ARAB-111
Credit Hours:
4
Beginning Arabic I
This is an introductory course to Arabic language and culture. It assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, the weather, etc. This course follows the underlying philosophy of the integrated approach to Arabic language instruction and explaining culture. It is based on the integration of Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and spoken dialectical Arabic (Levantine) in a way that reflects the actual use of language by its native speakers. This technically leads to the creation of a new mixed variety of MSA and educated spoken Arabic. The new variety, also termed the "middle language" or alternatively "the language of educated Arabs" consists of combined features of both varieties on the phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic levels.
ARAB-112
Credit Hours:
4
Beginning Arabic II
This sequential course builds on its pre-requisite (ARAB-111). It aims at further developing the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Themes covered during the course of the semester include: food and restaurants, shopping, the Mall, studying and education, jobs, doctors and health, transportation, weather, sports & hobbies, touristic places (Jordan, Palestine).
ARAB-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Arabic
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ARAB-211
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Arabic I
This is an intermediate level course in Arabic. Similar to its prerequisite ARAB 112, the course follows the same philosophy of integrating Modern Standard Arabic and spoken Arabic to reflect the language as used by native speakers. The course continues building upon the linguistic foundations started in ARAB 111, and ARAB 112 and aims at developing the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing through two graded levels: for the first half of the semester (the first 8 weeks), you will study topics that are centered around your daily life and activities. The second half of the semester takes you to a more advanced level where you will discuss topics that are moved away from the self and more of a general nature like the history and geography of the Arab world, education, etc. You will also be reading longer passages (250-350 word), writing on the paragraph level, listening to longer texts, and producing longer conversations. In addition, the course continues the practice of introducing Arab society, history, and culture. Overall, the course aims at improving students' linguistic knowledge from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level, according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
ARAB-212
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Arabic II
This course continues building upon the linguistic foundations started in ARAB-211. It aims at developing a higher level of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Arabic through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics. The material covered is theme-based. This increases both quality and quantity of students' vocabulary and they will have more fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas with it. The themes covered include: Arab cities, Arabic language, food & drinks, health, sports, travelling & transportation and weather.
ARAB-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Arabic
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ARAB-300
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Arabic
This course will further develop students' linguistic skills in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Specific topics will vary according to the interests of students and faculty. Prerequisite: Arabic 211 or equivalent.
ARAB-311
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Arabic I
This is an advanced Arabic course that requires the completion of Intermediate Arabic II (ARAB 212) as its prerequisite. While this course continues to build upon the linguistic skills of ARAB 212, Advanced Arabic I (ARAB 311) primarily focuses on developing fluency in oral expression with the hope to reach to a native-like pronunciation (using educated spoken Arabic) and demonstrating accurate use of grammatical structures of Modern Standard Arabic. The material used for this course is chosen in such a way that develops students' linguistic skills across two proficiency levels: For the first 8 weeks of this semester, student will be dealing with topics at the intermediate high level including: law, politics in the Arab World, Palestine, military affairs, environment, and animals in the Arab World. For the second half of the semester, students proficiency level will be develop to handle topics at the mid advanced level, according to the ACTFL criteria. These topics are presented through authentic and unedited Arabic language materials on topics like minorities in the Arab World, Arab Americans, Arabic Language, health and sports.
ARAB-315
Credit Hours:
4
Culture of the Arab World
This course is an introduction to the culture of the Arab world. It aims at giving a comprehensive picture about Arabs and their culture. Students will read books and articles on a wide range of disciplines: history, geography, linguistics, anthropology, economy, women studies, politics and international relations, media, environment and religion. In addition, the course addresses the relationship between the Arab world and the West and issues like stereotyping (on both sides), anti-Americanism, and Islamic fundamentalism.
ARAB-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
ARAB-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
BLST-102
Credit Hours:
4
Black Women's Lives: Autobiography As Protest
The purpose of this course is to explore personal narrative and autobiography as texts of resistance in Black women's lives. The course will use the multiple genres of autobiography such as poetry, essay, short narrative, memoir and major autobiographical works to illustrate Black women's resistance to race, class, and gender subordination or other forms of marginalization and oppression in their lives and in society. These autobiographical texts will be paired with select readings from women's studies and black studies to provide students with the analytical tools to identify how these texts function as forms of personal, social, political or institutional protest. Cross-listed with WGST 102.
BLST-115
Credit Hours:
1
Gospel Piano
BLST-122
Credit Hours:
2
African/Diasporan Dance I
African/Diasporan Dance I focuses on African-centered forms of dance in one of many possible genres across the African Diaspora (e.g., traditional African forms, dances of the African Diaspora, African American vernacular, Hip-Hop, Contemporary African, etc.). Taught from a cultural perspective, this course emphasizes fundamentals such as fluidity, use of the head, spine and pelvis, grounded and weighted qualities, isolations and complex embodied rhythms. Concert attendance, short written critical responses and weekly written journals are examples of outside work that is required. Cross-listed with Dance. No previous dance experience is expected.
BLST-133
Credit Hours:
1
Gospel Choir (Ensemble)
BLST-139
Credit Hours:
1
Gospel Ensemble
BLST-146
Credit Hours:
1-4
Special Topics in Black Studies
BLST-154
Credit Hours:
4
African Art and Visual Culture
This course examines the diverse arts and visual culture of Africa. The scope of this course ranges from pre-colonial to contemporary times, considering a selection of objects, concepts and practices from across the continent. The course is designed to provide you with an introduction to these art forms and the various socio-cultural, historical, critical and aesthetic platforms from which they operate. In addition, we will explore some of the key theoretical issues in the portrayal and interpretation of art and visual culture from this world arena.
BLST-171
Credit Hours:
4
Pre-Colonial Africa
This survey course will introduce students to the history of Africa from the earliest times to 1880 - also known as pre-colonial African history. Though the focus is on Africa south of the Sahara, North Africa will be featured from time to time. Topics include the earliest human settlements in Africa, empires and kingdoms in East, West, and Southern Africa, Islam and Christianity in Africa, slavery, and the partitioning of the continent by powers in the mid 1800s.
BLST-172
Credit Hours:
4
The History of Africa Since 1880
This course examines myths about Africa, the history of colonialism on the continent in the 19th and 20th centuries, the rise of primary resistances to colonialism in the late 1800s and early 1900s, and how this fed the secondary and tertiary resistance movements from the 1930s through to the 1990s when the apartheid regime collapsed in South Africa. Through close readings of the historiography, students will grapple with the history of colonialism and the postcolonial era in Sub Saharan Africa.
BLST-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Black Studies
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
BLST-212
Credit Hours:
4
Race and Ethnicity
Contrary to the expectations of many modern social theorists, race and ethnicity continue to be important elements in the lives of contemporary people, serving as frameworks through which individual identities, community actions, and cultural meanings are interpreted. This course will introduce students to the sociocultural analysis of racial and ethnic identities. How did ethnic and racial identities and communities develop over time? Why does race, though now understood to be a social rather than a biological category, continue to be (mis)understood as a biological category? How do aspects of political, class, gender, and sexual identities influence racial and ethnic identities? We will use a global perspective to understand the conception of race and ethnicity. We will explore these topics among others including cultural and historical variability of ethnic and racial categories, the dialectical formation of identity, and the persistence of certain forms of racial and ethnic prejudice. Students will be expected to examine critically their own common assumptions and presuppositions about race and ethnicity, and to begin developing the theorectical tools for interpreting life in an ethnically diverse world.
BLST-219
Credit Hours:
4
World Music
This course includes in-depth studies of several representative genres of music from around the world, including their social or political contexts. Traditional and popular musics of the world can play important roles in religion, identity formation (gender, race, sexuality), tradition, education, agriculture, history preservation, political resistance and domination, protest, symbolism and entertainment. Students will learn to identify, classify, and describe musical examples from several cultures by discerning musical styles, instrumental or vocal timbre, form and texture.
BLST-222
Credit Hours:
4
Representing Africa on Film
An examination of ethnographic/documentary film dealing with Africa as well as contemporary cinema produced by African filmmakers. This class accords particular attention to the perspectives of African filmmakers as agents in the representation of cultures, social realities and histories in Africa.
BLST-223
Credit Hours:
2
African/Diasporan Dance II
African/Diasporan Dance II focuses on African-centered forms of dance in one of many possible genres across the African Diaspora (e.g., traditional African forms, dances of the African Diaspora, Hip-Hop, African American vernacular, contemporary African, etc.). Taught from a cultural perspective, this course deepens exposure to fundamentals and aesthetics with complex phrasing and multi-layered movement. Emphasis is placed on fluidity, use of the head, spine, and pelvis, grounded and weighted qualities, isolations and complex embodied rhythms. Limited work outside the classroom is required. Examples include concert attendance, focused relative research inquiries, weekly journal writing, and video essays. Cross-listed with Dance 222. Level II is only open to students with previous dance experience in any genre.
BLST-225
Credit Hours:
4
African American History
This course will examine the history of African-Americans in the United States from 1619 to the present with an emphasis on the processes by which African-Americans adjusted to and resisted their conditions. Topics will include African heritage, slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, Jim Crow, wartime experiences, the shift to urban life, the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, the rise of Hip Hop, and contemporary issues. (Fall Semester)
BLST-228
Credit Hours:
4
Rebellion, Resistance and Black Religion
This course examines the cultural continuities between African traditional religions and Black religion in the United States. It also explores the connection between politics and religion among Black Americans and the role religion plays in the African-American quest for liberation. The course examines theological and ethical issues, such as the color of God and the moral justifiability of violent revolution. Students will be given an opportunity to study contemporary religious movements, such as Rastafarianism and the Nation of Islam, along with more traditional African sectarian practices such as voodoo and Santeria.
BLST-234
Credit Hours:
4
History of Gospel Music
This course will explore the historical development of African-American gospel music in the 20th Century. The course will begin an examination of the pre-gospel era (pre-1900s-ca. 1920), move on to gospel music's beginnings (ca. 1920s), and continue unto the present. The course will explore the musical, sociological, political, and religious influences that contributed to the development of the various gospel music eras and styles. Through class lectures, demonstrations, music listening, reading and writing assignments, students will learn about the significant musical and non-musical contributions of African American gospel artists and the historical development of African American gospel music. Students will also strive to gain an understanding of the African American musical aesthetic and to determine how it is retained and expressed with African American gospel music and other musical genres. The class is open to students, staff, and faculty of all levels.
BLST-235
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Black Studies
An introductory study of the Black experience in America, this course will survey the field by examining in series, the various social institutions that comprise Black American life. Students will be introduced to fundamental contemporary issues in the study of Black religion, politics, economics and the family. Additionally, this course will serve as an introduction to Afrocentricity, "the emerging paradigm in Black Studies," and to the new scholarship on Blacks in America.
BLST-237
Credit Hours:
4
Global Health and Local Wellbeing
The course examines the sociocultural bases of both Western and non-Western medical and psychiatric systems. It focuses especially on different cultural assumptions about the nature and causes of illness and the institutional arrangements for the care of patients. The course will consider a variety of social scientific theoretical perspectives on the relationship between illness, medicine, and society. It will assess the degree to which non-Western medical systems may be compatible with and/or of benefit to Western medicine and psychiatry. This course has no prerequisite.
BLST-239
Credit Hours:
4
Racialized Perspectives of Media
This course critically examines the forms that racial and ethnic representations have taken in American media. The course will attempt to chart changes in public perception of racial and ethnic difference in the context of cultural and social transformations, as well as adjustments in the U.S. media industry. We will first establish a foundational knowledge of media criticism and explore theories and perspectives on how ethnicity is experienced in American culture. We will then focus on the topic of the representation of ethnicity in American media, surveying it historically, in relation to specific ethnic groups, at particular moments, and in a variety of genres.
BLST-246
Credit Hours:
2-4
Intermediate Topics in Black Studies
This course provides a venue in which to explore chosen topics in Black Studies at the intermediate level. Topics vary according to the interests of students and faculty. In some cases, the course may be repeated for credit. This course may be cross-listed based on the topic and disciplines that inform it.
BLST-255
Credit Hours:
4
Ethnic Literature
A study of the literature of various ethnic, racial and regional groups of the United States. This course explores cultural heritages, historical struggles, artistic achievements and contemporary relations of groups in American society.
BLST-265
Credit Hours:
4
Black Women and Organizational Leadership
This class explores Black women's leadership orientations in organizations. Afrocentric and womanist frameworks are used to inquire about Black women's leadership in the context of their lives. In this course we explore and theorize Black women's use of communal and generative leadership orientations as well as their application of a multiple and oppositional consciousness. Organizational dilemmas stemming from their race, class, and gender, as well as the unique challenges Black women leaders face in creating a supportive life structure are examined. Students will critique the omission of Black women's leadership styles in the mainstream theories about leadership, as well as explore the implications of Black women's leadership for expanding mainstream theory. Cross-listed with WGST 265.
BLST-320
Credit Hours:
4
Contemporary African Peoples in Historical Perspective
This course is an examination of the historical, ethnic and socio-cultural diversity of sub-Saharan Africa societies. Central to this overview is an emphasis on the pre-colonial, colonial and postcolonial eras. It considers questions of economic development, urbanization, agricultural production and the relationship of the contemporary African state to rural communities. This course also explores symbolic systems in the context of rituals, witchcraft, indigenous churches, and new forms of Christianity currently spreading in Africa. Prerequisite: SA 100 or by consent.
BLST-325
Credit Hours:
4
African-American Women's Literature
Historical and contemporary African-American women's literature grounds an inquiry into black women's literary and intellectual traditions within the matrix of race, gender, class, and sexual relations in the United States.
BLST-327
Credit Hours:
2
African/Diasporan Dance III
African/Diasporan Dance III focuses on African-centered forms of dance in one of many possible genres across the African Diaspora (e.g., traditional African forms, dances of the African Diaspora, African American vernacular, Hip-Hop, contemporary African, etc.). Taught from a cultural perspective, it is designed for students with significant experiences in African/Diasporan dance technique. This course approaches technique holistically and provides students with the rigorous practice required for performance. Emphasis is placed on fluidity, use of the head, spine, and pelvis, grounded and weighted qualities, isolations, and understanding or complex embodied rhythms. Because this course meets approximately 6 hours per week, little outside work is required. Cross-listed with Dance 322. Permission of instructor required.
BLST-333
Credit Hours:
4
The Civil Rights Movement
This seminar will examine the struggle for African-American equality from the 1930s to 1970. The course will begin with the origins of the Civil Rights Movement during the New Deal and World War II. We will then explore the key campaigns, figures, organizations, and guiding themes of the Movement. Special attention will be paid to the processes by which grassroots activism forced responses from the federal, state, and local governments.
BLST-334
Credit Hours:
4
Dancing in the Street: African-American Urban History
This course explores the history of the African-American urban experience. In the mid-18th century, the African-American community began to transition from a rural to an urban population. By the mid-20th century, African-Americans had become an overwhelmingly urban group. The course examines the process of the rural-to-urban transformation of African-Americans and the ways in which they have confronted, resisted, and adjusted to urban conditions of housing, employment, education, culture, and public space.
BLST-337
Credit Hours:
4
The History of Black Power: From Marcus Garvey to Chuck D
This course explores the history of the ideology of Black Power and its various dimensions and incarnations from its origins in the early 20th century to its significance in the present. Topics to be addressed may include, but are not limited to: definitions of Black Power, applications of this ideology to politics and economics, artistic aesthetics, gender dynamics, key figures and organizations, current manifestations, meanings for the African-American community, and reactions from the larger American society.
BLST-339
Credit Hours:
4
Culture, Identity and Politics in Caribbean Society
This course focuses on the social, cultural and political life of the Caribbean area, especially the English- and French-speaking areas. A fragmented group of nations decidedly on the periphery of the global economy, the Caribbean was once one of the richest areas of the world. Its riches then depended on the labor of enslaved Africans; the fruits of the plantation economy were enjoyed mainly by European planters. What is the legacy of such a history? We review the variety of Caribbean policies, from the strong democratic traditions of Jamaica to the autocratic rulers of Haiti, and explore how the Caribbean's unique combination of cultural influences affect the political processes, ways of life, class divisions and ethnic stratification evident in the Caribbean today. Prerequisite: SA 100 or consent.
BLST-340
Credit Hours:
4
Social Movements
In this course we explore social movements as a primary means of social change. We attempt to understand the conditions that precede, accompany and follow collective action. Particular case studies for analysis will be drawn from the United States and cross-cultural contexts to illustrate that social movements are human products that have both intended and unintended consequences. This course is sometimes taught with a special subtitle: "Social Justice Movements in Communities of Color," cross-listed with the Sociology/Anthropology Program. Prerequisite: SA 100 or consent.
BLST-343
Credit Hours:
4
Demography of Africa
In this course, we begin by reviewing current literature to clearly define the term, Demography. Next, we examine the demographic processes of population change in the continent of Africa. Demographic processes include mortality, fertility and migration. In addition, we explore patterns of urbanization, economic development and educational attainment. We analyze survey data from the African Census Analysis Project and Demographic Health Survey. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of demographic processes that allow an examination of interesting demographic, social and anthropological questions. Prerequisite: SA 100.
BLST-345
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Black Studies
BLST-355
Credit Hours:
4
The Harlem Renaissance
An analysis of the interrelationship between the cultural phenomenon and the literature of the Harlem Renaissance, particularly the way in which the social, economic and political conditions of the era helped to shape the literary art of the 1920s.
BLST-356
Credit Hours:
4
The Narrative of Black America
A study of representative samples of Black literature ranging from slave narratives to contemporary Black fiction.
BLST-357
Credit Hours:
4
Postcolonial Literature and Criticism
Readings in literature and criticism from Asia, Africa, Latin American and the Caribbean, in response to the experience of colonialism.
BLST-360
Credit Hours:
4
History of African American Education
The goal of this course is to examine the historical experiences of African Americans in education and related aspects of life. Much of the course will focus on Blacks' experiences in schooling in the South from Reconstruction to the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. In addition, students will contrast African American schooling experiences with those of Native Americans and others during this period. Students who enjoy and benefit from cooperative and participatory learning environments are encouraged to take this course. Prerequisite: EDUC 213 OR BLST 235.
BLST-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
BLST-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
BLST-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
BLST-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
BLST-365
Credit Hours:
4
Studies in 16th- and Early 17th- Century British Literature
A study of selected works of poetry, prose and drama from 1500-1660.
BLST-367
Credit Hours:
4
Black America's Legal Struggle for Educational Equality
This course examines U.S. Supreme Court cases that led to and followed the Brown v Board of Education decisions. It looks at the role of the Black community in challenging both de jure and de facto segregation in schooling and society. We begin by discussing the Plessy decision that Brown overturned and a few other Supreme Court cases that appeared to reduce the meaning of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Ammendments to the US Constitution for Blacks and others. Next, we look at the efforts of individuals such as Charles Hamilton Houston who led the legal offensive of the National Association of the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to overturn Plessy. We will discuss the state of education in relation to Blacks and others prior to Brown and afterward.
BLST-369
Credit Hours:
4
Studies in Early American Literature
Selected topics in the writings of colonial and early national America.
BLST-370
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Black Studies
BLST-384
Credit Hours:
4
Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
This course critically examines the history of the social construction of race and ethnicity in Latin America. In it, we will explore how historians have employed race and ethnicity as methodological categories in order to elucidate the histories of Latin America from the pre-Hispanic era through the modern period. Particularly we will focus on the various attempts by the ruling elite to deploy race in the ordering of society; and, how the non-elite resisted the imposition of those elite conceptions of racial and ethnic hierarchies to create their own codes of conduct, and how those conflicts have changed over time.
BLST-385
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Project
BLST-390
Credit Hours:
4
Topics in Black Studies
BLST-391
Credit Hours:
4
Comparative Slavery in the Americas
For many, the history of slavery is synonymous with the United States South. But slavery was not limited to the US and by approaching slavery from a comparative perspective, we will deepen our understanding of slavery as an institution, slaves as historical actors, and therefore the legacies of slavery throughout the Americas. We will explore regional differences within slaves' opportunities to form families, to create cultures, to rebel, and to labor for their own benefits; as well as the interactions of African cultural visions and Christianity.
BLST-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Topics in Black Studies
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
BLST-422
Credit Hours:
1
Performance: African/Diasporan
New and reconstructed works choreographed by faculty and guest artists in African/Diasporan dance are learned by students and rehearsed for public performance. Participation can include attending biweekly company classes and contributing to the production of the performance. Differences in course number refer to genres of performance work. By audition or invitation only; auditions are typically held during the first two weeks of each semester or immediately preceding a short residency by a guest artist. Cross-listed with Dance 422.
BLST-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
BLST-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
CLAS-101
Credit Hours:
4
Classical Culture
This is an introductory course in the history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome, focusing on particular topics relating to classical culture, and emphasizing the analysis of textual and material evidence.
CLAS-201
Credit Hours:
4
Ancient Greece
An overview of Ancient Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to the period following the death of Alexander the Great. Greek culture was a Mediterranean phenomenon that spread in antiquity from the Aegean through Egypt and central Asia to India and became the core of education for European and American students during the 18th and 19th centuries. The course focuses on the major social and political institutions (such as the creation of the first democracy) as well as the intellectual and artistic achievements of the Greeks.
CLAS-202
Credit Hours:
4
Ancient Rome
A survey of Roman civilization from both an historical and cultural perspective. Chronologically, the course traces the development of the "eternal city" from a tiny village of mud and straw along the banks of the Tiber River in central Italy to the city of marble and bronze dominating the Mediterranean world and beyond. Culturally, we consider Rome's legacy to the western world in terms of its social and political institutions, as well as its intellectual and artistic achievements.
CLAS-211
Credit Hours:
4
Ancient Greek Literature and Society
This course is an introduction to Ancient Greek literature from the Homeric world to the Hellenistic era. Students will read the works of major authors representing a variety of genres from epic poetry to philosophical dialogues, considered in the contexts of both ancient culture and contemporary society.
CLAS-212
Credit Hours:
4
Latin Literature and Society
In this course students will study the literature of ancient Rome, analyzing texts not only for their importance to the development of Latin literature but also for their subsequent influence on later authors, from the Renaissance to the modern world. Readings will include selections from the genres of comic drama, lyric, elegy, epic and satire.
CLAS-221
Credit Hours:
4
Classical Mythology
This course is a study of the mythology of classical antiquity, with an emphasis on its representations in literature and art, and its relationship to the practice and rituals of Greek and Roman religion.
CLAS-301
Credit Hours:
4
Creation Narratives and Power Relations
This is a seminar course on a particular historical, social or cultural topic related to classical antiquity.
CLAS-311
Credit Hours:
4
Gender and Sexuality in Antiquity
This course explores how power and status worked in the family, in politics, in labor practices, and in religious institutions during classical antiquity, focusing on the intersections of gender, class, ethnicity, and sexuality.
CLAS-312
Credit Hours:
4
Ancient Identities
This course considers the various ways the Greeks and Romans speculated about and defined human differences, as well as exploring the ways in which the ancients theorized about and manipulated their environments to achieve a desired identity. Attention is also given to how these theories were received from medieval to modern times.
CLAS-321
Credit Hours:
4
The Classical Tradition
This course focuses on the canon of ancient classical literature, both Greek and Roman, examining the tradition and reception of literary genres within classical antiquity, and considering what influences classical literature may have had on the development of later western thought and literature.
CLAS-322
Credit Hours:
4
Classical Drama
This course focuses on the dramatic arts as practiced in Ancient Greece and Rome. Students will read selected plays, tragic or comic, by the major playwrights of classical antiquity, giving attention to dramaturgy, societal contexts, and influences on the development of western theater.
CLAS-331
Credit Hours:
4
Alexander the Great
This course focuses on the study of the historical record of the life and times of Alexander the Great, examining primary and secondary sources, and placing the career and accomplishments of Alexander in the contemporary social and cultural context of Macedonia, Greece, and the Near East, as well as Alexander's influence on the Hellenistic era of classical antiquity.
CLAS-332
Credit Hours:
4
Imperial Rome
This course focuses on the decline and fall of the Roman Republic and the establishment of the Roman Principate. Students will examine the political, social, and cultural contexts for the creation of an empire that dominated the Mediterranean world, encompassing an area stretching from Britain to Egypt.
CLAS-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
CLAS-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
CLAS-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CLAS-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CLAS-440
Credit Hours:
1
Senior Classics Symposium
This is a required course for senior majors in Classics, ancient Greek or Latin. It is a seminar providing an overview of Greek and Roman culture in preparation for the Senior Comprehensive examinations.
CLAS-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
CLAS-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
EAST-105
Credit Hours:
4
Buddhism
A historical and thematic survey of the Buddhist tradition from the time of Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, until the present. Emphasis upon the way in which Buddhist teachings and practices have interacted with and been changed by various cultures in Asia, and more recently in North America.
EAST-131
Credit Hours:
4
Asian Art and Visual Culture
An introduction to the art and visual culture of India, China, Japan and Southeast Asia focusing on historical, religious and social issues and the function of both art and visual culture.
EAST-141
Credit Hours:
4
Traditional East Asian Civilization
The civilization of China, Japan and Korea from classical times to 1600 C.E. Themes include: the earliest Chinese schools of social and political thought; the genius of political and economic organization which contributed to the unusual longevity of Chinese dynastic institutions; the Japanese adaptation of Confucian and Buddhist practices in different eras; the unique development of Japan's unified feudalism; the Korean development of Neo-Confucianism.
EAST-142
Credit Hours:
4
Modern East Asian Civilization
Beginning from an insider's view of how both prince and peasant saw the world around them before the encroachment of the West, this course analyzes the modern transformation of East Asia. Topics include: the conflict of Sinocentrism with modern nationalism in the Chinese revolution, the Japanese road to Pearl Harbor, and the colonization of Vietnam and Korea.
EAST-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Elementary Topics in East Asian Studies
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
EAST-200
Credit Hours:
4
International Problems
EAST-206
Credit Hours:
4
Dream and Fantasy in East Asian Literature
Through close analysis of some of the most important recurrent themes, this course will examine how the Chinese and Japanese literary traditions reinvent and revitalize themselves in their development. Students will also study the distinctive features of the major genres in the two traditions.
EAST-216
Credit Hours:
4
Religions of China
This course explores the basic teachings and historical development of the most influential religious traditions and schools of thought in East Asia, including Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Shinto. Attention is given to classical texts, popular practice and the recent impact of Western culture on East Asian religion.
EAST-221
Credit Hours:
4
Contemporary Japan: In Search of the "Real" Japan
Japan often conjures images steeped in tradition such as samurai warriors, sumo wrestlers, and geisha clad in kimono. At the same time, however, contemporary Japan is just as easily associated with businessmen, anime, automobiles, and high technology. How have "tradition" and "change" fueled competing visions of Japan what it means to be "Japanese"? How does one go about reconciling these conflicting views? How have these debates evolved over time? How have variously situated individuals and groups in society negotiated shifting circumstances? These questions will be at the heart of this seminar as we consider case studies from different segments of Japanese society. A range of material will be treated as "texts" for analysis and discussion including anime, manga, literary works, and films as well as ethnographic scholarship on Japanese society.
EAST-231
Credit Hours:
4
Art of Japan
An introduction to Japanese architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts from prehistoric times to the 20th century, with an emphasis on the works in their cultural and religious context.
EAST-235
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Modern Chinese and Japanese Literature
This course is designed to provide an introduction to modern Chinese and Japanese fiction for the student who has little or no background in the language, history, or culture of these countries. No prerequisite. This course cross-listed with JAPN 235.
EAST-239
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Japanese Genre Fiction
Genre fiction (sometimes called "commercial fiction") around the world has been broadly categorized as less-refined, or less literary. Postmodern thinkers have demonstrated, however, that popular fiction can serve as a fascinating lens through which to read place (society, race, gender, etc.) and time (historical period). This class will serve as an introduction to Japan's long, rich tradition of genre fiction. In addition to reading recent criticism of the genres discussed, we will consider representative works, primarily by twentieth-century authors, in three genres: historical/period fiction, mystery/detective fiction, and horror fiction. This course is taught in English. No Japanese language required. This course is cross-listed with JAPN 239.
EAST-240
Credit Hours:
4
Chinese Economy
EAST-241
Credit Hours:
4
The Mandate of Heaven in Classical China
Classical China left two legacies of lasting importance: a political system that maintained the same tradition for the next two thousand years, and the Confucian ethical system that spread to Korea, Japan, and Vietnam. The course begins with the origins of Chinese history and moves through the first Empire from 220 B.C.E. to 220 C.E.
EAST-263
Credit Hours:
4
World Views: Spatial Imagination in East Asia
This course explores visual modes employed in the expression of time and space in the construction of narratives in Asian Art. A variety of pictorial formats including: Wall Painting, Hand-Scrolls, Film, and anime; from southeast Asia, China, and Japan will be examined as case studies to explore and analyze narrative structure.
EAST-264
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics