Data Analytics

DA-101
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Data Analytics
Many of the most pressing problems in the world can be addressed with data. We are awash in data and modern citizenship demands that we become literate in how to interpret data, what assumptions and processes are necessary to analyze data, as well as how we might participate in generating our own analyses and presentations of data. Consequently, data analytics is an emerging field with skills applicable to a wide variety of disciplines. This course introduces analysis, computation, and presentation concerns through the investigation of data driven puzzles in wide array of fields - political, economic, historical, social, biological, and others. No previous experience is required.
DA-301
Credit Hours:
4
Practicum in Data Analytics
Utilizing Denison as a model of society, this practicum set in a seminar will explore questions of collective import through the analysis of new and existing sources of data at Denison. A problem-driven approach will lead to the acquisition of new, appropriate data analytic skills, set in an ethical context that carefully considers the implications of data display and policy recommendations on community members. A significant component of the course is working with policymaking and implementing professionals on campus and developing presentation skills appropriate for professional communication with the public. Though a significant learning opportunity itself, this course should also be seen as a prelude to a community internship in the post-Junior year summer. Prerequisites: CS 111/112, DA 101, and either MATH 242 or a disciplinary research methods course.
DA-350
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Methods for Data Analytics
This course is designed to develop students' understanding of the cutting edge methods and algorithms of data analytics and how they can be used to answer questions about real-world problems. These methods, and the underlying models, can be used to learn from existing data to make predictions about new data. The course will examine both supervised and unsupervised methods and will include topics such as clustering, classification, and network analysis. Prerequisites: CS 181 and DA 301 or permission of instructor.
DA-401
Credit Hours:
4
Seminar in Data Analytics
This is a capstone seminar for the Data Analytics major in which students work collaboratively on research projects. Problems may drive from internship experiences, courses of study at Denison, or other sources subject to instructor approval. Heavy emphasis will be placed on providing ongoing research reports and collective problem solving and review. Prerequisites: DA 301, CS 181, MATH 242, a disciplinary methods course, and a DA internship.

Denison Seminar

DS-200
Credit Hours:
4
Denison Seminar
Denison Seminars are classes that engage 8 - 16 highly motivated sophomore and junior students in interdisciplinary, extradisciplinary, or integrative topic(s) that transcend traditional departmental, programmatic, and/or divisional boundaries. Denison Seminars are liberal arts courses that are directed to a broad and diverse students audience. These classes require no prerequisites and have no other structural limitations. Each Denison Seminar satisfies a divisional GE requirement based on the instructor's home division.
DS-251
Credit Hours:
4
Denison Seminar
Denison Seminars are classes that engage 8 - 16 highly motivated sophomore and junior students in interdisciplinary, extradisciplinary, or integrative topic(s) that transcend traditional departmental, programmatic, and/or divisional boundaries. Denison Seminars are liberal arts courses that are directed to a broad and diverse students audience. These classes require no prerequisites and have no other structural limitations. Each Denison Seminar satisfies a divisional GE requirement based on the instructor's home division. DS 251 also counts toward major/minor requirement in the instructor's home Department.

Global Commerce

GC-101
Credit Hours:
4
Elements of Commerce
This course provides an introductory focus to the elements of global commerce. The course features three main components: an introduction to the language and forms of business, an overview of accounting fundamentals, and discussion of business ethics. Throughout the course, students will gain significant facility in spreadsheet development and manipulation. CORE 101 is required for all Global Commerce majors and is a prerequisite for CORE 401.
GC-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Global Commerce
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
GC-201
Credit Hours:
4
Commerce & Society
This course provides a thematic introduction to global commerce, emphasizing the interrelationship of commerce and society. The particular topic of the course will vary dependent upon the instructors' choice, but students in all sections will explore the relationship of commerce and society from an interdisciplinary perspective, emphasizing the ways in which the economy and trade are connected to culture, social movements, and other global factors. Students in the course will also design their Global Focus and write a research proposal that identifies and describes a problem or critical question related to commerce and society. This course ideally is team-taught. CORE 201 is required for all Global Commerce majors and is a prerequisite for CORE 401. It normally would be taken during the sophomore year.
GC-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Global Commerce
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
GC-301
Credit Hours:
4
Global Financial Markets
The course explores the determination of exchange rates and global interest rates and how they can be affected by national monetary policies. The historical and institutional development of the global financial system will be investigated with an emphasis on the differential effects of international finance on developed and developing countries. CORE 301 is required for all Global Commerce majors and is a prerequisite for CORE 401.
GC-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Global Commerce
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
GC-401
Credit Hours:
4
Global Commerce Senior Seminar
This course serves as the capstone to the Global Commerce major. The senior seminar will provide students with a significant research experience culminating in the GC Senior Experience: either a) the creation of a significant research project or b) the accomplishment of a significant applied experience including a sophisticated reflective component. Both forms of the GC Senior Experience will culminate in a public presentation of that describes and assesses the work. Both forms must also incorporate elements of the Global Focus or transnational perspective developed as a component of the major. Alongside the development of the GC Senior Experience, students will also explore advanced scholarly work on the topic of Global Commerce. CORE 401 is required for all Global Commerce majors.

Interdepartmental

INTD-150
Credit Hours:
1-4
Special Topics
INTD-250
Credit Hours:
1
Homestead Seminar
The Homestead Seminar is a course for Homestead residents and for students who are interested in the Homestead's mission and it methods of sustainable power, agriculture, and community. The seminar has two parts: students must attend and participate in the regularly scheduled sessions and colloquia, and students must propose and complete a project related to the Homestead's mission and operations. Non-Homestead residents must apply to the Homestead seminar teacher to be admitted.
INTD-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Interdepartmental
INTD-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
INTD-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
INTD-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
INTD-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
INTD-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
INTD-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research

Philosophy, Politics, & Econ

PPE-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Research in selected topics in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics.
PPE-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Research in selected topics in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics.

Queer Studies

QS-108
Credit Hours:
4
Bible, Geneder, and Sexuality
This course introduces students to the many conflicted attitudes and images around men, women, and sexuality found in the Bible, from the very different creations of Adam and Eve to Revelation's representation of the Roman Empire as the "whore" of Babylon; from the assertive and sexually suspicious female figures of Ruth and Rahab to Jesus' uncertain masculinity in accounts of his death. We will ask: does the Bible support heterosexuality and decry homosexuality? In addition to close, historically-oriented study of select biblical texts, students will be acquainted with core readings in contemporary gender theory.
QS-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Queer Studies
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
QS-213
Credit Hours:
4
Queer Graphix
Through a series of drawing and printmaking projects, this studio art course seeks to explore and creatively express queer culture, aesthetics and GLBT art history, as well as notions of identity, gender, orientation and sexuality. Art students will employ traditions of journalistic comics, collage, screen-printing, photo-copies, community collaborative artistic work (zines) and research presentation projects to not only celebrate queer artistic practices but also reveal the often damaging impact society and politics has on self identity and expression.
QS-215
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Biology
This is a special topics course originating in the Biology Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in Biology that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering this course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-229
Credit Hours:
4
Mediating Gender and Sexuality
In this class we will examine and evaluate the cultural construction and representation of gender and sexuality in contemporary American mass media, and trace their development throughout the 20th century. We will focus on a variety of mass-produced commercial media texts, surveying television, magazines, advertising, and popular music. Although gender is the primary identity construction examined in the course, we will also pay close attention to other aspects of identity that define American women, such as ethnicity, class, and sexuality. We will investigate representational issues in relation to their political repercussion, and draw from a broad range of academic literature, including feminist television criticism, film theory, cultural studies, communication theory, and popular music criticism. Cross listed with COMM 229.
QS-235
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Black Studies
An introductory study of the Black experience in America, this course will survey the field by examining in series, the various social institutions that comprise Black American life. Students will be introduced to fundamental contemporary issues in the study of Black religion, politics, economics and the family. Additionally, this course will serve as an introduction to Afrocentricity, "the emerging paradigm in Black Studies," and to the new scholarship on Blacks in America.
QS-236
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Communication
This is a special topics course originating in the Communication Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in Communication that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering the course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-238
Credit Hours:
1
Queer Night
This course explores issues in Queer Studies through weekly discussions, often but not exclusively centered around fiction and documentary films selected and screened by faculty and students, as well as readings and other materials to provoke thought and discussion. One of the purposes of this course is to provide students a venue in which to discuss the meanings of sex, gender identity, gender performance, gender roles, and sexual orientation—both in their relationships to each other and their intersections with race, ethnicity, class, religion, culture, and location. Such relationships are central to the themes of the topics course materials selected each semester. The course further seeks to bring a diverse group of faculty and staff together with students to engage in conversation and to learn collaboratively about concepts and themes in Queer Studies. Students may enroll in Queer Night multiple times since the films screened and materials assigned will be different each semester.
QS-240
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Dance
This is a special topics course originating in the Dance Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in Dance that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering the course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-245
Credit Hours:
4
Human Diversity Through Literature
A study of selected works by and about bisexual, gay, lesbian and transgender people.
QS-250
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Literature
This is a special topics course originating in the English Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in English that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering the course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-260
Credit Hours:
4
Human Sexuality
A survey of psychological and biological aspects of sexuality. Topics include prenatal sexual differentiation, sexual anatomy, physiology of sexual response, contraceptive behavior, sexually transmissible infections, sexual dysfunction, and cancer and other diseases of the reproductive system. Prerequisite PSYC 100. Cross-listed with PSYC 260.
QS-268
Credit Hours:
4
Topics in Queer Studies
QS-275
Credit Hours:
4
Philosophy of Feminism
Feminism can radically challenge traditional ways of doing philosophy. In asking why women and women's experience seem to be missing from the tradition of philosophy, it implicitly questions philosophy's claim to objectivity, universality, and truth. Thus, feminist criticism probes some of the most fundamental philosophical assumptions about our knowledge of and interaction with the world and other people. Are there philosophically significant differences between men and women? This course examines this and other questions, emphasizing contemporary feminist discussions of epistemology, ethics, and science. Prerequisite: One previous course in Philosophy or Women's and Gender Studies or consent.
QS-280
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Religion
This is a special topics course originating in the Religion Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in Religion that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering the course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-281
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Theology
Theology is an attempt to understand ourselves and our world in relation to transcendent reality. It is simultaneously an attempt to state persuasively the claims of faith in relation to the controlling experiences of an era. The course will focus upon theological responses to issues like environmental deterioration, race and gender, violence and the death penalty.
QS-290
Credit Hours:
4
Issues in Feminism
An introduction to the field of Women's and Gender Studies, this interdisciplinary course considers the socio-political meanings and practices of gender in our lives. It examines whether gender is biological or socially constructed and how notions of femininity and masculinity are (re)produced. Students will analyze the workings of power and the social production of inequality in institutions such as the family, the workplace, and the state, taking into account the intersections between gender, race, class, ethnicity, nationality, and sexuality. Topics will include sexual and gender violence, equal rights, reproductive technologies, body image, and transnational feminist issues. A central aim of the course is to develop critical reading and thinking about the plurality of women's experiences and about the ways in which women have resisted inequalities and engaged in local/global politics for social transformation and change. This course fulfills the "I" (Interdivisional), "P" (power and justice), and "R" (Oral Communication) Requirements.
QS-300
Credit Hours:
4
Queer Theory
Queer Theory is an interdisciplinary course designed to introduce students to historical and theoretical treatments of topics such as the essentialism vs. constructionism debate; intersections of race/gender/class and sexual orientation; science and representation; performativity and normativity; and ethics, politics and law. Cross-listed with WGST 379.
QS-301
Credit Hours:
4
Seminar: Psychology of Women
This course reviews psychological research and theories on women. Topics include sex bias in psychological research, gender differences and similarities in personality and abilities, lifespan development, problems of adjustment and psychotherapy, language and communication, women's health, female sexuality, and violence against women (rape and wife battering). Prerequisites: PSYC 100, PSYC 200, and junior or senior status, or consent of instructor.
QS-311
Credit Hours:
4
Feminist Theory
This course examines various ways of understanding gender by looking at a variety of feminist theories. Theories studied may include psychoanalytic, feminist theory, cultural materialist feminist theory, etc. Particular consideration will be given to issues raised by multiculturalism, women of color, womanist perspectives, queer theory, class concerns, international and transnational movements. The course will introduce students to a variety of theories to enable them both to recognize and use those theories in their research and social practice. Students will be encouraged to become reflective about their own theoretical stances and to consider how societies can move closer to justice for both women and men. Prerequisite: one Women's and Gender Studies course or consent. (Fall)
QS-313
Credit Hours:
4
Families, Sexuality and the State
In this seminar we explore the ways in which race, ethnicity, social class and sexuality shape family/kinship structures in and beyond the contemporary U.S. We explore specific issues including sexuality and kinship; reproductive technologies and surrogacy; transnational families; and women's political activism in the context of families. These issues are explored using sociological, anthropological, and feminist theories. Prerequisite: ANSO 100 or consent.
QS-323
Credit Hours:
4
Transgender Studies/Transgender Issues
This course offers an introduction to the growing interdisciplinary field of Transgender Studies, focusing on key figures and writings that contributed to its development. Transgender Studies is primarily concerned with directing critical concentration on the diversity and politics of gender, the embodied experience of transgender people, as well as the material conditions and representational strategies that surround, enable, and constrain trans* lives. We will consider relevant selections of scholarship in feminist, queer, and transgender studies; first-person and autobiographical writings by transgender people; and media representations of transgender people and politics that are shaping perspectives of gender within our contemporary cultural moment. Transgender scholarship and perspectives made available by transgender lives provide opportunities to consider and critique the range of apparatuses and systems of regulations that produce the limits and frontiers of embodying sex and gender.
QS-329
Credit Hours:
4
Gender and Communication
This course focuses on (1) the role of interpersonal, social and political communication in the construction of gender expectations in American culture, and (2) how those expectations get communicated/performed, and thus reified, in our daily lives. We will explore the complex interplay between self expectations and social expectations of gender that get expressed, challenged, and ultimately influenced by and within a variety of social and interpersonal contexts: education, the body, organizations, friends and family, romantic relationships, the media, and politics. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290.
QS-330
Credit Hours:
4
Gay and Lesbian Issues in Education
In this seminar students will examine gay and lesbian issues in what is, arguably, the most central social institution in contemporary American culture. We will begin with an introduction to sexuality, drawing upon scientific and historical scholarship, and collectively delineate critical issues regarding sexuality in U.S. schools. We will study Queer Theory as a foundation for the work to follow and read central texts in the queer history of education. We will read major legal documents regarding sexuality in the United States and secondary literature relating to them. In this section our focus will be on students' rights regarding Gay Straight Alliances, safety, and educators' employment rights. We will discuss gay and lesbian issues in a multicultural education framework in terms of issues identified by the class earlier in the semester.
QS-332
Credit Hours:
4
Music and Sexuality
QS-340
Credit Hours:
4
Social Movements
In this course we explore social movements as a primary means of social change. We attempt to understand the conditions which precede, accompany and follow collective action. Particular case studies for analysis will be drawn from the United States and cross-cultural contexts to illustrate that social movements are human products that have both intended and unintended consequences. This course is sometimes taught with a special subtitle: "Social Justice Movements in Communities of Color," cross-listed with the Black Studies Program. Prerequisite: ANSO 100 or consent.
QS-349
Credit Hours:
4
The Trouble with Normal: Normalization, Discourse and Power
One of the primary ways that social power and control are exercised is through the establishment and enforcement of "norms": gender norms, racial norms, sexuality norms, norms of able-bodiedness, norms of beauty and body size, and more. This course delves deeply into the theoretical literature of normalization, especially the work of Michel Foucault, and applies it to a wide range of topics including sexuality, disability, gender roles, body size, and more. The course is cross-listed with Communication. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or QS 101 and QS 201 or QS 300 or consent of instructor.
QS-350
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics Literature
This is a special topics course originating in the English Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in English that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary accordiing to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering the course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-351
Credit Hours:
4
Contemporary Drama
Intensive study of drama from 1956 to the present, with an emphasis on British and American playwrights. The course will focus on the issues, problems, techniques, and generic forms particular to contemporary drama, with interest in the emerging drama of minority, female, and gay and lesbian playwrights. Cross-listed with ENGL 340.
QS-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
QS-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
QS-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
QS-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
QS-383
Credit Hours:
4
Sex and Sexuality in Latin America
This course critically examines gender and sexuality in Latin America. Particularly it will explore the various attempts by the ruling elite to define acceptable and deviant gender roles and sexual identities, how the non-elite resisted the imposition of those elite notions of propriety to create their own codes of conduct, and how those conflicts have changed over time.
QS-400
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Seminar
This is a capstone course for the QS concentration during the spring semester, when it may also serve to help students apply Queer Theory to a senior project or honors project in their chosen major.
QS-402
Credit Hours:
4
Language, Identity and Politics: Discourse and the Public Sphere
This course examines the role of language and discourse in constructing, maintaining and transforming identities, publics and politics in late 20th century democracies. Throughout, we will consider the relationship between language use and unequal relations of power. We will begin with an introduction to discourse studies and explore discourse as symbolic power, social practice and ideology. Next, we will examine the role of discourse in constructing and maintaining identities and communities, including those of subaltern and marginalized publics. Finally, we will examine and critique the role of discourse in public sphere(s) from Afrocentric, feminist and queer perspectives.
QS-406
Credit Hours:
4
Rhetoric and Social Movements
This course focuses on the historical rhetorics of discontent and transformation. Students will examine the characteristics and functions of persuasive discourse produced by social movements; the ways in which symbolic action sought to shape perceptions of concrete realities. Of particular interest will be the intersection of cultural context, biography, and creative rhetorical strategy.
QS-416
Credit Hours:
4
Women in the U.S. Economy
This course will focus on the market and nonmarket contributions of women to the U.S. economy. A historical framework provides the backdrop for examining the economic, political and social institutions that affect women's contributions to the nation's economic well-being. Prerequisite: 301.
QS-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
QS-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research

Writing

W-101
Credit Hours:
4
First-Year Writing Workshop
Required of all students during their first year, the W101 course introduces students to the rigors of college-level writing and provides practice in formulating and presenting a significant argument in a cogent eassay; in finding, evaluating, and incorporating research into their writing; and in assessing their own work and that of their peers. W101 can be used only to satisfy the "S" Writing GE requirement. Open to First Year students only.