ASTR-100
Credit Hours:
4
Current Topics in Astronomy
This course is designed primarily for the non-physics major student who wishes to better understand the nature of the universe. Topics will be chosen from such areas as the history of astronomy, naked eye observations, the planets and moons, the origin of the solar system, stellar classification, stellar evolution, galactic astronomy, and cosmology. Course and laboratory work will explore the physical and observational background for these topics with an emphasis on the quantitative nature of modern astronomy. Two or three lectures per week; one two-hour laboratory each week. This course satisfies the quantitative reasoning general education requirement. No previous training in physics is required, however mathematical preparation is assumed to include high school algebra and trigonometry. (Offered each semester)
ASTR-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Astronomy
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ASTR-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Astronomy
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ASTR-311
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Astronomy
This course is to provide qualified students with the opportunity to pursue experimental and/or theoretical work in one or more of the areas of Modern Astronomy. Prerequisite: PHYS 122 or 127 and PHYS 200 concurrent or consent. (Not offered every year)
ASTR-312
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Astronomy
This course is to provide qualified students with the opportunity to pursue experimental and theoretical work in one or more of the areas of Modern Astronomy. Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent. (Not offered every year)
ASTR-340
Credit Hours:
1-2
Advanced Topics
Independent work on selected topics at the advanced level under the guidance of individual staff members. May be taken for a maximum of four semester hours of credit. Prerequisites: Junior standing and consent of chairperson.
ASTR-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Prerequisite: Consent of chairperson.
ASTR-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Prerequisite: Consent of chairperson.
ASTR-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ASTR-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ASTR-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Astronomy
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ASTR-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Prerequisite: Physics 312 or consent of chairperson.
ASTR-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Prerequisite: Physics 312 or consent of chairperson.
BIOL-100
Credit Hours:
4
Modern Topics in Biology
This course for non-majors is intended to promote scientific literacy. Topics will vary with the instructor, but each edition of the course will focus on a specific topic as a vehicle for exploring the essentials of biology and the scientific method. This course satisfies the G.E. lab science requirement. Biology 100 may not be counted toward the major in biology. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly.
BIOL-103
Credit Hours:
4
Modern Topics in Biology
This course for non-majors is intended to promote scientific literacy and quantitative reasoning. Topics vary with the instructor, but each edition of the course will focus on a specific topic as a vehicle for exploring the essentials of biology and the scientific method. This course satisfies the G.E. lab science requirement as well as the quantitative reasoning requirement. Biology 103 may not be counted toward the major in biology. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly.
BIOL-104
Credit Hours:
4
Modern Topics in Biology
This course for non-majors is intended to promote scientific literacy and oral communication. Topics will vary with the instructor, but each edition of the course will focus on a specific topic as a vehicle for exploring the essentials of biology and the scientific method. This course satisfies the General Education lab science requirement as well as the oral communication requirement. Biology 104 may not be counted toward the major in biology. Class meets for two (80 minute) or three (50 minute) periods per week plus a three-hour laboratory.
BIOL-110
Credit Hours:
4
Biology and Politics of Women's Health
This course examines critical conversations in the biology, politics, culture, and history of women's health. The nation's greatest health issues include, but are not limited to, unmanaged chronic conditions (including cardiovascular health), environmental health risks and cancer, racial and ethnic health disparities, women's reproductive and sexual health, and the epidemic of obesity. Evaluating the complexities of these "women's health" issues involves both scientific literacy and socio-cultural literacy. This course provides a fundamental understanding of how biological system structures and functions are related, specific to the female human body. The laboratory component of this course familiarizes students with the scientific method, feminist theory in science, and methods in women's health research. This course promotes proficiency in oral communication through practice in a variety of formats that typically occur in biology and women's studies. Cross-listed with WMST 110.
BIOL-150
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to the Science of Biology
This course is the first biology course biology majors take and is not recommended for non-majors. It is a course that introduces students to core concepts of modern biology through active participation in biological investigations. Topics include reproduction, Darwinian evolution, energetics, organisms' response to stimuli, and organismal structure and function. Imbedded throughout the course are many of the skills expected of practicing biologists including the ability to develop hypotheses and analyze and interpret data, the ability to present scientific data, scientific writing, and a familiarity with the scientific literature. This course satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.
BIOL-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Biology
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
BIOL-201
Credit Hours:
4
Cell and Molecular Biology
The study of cellular structure and function from a molecular perspective. The organization and molecular composition of cells is examined, with a particular emphasis on distinctions between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic domains. Major cell functions studied include membrane transport, signal transduction, and eukaryotic cell cycle regulation. The molecular basis of genetic expression is addressed, including topics such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, and associated regulatory processes. Evolution is also explored from the perspective of cellular and molecular biology. Prerequisites: BIOL 150 or consent of instructor. Chemistry 131 pre- or co-requisite. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.
BIOL-202
Credit Hours:
4
Ecology and Evolution
This course explores the fundamental biological concepts of ecology and evolution and integrates them in a study of the interactions between organisms and their environment and how those interactions shape the history of life on Earth. With a thorough understanding of population genetics and natural selection, this course addresses ecological questions at the level of the individual, population, community and ecosystem. A common thread that binds the course is the role of deterministic and stochastic processes in shaping ecological systems and macroevolutionary patterns. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or consent of instructor. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.
BIOL-250
Credit Hours:
1 or 2
Minor Problems
A research problem (library or laboratory) of limited scope which provides the opportunity for the qualified student to extend his or her interest beyond the limits of particular course offerings. Does not count toward minimal department requirements.
BIOL-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Biology
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
BIOL-300
Credit Hours:
Biology Assessment I
A pass/fail course used to track all biology majors' completion of the required assessment exam covering the Biology core. Earning the required S (pass) in this course entails attending an information session explaining the exam and taking the assessment exam in good faith. Offered Fall and Spring semesters.
BIOL-301
Credit Hours:
Biology Assessment II
A pass/fail course used to track all biology major's completion of the required senior interview. Earning the required S (pass) in this course entails attending an information session explaining the biology department's senior interview and completing the senior interview in good faith. Seniors enroll in BIOL 301 in their last semester at Denison.
BIOL-308
Credit Hours:
4
Biodiversity Through Time
An introduction to the study of fossil invertebrates with emphasis on preservation, taphonomy, diversity trajectories through geologic time, evolutionary mechanisms, extinction, paleobiology and paleoecology. Special emphasis will be placed on using fossils to interpret ancient depositional environments. Labs will introduce the student to the major invertebrate phyla commonly preserved in the geologic rock record. Prerequisite: GEOS 210 or BIOL 202. (Normally offered Fall Semester in alternate years)
BIOL-309
Credit Hours:
4
Computational Biology
As large and complex data sets have become more prevalent in biology, computer algorithms for analyzing the data have become critical, driving the need for scientists with expertise in both fields. This interdisciplinary course will explore this intersection, examining the biology and the computational methods behind a variety of interesting and important problems. Students will initially work with a single instructor to build a background outside of their own discipline (Biology students with a Computer Science instructor, CS students with a Biology instructor), followed by a merging of the two groups into a single team-taught class, which will investigate a series of biological problems with a computational focus. The laboratory portion of the course will involve students working together in multidisciplinary groups to design algorithms to investigate these problems, as well as undertaking a self-designed "capstone" project at the end of the term. Prerequisites: Biology core and one of CS 109 or CS 110 or CS 111 or consent.
BIOL-310
Credit Hours:
4
Wetland Ecology
This course is a comprehensive study of wetland ecology, management, and policy. The main emphasis is on biological, chemical, and physical aspects of major wetland ecosystems found in North America. The course also deals with valuation, classification, and delineation of wetlands. A significant portion of the course focuses on local and regional wetland ecosystems: their history, ecology, and current status. Labs will be field-based explorations of the biology, chemistry, and ecology of these regional wetlands. Prerequisite: BIOL 202 or consent.
BIOL-312
Credit Hours:
4
Herpetology
Herpetology is the study of amphibians and reptiles, two diverse taxonomic groups that share the characteristic of being ectothermic vertebrates. This course will examine three main areas of herpetology: 1) the evolutionary relationships and biogeographical histories of these taxonomic groups, 2) comparative physiology, and adaptations of amphibians and reptiles to their natural environments, and 3) the ecology of the herpetofauna, as well as conservation issues, with a focus on amphibians. Emphasis will be placed on the critical reading of primary literature on both historical and current issues in herpetology, as well as on gaining hands-on experiences with amphibians and reptiles. Laboratories will include comparative studies of physiology and field studies of native Ohio amphibians and reptiles, making extensive use of the Denison University Biological Reserve. Prerequisites: Biology core or consent. Herpetology qualifies as a "biological diversity" course for the major.
BIOL-313
Credit Hours:
4
Vertebrate Zoology
In this course we investigate the biology of vertebrates. In particular, we will be considering the many ways in which vertebrates interact with and respond to their environment, and thus this course will emphasize the evolution, ecology, and physiology of vertebrates. Laboratories will focus on the biology of local vertebrates, and will consist of field and laboratory exercises, as well as field research projects. We will make extensive use of the Denison University Biological Reserve. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent. Vertebrate Zoology qualifies as a "biological diversity" course for the major. This course satisfies the Oral Communication requirement.
BIOL-315
Credit Hours:
4
General Microbiology
This is an introductory course in microbiology emphasizing the general structure, occurrence, habitats, and types of bacteria, viruses, and eukaryotic microbes. Mechanisms of pathogenicity and host defense strategies also are discussed. The course structure includes small group activities, student presentations, traditional lectures, and discussions of scientific literature. Laboratory emphasis is placed on the fundamental techniques of microbiology (i.e., staining, microscopy, and streak plating) and self-designed investigative labs. Students may either take General Microbiology (BIOL 315) or Diversity of Microorganisms (BIOL 317) during their academic career, but not both courses. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-316
Credit Hours:
4
Virology
Virology is a course that will examine the diversity of plant, animal, and bacterial viruses. Emphasis will be placed on topics such as molecular interactions between the host and virus, the genetics and chemical nature of viruses, and the replication strategies of viruses. This course also will examine how viruses cause disease, how they are used in biotechnology, and their overall impact on society. The structure of the course will provide peer learning activities, class discussions of primary literature, and traditional lectures. The structure of the laboratory will allow students to develop and test their own hypotheses while learning bacteriophage and tissue culture techniques. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-317
Credit Hours:
4
Diversity of Microorganisms
This course examines the remarkable environmental, physiological, and metabolic diversity of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, protists, algae, & fungi). More specifically, diversity will be studied in terms of taxonomy and phylogeny, the ability of species to live in various environments, and the application and value of genomics in diversity. Emphasis will be placed on the reading of primary literature, and on using that information to make connections with class lectures and generate hypotheses that will be tested in the laboratory. The structure of the course includes traditional lectures, class activities, and student presentations. Prerequisite: BIOL 150, 201, & 202, or consent. Diversity of Microorganisms qualifies as a "biological diversity" course for the major and minor. Students may either take General Microbiology (BIOL 315) or Diversity of Microorganisms (BIOL 317) during their academic career, but not both courses.
BIOL-320
Credit Hours:
4
Plant Systematics
In Plant Systematics students learn how major groups of vascular plants are classified, named, and identified. We study approximately 50 plant families concentrating on native representatives (using living plant material whenever possible), learn how to use keys and floras to identify local species, and learn how to find information about plants in traditional and electronic sources. Understanding evolutionary relationships among the families studied is a central theme. This course provides important background for students planning to do fieldwork in ecology, plant-animal interactions, environmental education, and related subjects. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent. Plant Systematics qualifies as "biological diversity" course for the major.
BIOL-321
Credit Hours:
4
Plant Ecology
In this course we will explore how plants interact with their environments and with other organisms, including man. We will begin at the individual level, learning how plants obtain resources from abiotic sources and through mutualistic interactions with bacteria and fungi. We will also consider how the theories of plant community ecology developed in the early 20th century and why they are pertinent today. Students will also have the opportunity to read and critique primary literature from leading journals in the field. Finally, we will develop several projects to be completed at the Denison Biological Reserve during the term for lab projects. These projects will be student-inspired and driven, with the hopes that they will contribute to our understanding of our immediate surroundings at Denison. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-324
Credit Hours:
4
Developmental Biology
Every multicellular organism begins its life as a single cell. Developmental biology is the study of the progression from this single cell to a complex, multicellular organism. Recently the powerful tools of molecular biology have linked the fields of embryology and genetics to reveal how cells, tissues, organs, and organisms develop. Especially striking is the conservation of molecules and mechanisms that underlie developmental processes in different organisms. This course provides an overview of the major features of early embryonic development in animals, and the mechanisms (molecular mechanism when known) that underlie them. We focus on two major aspects of developmental biology: (1) How is the basic body plan established? How does the basic organization of the embryo arise from the fertilized egg? What are the cellular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis and the appearance of pattered structures in the embryo? (2) How do parts become different in the embryo? Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-325
Credit Hours:
4
Genetics
This course provides a detailed and up-to-date understanding of genetics, an appreciation of how genetics affects our lives everyday from the supermarket to the doctor's office, and a realization of the applications of genetics to virtually every discipline of biology. We focus on three major areas of genetics: (1) Molecular genetics: Thinking about genetics on the DNA level - everything from DNA sequencing to mutagen testing. (2) Mendelian genetics: Thinking about genetics on the gene level-everything from inheritance to recombinational mapping. (3) The application of both molecular and Mendelian genetics to study biological processes. We start by seeing how genetic techniques can be used to dissect almost any biological process and end up answering questions such as: How does genetic disease screening work? How are genes cloned from complex organisms such as mice or even humans? How does gene therapy work? In the laboratory we carry out both molecular experiments and classical genetic experiments. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-326
Credit Hours:
4
Plant Evolution and Reproduction
In this course we will explore the evolutionary relationships and histories among the major groups of plants, both terrestrial and aquatic. We will pay particular attention to their modes of reproduction and the structures that facilitate gamete production and dispersal. We will learn how plant physiology and developmental mechanisms have allowed taxa to persist or make major transitions among different environments over time. Class reading material will consist of the primary literature and will be presented by students every week. For the laboratory component we will have one overnight trip to Hocking Hills on a weekend in September to examine and identify plants in their natural habitat, as well as shorter trips to Blackhand Gorge and the Dawes Arboretum. We will also plan together and complete a semester-long project on the effects of environment on the development of reproductive structures in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. Plant Evolution and Reproduction qualifies as a "biological diversity" course for the major. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-327
Credit Hours:
4
Biology of Insects
In this course we will explore the world of insects and their interactions with other species. Our central focus will be to survey insect diversity and explore how various orders, families, and species are adapted through evolution to their specific environment. But we will also use that diversity as a lens through which we will examine major concepts in biology. Topics of discussion will include the following: plant-insect coevolution, mating systems, anti-predator defenses, eusocial behavior, parasitism, disease transmittance, insect conservation, and control of agricultural pests. Laboratory will involve collecting insects in the field (including at times outside of class hours), identification, and preparing a collection. Biology of Insects qualifies as a "biological diversity" course for the major. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-334
Credit Hours:
4
Comparative Physiology: Human and Non-Human Animals
This course is a comparative study of how humans and other animals perform their life-sustaining functions. We will explore the physiology of the cardiovascular, nervous, muscular, and endocrine systems, as well as examining key homeostatic functions such as thermoregulation, osmoregulation, and energy utilization. This course will examine the adaptive significance of physiological traits at the molecular, tissue, organ and whole organism level in humans and a variety of non-human animals. Students will participate in course labs and design their own physiology experiments. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-336
Credit Hours:
4
Invertebrate Zoology
Invertebrates constitute more than 97% of all animal species on Earth. They are an incredibly diverse group of organisms that have been classified into more than 30 phyla, each with unique anatomical, physiological, and behavioral traits. In this course, we explore the evolutionary history of invertebrates, and how these traits evolved as adaptions for specific terrestrial, aquatic, and/or marine environments. We examine certain taxa in greater detail to address major concepts in biology; this is done in conjunction with article discussions and laboratory exercises that involve a variety of approaches in both the lab and field. Students have the opportunity to complete at least one self-designed experiment by the end of the semester. Invertebrate Zoology qualifies as a "biological diversity" course for the major. Prerequisites: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-340
Credit Hours:
4
Animal Behavior
In this course we study the proximate and ultimate causes of animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Topics include the genetic, developmental and neural bases of behavior as well as behavioral strategies of habitat choice, foraging, defense, courtship, parental care and sociality. The laboratory will include several multi-week experiments designed to test hypotheses concerning behaviors observed in the field and lab. There will be a strong emphasis on data analysis and interpretation, and use of the primary literature. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-341
Credit Hours:
4
Immunology
This course is a study of concepts in immunology, focusing on the cellular and molecular aspects of the immune system in humans and other animal models. We will delve into subjects allowing students to understand the fascinating and complex mechanisms with which our immune systems defend our bodies against a constant barrage of infectious microorganisms. Topics covered include immune cell development and function, specific and non-specific immune responses to infection, immunogenetics, vaccination, and clinical disorders of the immune system such as allergies, immunodeficiency diseases, and autoimmunity. Laboratory exercises will utilize immunological techniques to address questions pertaining to the molecular function and specificity of the immune system. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-345
Credit Hours:
4
Eukaryotic Cell Biology
This course will be an in-depth examination of fundamental cellular functions, with an emphasis on how disturbances in these functions lead to disease. Areas covered in the course include intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton and cell motility, adhesion, signal transduction, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Laboratories will involve learning current methods to analyze biological processes in cells. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-349
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Neurophysiology
We will use neurophysiology and neuroanatomy to understand the links between molecules, cells, systems, and ultimately behavior. The course will start with an exploration of neurons and signaling within and among cells. We will then examine some sensory and motor systems. The last portion of the course will examine the whole animal in a neurophysiological context. The classroom portion of the course consists of lectures, discussion of the text and of research articles, problem sets, analysis of case studies, and other activities. The laboratory component will involve a mixture of behavioral, anatomical, and physiological studies on vertebrate and invertebrate animals, electronic modeling of nerve circuits, and computer simulations of nerve activity. The labs are designed to introduce students to some fundamental neurophysiological techniques and to a variety of study organisms, and to strengthen experimental design and analysis skills. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-350
Credit Hours:
4
Genomics
Genomics is the study of genomes, the entire collection of genetic information found in a specific organism. This field of study attempts to understand how all of the genes in a given genome cooperatively function to orchestrate the biological activities within the organism. The genomic DNA sequences of thousands of species have been determined, including humans, providing a wealth of information about the genetic composition and evolutionary relatedness of species. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts in genomics, including how genome sequences are assembled, how potential genes within the genome are identified and characterized, how genomes are organized and regulated, and how genomes evolve. Contemporary papers from the field of genomics will be discussed to complement the concepts addressed in class. The laboratory component of this course will be computer-based, utilizing various online databases and "bioinformatic" programs to carry out a series of projects on genome assembly and compositional analysis as well as "wet-lab" experiments to explore genome regulation. This course satisfies the oral communication requirement. Prerequisites: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-356
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics
BIOL-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
A research problem (library, field, or laboratory) that provides the opportunity for the qualified student to extend his or her interest beyond the limits of particular course offerings. Does not count toward minimal departmental requirements.
BIOL-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
A research problem (library, field, or laboratory) that provides the opportunity for the qualified student to extend his or her interest beyond the limits of particular course offerings. Does not count toward minimal departmental requirements.
BIOL-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
BIOL-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
BIOL-370
Credit Hours:
4
Conservation Biology
Conservation Biology requires the broad use of biological disciplines such as ecology, physiology, genetics, and animal behavior, as well as appreciation of policy issues, to understand and manage biodiversity. In this course, students will learn how to apply these biological tools for the purpose of defining and maintaining biodiversity at many scales. We will also cover human impacts on biodiversity, as well as the link between science and policy in protection efforts. This course will emphasize critical reading of primary literature as well as gaining hands-on experiences with population modeling, and measuring and monitoring local biodiversity. Prerequisites: Biology core or consent.
BIOL-375
Credit Hours:
4
Population and Community Ecology
In this course, we will examine 1) how populations and communities are structured, 2) how populations and communities change over time, and 3) how populations and communities are influenced by their environment or ecological context. An emphasis will be placed on using primary literature and on doing ecology in the field and lab. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent. This course satisfies the Oral Communication requirement.
BIOL-380
Credit Hours:
4
Evolutionary Biology
This course builds on BIOL 202 and completes an in-depth survey of evolutionary theory with emphasis on processes that drive organismal change. We examine how molecular technology has impacted the study of evolutionary processes, and how new methods of analysis are changing the study of population genetics, phylogeny construction, adaptive radiation, etc. Experimental design and reading of primary and secondary scientific literature are stressed. Through the course, emphasis is placed on integration of all biological disciplines under the paradigm of evolution. Prerequisite: Biology core.
BIOL-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Biology
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
BIOL-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
For seniors desiring to work on an advanced research problem. Biology 451 is to be taken if no previous work on the specific research project has been accomplished. Students with prior, substantial experience on their research project (such as a summer research experience with a Denison faculty member) may petition to move directly into Biology 452. Prior consent of the advising faculty is required for registration. The grade is determined by the advisor. Completion of Biology 451 does not fulfill an upper-level biology course requirement for the major.
BIOL-452
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Senior Research
For seniors working on an advanced research problem. Following the completion of a substantial research experience, such as Biology 451 or a summer research experience with a Denison faculty member, students may take Biology 452. Prior consent of the advising faculty is required for registration. The grade is determined by the advisor. Completion of Biology 452 fulfills one upper- level biology course requirement for the major. Students enrolled in BIOL 452 have the option of purusing senior research with Recognition. Interested students should speak with their research advisor or the Chair of Biology to learn more about the Recognition process and expectations.
CHEM-131
Credit Hours:
4
Atoms and Molecules: Structure and Dynamics
This course is an introduction to the study of chemical phenomena using an "atoms-first" approach -- starting with atoms and building up to more complex molecules. Students will explore principles of atomic structure, molecular bonding and structure, electronic properties, intermolecular forces in all phases of matter, chemical equilibrium, and thermodynamics. Core concepts will be taught through active learning, and laboratory investigation will develop skills in foundational quantitative analysis (measurement, stoichiometry, error analysis) and spectroscopy. Cognitive skills in graphical and written presentation of chemistry developed in this course will be built on in subsequent courses. This course satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly.
CHEM-132
Credit Hours:
4
Organic Structure and Reactivity
This course builds on the foundation of molecular structural and electronic properties developed in CHEM 131. Students will be introduced to chemical reactions of inorganic and organic compounds, including acid/base reactions, precipitation reactions and substitution and elimination reactions. In-depth analysis of reaction chemistry will encompass aspects of equilibrium, thermodynamics, and kinetics. The principles of conformation and stereochemistry of organic and inorganic molecules, and organic reaction mechanisms will be emphasized. Skills in presentation of scientific data, and experimental design and analysis will be developed and built on in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: CHEM 131. This course satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly.
CHEM-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Chemistry
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CHEM-212
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Chemistry
A study of the chemistry of the atmosphere, natural water, and soils with a special focus on acid precipitation, greenhouse gases, ozone depletion, urban and indoor air pollution, water and soil pollution, solid and hazardous waste disposal and risk assessment. Prerequisites 121-122 or 131-132. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. This course can be used to satisfy a minor in chemistry. Safety glasses required.
CHEM-251
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Organic Chemistry
This course expands upon concepts in molecular structure and behavior presented in CHEM 131 and CHEM 132 and applies them to the systematic investigation of the reactivity of organic molecules. Students will explore the transformation and reaction chemistry of organic functional groups, including alcohols, aromatics, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and their derivatives. Reactions are explored with an emphasis on the mechanism of reactivity, and in the context of organic synthesis with a focus on the art of retrosynthetic analysis for complex targets. Laboratory experiments are selected to introduce techniques for the synthesis, purification, and analysis of organic compounds discussed in class. Offered in the fall only. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Safety glasses required. Prerequisite: CHEM 132.
CHEM-258
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Biochemistry
A study of the major chemical processes and molecular species that characterize living organisms. Principles of molecular structure and chemical reactivity from CHEM 131, 132, and 251 will be developed in greater quantitative detail and applied to investigation of the molecular interactions that underlie cellular life. Primary emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between the structures of biological macromolecules (particularly proteins) and their functions. Laboratory work will consist of a series of multi-week experiments focused on the isolation and subsequent characterization of active biological macromolecules from living organisms. Offered in the spring only. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: CHEM 251 and BIOL 150, or consent of instructor.
CHEM-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Chemistry
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CHEM-300
Credit Hours:
Chemistry & Biochemistry Assessment I
A pass/fail course used to track all chemistry and biochemistry majors' completion of the required third-year departmental assessment exam. Earning the required S (pass) in this course entails completion of the assessment exam with a passing score as designated by the department.
CHEM-317
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry
This course in inorganic chemistry investigates the structural and bonding models of molecules using concepts of symmetry and molecular orbitals. Investigation of reactions and intermolecular forces is done in the context of inorganic substances. The classroom portion includes introduction to and an oral presentation on the primary literature of the discipline while the laboratory portion includes synthesis of molecules and measurement of their properties. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: CHEM 258, or consent of instructor.
CHEM-331
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Analytical Chemistry
A course of quantitative analytical chemistry, based on principles of chemical equilibrium and thermodynamics. The laboratory includes exposure to a range of gravimetric and volumetric methods along with spectroscopic, chromatograhic, and electrochemical techniques for analysis. Three class periods and one laboratory period weekly. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisite: CHEM 258, or consent of instructor.
CHEM-343
Credit Hours:
0-4
Intermediate Physical Chemistry
An examination of the physical properties of chemical systems from both macroscopic and microscopic points of view. Topics include thermodynamics, structure and bonding from a quantum mechanical point of view, an introduction to spectroscopy, and chemical kinetics. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Offered spring semester only. Prerequisite: CHEM 258, MATH 124 and PHYS 121, or consent of instructor.
CHEM-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Laboratory (or library) research, in consultation with a member of the chemistry faculty. Offered to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites: Consent of faculty mentor. Hours arranged. Safety glasses required.
CHEM-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Laboratory (or library) research, in consultation with a member of the chemistry faculty. Offered to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites: Consent of faculty mentor. Hours arranged. Safety glasses required.
CHEM-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CHEM-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CHEM-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Chemistry
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CHEM-400
Credit Hours:
Chemistry % Biochemestry Assessment II
A pass/fail course used to track all chemistry and biochemistry majors' completion of the required senior interview. Earning the required S (pass) in this course entails completing the senior interview in good faith. Students who are not adequately prepared will be required to retake the interview.
CHEM-421
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Biochemistry: Modern Techniques
An in-depth exploration of modern techniques in biochemistry research. The focus will be on how the structure and function of biological macromolecules are investigated with a historical perspective of seminal studies leading to a detailed discussion of the most modern laboratory techniques ind instrumentation. Topics will vary, but may include DNA and protein crystallography, NMR, genomics, proteomics, radiotracers, microarrays, and other topics from the current scientific literture. Three class periods and one three-hour research/writing laboratory weekly. Prerequiste" CHEM 317 or CHEM 331 or CHEM 343 or consent of instructor.
CHEM-427
Credit Hours:
4
Synthetic Organic Chemistry: Designing Molecules and Materials
This course will explore the art of modern organic synthesis. This includes learning the chemistry behind current organic techniques and reactions, as well as gaining an understanding of design strategies to achieve complex molecules and functional materials. Students will engage with the synthesis strategies of several key pharmaceutical targets and the motivations for their exploration (drugs design). This class will also explore the fundamental principles governing the properties of modern organic materials, from compostable plastics to flat screen TVs. In addition, throughout this course students will engage in the process of proposal writing, from idea development to finished proposal. Three class periods and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: CHEM 317 or CHEM 331 or CHEM 343 or consent of instructor.
CHEM-446
Credit Hours:
4
Chemistry in 2D: Surface Chemistry and its applications
This course will explore the chemistry and physics behind monolayers and the interfacial phenomena that control the behavior of these single molecule thick films. We will connect what we know about 3D or bulk systems (such as the thermodynamics, intermolecular interactions, and phase behavior) to a 2D surface environment. This course thus reviews and builds on the topics presented in physical chemistry. Our discussion of monolayers and surfaces will also include common measurement techniques. The second part of this course will discuss modern applications of and the use of monolayers (and bilayers) as models to study topics in biophysics and materials science. The specific applications covered will vary with student interest. Three class periods and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: CHEM 343 or consent of instructor.
CHEM-449
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Biochemistry: Nucleic acids
An in-depth exploration of modern topics in the field of nucleic acids. A focus will be on macromolecular structure and intermolecular interactions between proteins and nucleic acids, and the effects of these on biological systems and scientific research. Topics will vary, but may include restriction enzymes, RNA silencing, RNA-directed prokaryotic immunity, riboswitches, and other topics from the current scientific literature. Three class periods and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: CHEM 317 or CHEM 331 or CHEM 343 or consent of instructor.
CHEM-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Laboratory research for qualified seniors working under faculty supervision. Students who wish to qualify for graduation with honors must first enroll in these courses. Prerequisite: Staff approval. Hours arranged. Safety glasses required.
CHEM-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Laboratory research for qualified seniors working under faculty supervision. Students who wish to qualify for graduation with honors must first enroll in these courses. Prerequisite: Staff approval. Hours arranged. Safety glasses required.
CS-109
Credit Hours:
4
Foundations of Computer Science
This course is an introduction to computational problem solving. In each instance of the course, students will develop their abilities to abstract and model problems drawn from a particular application domain, and generate elegant and efficient solutions. Students will practice these skills by developing computer programs to solve these applied problems. Possible application domains may include modeling in the social sciences, big data analysis, robotics, artificial intelligence, etc. The course will cover programming fundamentals, as well as the development of algorithms and data manipulation techniques related to the chosen application area. The level of this course is equivalent to CS 110 and 111; therefore students may earn credit for at most one of CS 109, 110, and 111. Absolutely no prior experience is necessary.
CS-110
Credit Hours:
4
Foundations of Computing Through Digital Media
This course is an introduction to computational problem solving. Students will develop their abilities to abstract otherwise complex problems and generate elegant and efficient solutions. Students will practice these skills by developing computer programs that manipulate digital images and sounds. These skills will prove applicable not only in subsequent computer science courses but in numerous other fields. The level of this course is equivalent to CS 109 and 111; therefore students may earn credit for at most one of CS 109, 110, and 111. Absolutely no prior experience is necessary.
CS-111
Credit Hours:
4
Foundations of Computing for Scientific Discovery
This course is an introduction to computational problem solving. Students will develop their abilities to abstract (or model) otherwise complex problems and generate elegant and efficient solutions. Students will practice these skills by developing computer programs that solve problems motivated by research in the sciences. Additional topics may include Monte Carlo methods, data analysis, population dynamics, computational biology, genetic algorithms, cellular automata, networks, data mining, and fractals. The level of this course is equivalent to CS 109 and 110; therefore students may earn credit for at most one of CS 109, 110, and 111. Absolutely no prior experience is necessary.
CS-119
Credit Hours:
1
Seminar: Programming Problems
Students meet weekly to solve a challenging programming problem. Strategies for solving problems will be discussed. Used as a preparation for programming contests. Prerequisite: CS 173. Offered fall semester.
CS-173
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Computer Science
A study of intermediate level computer science principles and programming techniques with an emphasis on abstract data types and software engineering. Topics include recursion, sorting, dynamic memory allocation, basic data structures, software engineering principles, and modularization. Prerequisite: CS 109 or 110 or 111.
CS-174
Credit Hours:
4
Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science
This course covers mathematical topics necessary for understanding concepts in computer sciences. Topics include proofs, sets, relations, functions, number theory, induction, solving recurrences, probability, elementary counting techniques and matrices. Prerequisite: CS 109 or 110 or 111.
CS-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Computer Science
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CS-200
Credit Hours:
1
Topics in Computer Science
Occasionally, the department offers this "mini course" devoted to a particular application or programming language. Past offerings have included scripting languages, Mac OS X programming, LaTeX, Chemoinformatics, and iOS/mobile device programming.
CS-215
Credit Hours:
1
Technical Communication I
This course aims to enhance mathematics and computer science students' proficiency and comfort in orally communicating content in their disciplines. Students will present three talks during the semester on substantive, well-researched themes appropriate to their status in their major. Prerequisite: Math 210 or CS 271.
CS-271
Credit Hours:
4
Data Structures
In this course, students study a variety of data organization methods, and implement and analyze the efficiency of basic algorithms that use these data structures. Course topics include lists, stacks, queues, binary search trees, heaps, priority queues, hash tables, and balanced trees. Students will also be introduced to basic functional programming in LISP. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Intermediate Computer Science (CS 173) and a grade of C or higher in Discrete Math (CS 174) or Proof Techniques (MATH 210). Prerequisites: CS 173 and either CS 174 or MATH 210.
CS-275
Credit Hours:
4
Elementary Graph Theory
Graphs are mathematical structures that are used to model a great variety of phenomena ranging from the internet to social networks to phylogenetic clusters. In this class, we will study the mathematical properties of graphs and develop algorithms to solve many common graph problems. Prerequisite: CS 109, 110 or 111 and 174 or Math 210.
CS-281
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Computer Systems
The Introduction to Computer Systems course provides a perspective into how computer systems execute programs, store information, and communicate. It enables studoents to become better problem solvers, especially in the dealing with issues of performance, portability and robustness. It also serves as a foundation for courses on operating systems, networks, and parallel computing, where a deeper understanding of systems-level issues is required. Topics covered include: basic digital logic design and computer organization, machine-level code and its generation by compilers, performance evaluation and optimatization, representation and computer arithmetic, and memory organization and management.
CS-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Computer Science
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CS-309
Credit Hours:
4
Computational Biology
As large and complex data sets have become more prevalent in biology, computer algorithms for analyzing the data have become critical, driving the need for scientists with expertise in both fields. This interdisciplinary course will explore this intersection, examining the biology and the computational methods behind a variety of interesting and important problems. The laboratory portion of the course will involve students working together in multidisciplinary groups to design algorithms to investigate these problems, as well as undertaking a self-designed "capstone" project at the end of the term. Prerequisites: CS 173 and either CS 271 or MATH 231. Students are also encouraged to have taken BIOL 150 and 201. Course is cross-listed with BIOL 309.
CS-315
Credit Hours:
1
Technical Communication II
This course is a capstone experience in oral and written communication for mathematics and computer science majors. Students will research a substantive topic, write a rigorous expository article, and make a presentation to the department. Prerequisite: Math/CS 215. Corequisite: a 300-400 level mathematics or computer science course.
CS-334
Credit Hours:
4
Theory of Computation
This course is a study of formal languages and their related automata, Turing machines, unsolvable problems and NP-complete problems. The department strongly recommends that student enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisites: CS 271 and 275.
CS-337
Credit Hours:
4
Operations Research
This course involves mathematical modeling of real-world problems and the development of approaches to find optimal (or nearly optimal) solutions to these problems. Topics include: Modeling, Linear Programming and the Simplex Method, the Karush-Kuhn Tucker conditions for optimality, Duality, Network Optimization, and Nonlinear Programming. Prerequisite: Math 231.
CS-339
Credit Hours:
4
Artificial Intelligence
A survey course of topics in Artificial Intelligence including search, formal systems, learning, connectionism, evolutionary computation and computability. A major emphasis is given to the philosophy of Artificial Intelligence. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisite: CS 271 or Math 231 or consent of instructor.
CS-349
Credit Hours:
4
Software Engineering
Students will apply their theoretic background, together with current research ideas to solve real problems. They will study principles of requirements analysis, methods of designing solutions to problems, and testing techniques, with special emphasis on documentation. The department strongly recommends that students enrolling in this course have earned a grade of C or higher in Data Structures (CS 271). Prerequisite: CS 271 and 281.
CS-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study