes, neurotransmitters, post-synaptic potentials and drugs that act to alter/modify neural function. The general structure of the nervous system is covered, including an in-depth examination of the major nuclei, fiber tracts and "connections" in the brain. Spinal cord and peripheral nervous system anatomy is also presented. Note: This course has a mandatory 3-hour weekly lab meeting. Prerequisite: BIOL 150. Pre- or corequisite: PSYC 100. (Offered spring semester of odd-numbered years)
NEUR-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Neuroscience
A general category used only the evaluation of transfer credit.
NEUR-400
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Neuroscience
A continuation of NEUR 200. Designed for juniors and seniors. Course focuses on the more "molar" aspects of Neuroscience, with participation by several Neuroscience faculty and discussions of primary literature. Includes discussions of sensory and motor systems, hormonal control of behavior, memory and learning, neurodevelopment, neuropathology and neuroimmunology. Students will engage in discussions of primary literature. (Offered spring semester of even-numbered years)
NEUR-401
Credit Hours:
Neuroscience Assessment
Satisfactory completion of NEUR 401 is required of all senior neuroscience concentrators. NEUR 401 is a zero credit course.
NEUR-450
Credit Hours:
1-4
Special Advanced Topics in Neuroscience
This course provides a venue in which to explore chosen topics in neuroscience at the advanced level. Topics vary according to the interests of students and faculty.
NEUR-499
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Neuroscience
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
PHYS-100
Credit Hours:
4
Current Topics in Physics
Designed principally for students not contemplating a major in the sciences, but who nevertheless wish to develop their ability to figure things out about the physical world for themselves. Recently, the course has focused on the physics of societal concerns such as energy and the environment. The laboratory, an integral part of the course, will serve to introduce the student to the observation, measurement, and analysis of phenomena directly related to topics studied in the course. Open to seniors by consent only. Mathematical preparation is assumed to include high school algebra and geometry. (Not offered every year)
PHYS-121
Credit Hours:
4
General Physics I
This calculus-based course is designed to provide a thorough quantitative coverage of the foundations and concepts of Physics and its approach toward an understanding of natural phenomena. Newtonian Mechanics and Dynamics, fluids, and thermal physics are covered. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Math 121 or 123 or concurrent. (Fall Semester)
PHYS-122
Credit Hours:
4
General Physics II
This calculus-based course is designed to provide a thorough quantitative coverage of the foundations and concepts of Physics and its approach toward an understanding of natural phenomena. The course includes electricity and magnetism, optics and waves. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite: PHYS 121. (Spring Semester)
PHYS-125
Credit Hours:
4
Principles of Physics I
This course is designed for first-year students who intend to major in physics or pre-engineering. The goal of Physics 125 is to stimulate interest in physics by exposing students to topics that are at the current frontiers of physics and to help students develop quantitative reasoning and analytical skills that are necessary for further study in physics. Topics possibly covered include relativity, particle physics, cosmology, QED, and basic quantum mechanics. The course satisfies the quantitative reasoning requirement and is intended to help students make a smooth transition from high school math and physics courses to our Principles of Physics course (126-127). Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Math 121 or Math 123 or concurrent. (Fall Semester)
PHYS-126
Credit Hours:
4
Principles of Physics II
This course is designed to provide a thorough quantitative understanding of the principles of physics and its approach toward investigating natural phenomena and the universe around us. This calculus-based sequence is primarily designed for those interested in physics, astronomy and pre-engineering. This course satisfies the quantitative reasoning requirement and is also appropriate for those majoring in other physical sciences (see also Physics 121-122). Topics include Newtonian mechanics, vibrations, fluids, and thermal Physics. Four lectures and one three-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Physics 125, Math 123 or concurrent. (Spring Semester)
PHYS-127
Credit Hours:
4
Principles of Physics III
This course is designed to provide a thorough quantitative understanding of the principles of physics and its approach toward investigating natural phenomena and the universe around us. This calculus-based sequence is primarily designed for those interested in physics, astronomy and pre-engineering. This course is also appropriate for those majoring in other physical sciences. (also see Physics 121-122). Topics include electricity and magnetism, waves, and optiocs. Four lectures and one three hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Physics 126 and Math 124 or concurrent. (Fall Semester)
PHYS-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Physics
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
PHYS-200
Credit Hours:
4
Modern Physics
A quantitative study of topics in modern physics including relativistic kinematics and dynamics, interactions between light and matter, an introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics, and atomic physics. Additional topics may include solid-state physics, nuclear physics, or other contemporary topics. Analytical techniques are emphasized throughout. Prerequisites: Physics 122 or 127, Physics 201 or concurrent or consent. (Spring Semester)