ARTH-101
Credit Hours:
4
The Western World: Ancient to Baroque
This course is an introduction to selected themes, periods, and sites of visual production and built practice in Europe, the Mediterranean, and the New World. It focuses on a selected series of 'case studies' that integrate sites/monuments significant to the flow of Western art with period-specific and general critical issues. The relation of systems of visual and architectural representation to period-specific and current understandings of power, ritual, and the human body, as suggested through the disciplines of Art History and Visual Culture, will be key.
ARTH-111
Credit Hours:
4
Modern Art and Visual Culture
An introduction to the Art and Visual Culture of the Modern Age. This course examines the wide range of visual production of the Modern Age primarily in Europe and North America. It examines the concepts of the Modern, Modernity and Modernism. The class is taught through the lenses and using the methodologies of both Art History and Visual Culture, operating on the assumption that the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries are the age of visual culture. Thus, the class discusses both elite art and the rising popular culture.
ARTH-121
Credit Hours:
4
African Art and Visual Culture
This course examines the diverse arts and visual culture of Africa. The scope of this course ranges from pre-colonial to contemporary times, considering a selection of objects, concepts and practices from across the continent. The course is designed to provide you with an introduction to these art forms and the various socio-cultural, historical, critical and aesthetic platforms from which they operate. In addition, we will explore some of the key theoretical issues in the portrayal and interpretation of art and visual culture from this world arena.
ARTH-131
Credit Hours:
4
Asian Art and Visual Culture
An introduction to the art and visual culture of India, China, Japan and Southeast Asia focusing on historical, religious and social issues and the function of both art and visual culture.
ARTH-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Art
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ARTH-201
Credit Hours:
4
Classical Art and Architecture
This course is an introduction to the art and architecture of Greece and Rome. Visual and spatial practices of religion and politics will be examined, focusing on Classical Athens and on Rome during the Late Republic and Early Empire. Selected works of art and architecture, and specific urban and exurban sites will be considered. Issues surrounding 'classical' forms and their subsequent role in Western art and architecture will be investigated.
ARTH-203
Credit Hours:
4
Early Renaissance Art and Architecture
This course is an introduction to the art, architecture, and selected patterns of urban development in Italy during the Early Renaissance and the Quattrocento. Focus will be on developments in Siena, Rome, and especially Florence. Issues surrounding 'classicism' and the development of new representational systems, new scales and materials in sculpture, new spatial and structural forms in architecture, and new relations to urbanism and centers of power and global expansion will be explored.
ARTH-204
Credit Hours:
4
High Renaissance and Baroque Art & Architecture
This course provides an introduction to the art, architecture, and selected patterns of urban development Rome during the High Renaissance, Mannerism, and the Baroque era through the papacy of Alexander VII (1655-67). Developments from ca. 1450 on in Rome leading to Julius II and the Roman High Renaissance will be a prime focus. Consideration of Mannerism, the Council of Trent and early Baroque visual and architectural forms (later 16th century) will lead to the second focus on 17th century visual and spatial practices in Counter-Reformation Rome and beyond.
ARTH-210
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Ancient to Baroque Art History
ARTH-211
Credit Hours:
4
History of Photography
An introduction to the history of photography from its inception in 1839 to the present day. The class focuses specifically on the multivalent functions of photography in society globally, the theoretical and conceptual bases of its production, consumption and on the critical analysis of photography as a field of art production.
ARTH-212
Credit Hours:
4
American Art
An introduction to American Art and Visual Culture of the American colonies and the United States from the Early-Colonial Period to the beginning of World War II. The class focuses specifically on how Art, Popular Culture and Mass Culture function in the visual culture of the United States until 1939.
ARTH-220
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Modern Art History
ARTH-222
Credit Hours:
4
Representing Africa on Film
An examination of ethnographic/documentary film dealing with Africa as well as contemporary cinema produced by African filmmakers. This class accords particular attention to the perspectives of African filmmakers as agents in the representation of cultures, social realities and histories in Africa.
ARTH-223
Credit Hours:
4
Arts of Oceania
An examination of the diverse arts and cultures of the South Pacific. This course focuses on objects, concepts and practices from Polynesia, Melanesia, Micronesia and Australia as well as the portrayal and interpretation of arts from this geographical region in other areas of the world.
ARTH-225
Credit Hours:
4
Arts of Post-Colonial Africa
This course examines selected issues and debates related to the production, interpretation and collection of visual arts in post-colonial Africa. By way of a series of case studies, we will consider both the individual voices of artists and perspectives from art world information brokers.
ARTH-230
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in African Art History
ARTH-231
Credit Hours:
4
Art of Japan
An introduction to Japanese architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts from prehistoric times to the 20th century, with an emphasis on the works in their cultural and religious context.
ARTH-232
Credit Hours:
4
Art of China
This course is an introduction to Chinese visual culture from prehistoric times through the Mao era. Organized around a selection of key objects and images, this course explores a variety of art forms from China through diverse contexts such as ritual, gender, imperial patronage, literati ideals, and political icons.
ARTH-240
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Asian Art History
ARTH-262
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Art History and Museum Studies
ARTH-281
Credit Hours:
4
19th Century Art History and Visual Culture
This class explores the nature, character, implications and power of the avant -garde and academic art theory and practice in art societies. It analyzes the many layers of political, cultural and social meanings of art in the nineteenth century, as well as its artistic meanings, purposes, effects and agendas. Some topics to be examined include the neoclassical, the romantic, the ideal, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism.
ARTH-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Art
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ARTH-302
Credit Hours:
4
Medieval Art and Architecture
This course is an advanced investigation of art and architectural developments in the Latin West and Byzantine East during the medieval period. Selective foci include western monastic art, building, and lay patronage in Spain, France, and Burgundy during the Romanesque and early Gothic periods, as well as eastern monasticism in Constantinople, Greece, and Asia Minor in the Middle Byzantine period. Issues unique to each cultural sphere will be considered, such as feudalism in the West, and the icon and the role of the Imperial family and Constantinopolitan aristocracy in the East.
ARTH-313
Credit Hours:
4
New Art (Late 20th/21st Century)
This advanced-level class examines Art and Visual Culture since 1980, mostly in the western world, but increasingly globally after 2000. The class explores the intellectually complex, multivalent and frequently socially and politically engaged art of today, focusing on its conceptual platforms, agendas, meanings, purposes, and effects. The course examines an increasingly pluralistic and global art world through the lenses of both Art History and Visual Culture, and it explores the museum as a contested site.
ARTH-324
Credit Hours:
4
Visual Life in African Cities
An advanced level course. Cities in Africa, like their counterparts elsewhere in the world, are intensely -- perhaps even unrelentingly - artistic environments. In Dakar as in Nairobi, in Johannesburg as in Lagos, the urban terrain's unparalleled resources enable myriad artistic phenomena including paintings and sculptures, modernist architecture and public monuments, sartorial expression, as well as print and electronic media such as cartoons, advertisements, video, television, the internet, and popular music. In this seminar style course, students will investigate the artistic propositions and creative resources constituting the urban environment in Africa by way of a series of case studies.
ARTH-333
Credit Hours:
4
Art and Revolution in 20th Century China
This advanced-level course examines the complicated relationship between art and politics in China through key debates and developments in Chinese visual culture during the 20th century. The class explores competing narratives that negotiate the tensions between "tradition and modernity," "East and West," "local and global" and their implications for revolutions in art. Particular attention will be paid to interrogating the ideological underpinnings of artistic mediums and formats, the historiographical stakes of modernity, and the assertion of cultural memory in art and text.
ARTH-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
For the student of marked creative ability who wishes to pursue advanced subjects not otherwise listed, such as design, drawing, graphics, ceramics or history and criticism.
ARTH-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
For the student of marked creative ability who wishes to pursue advanced subjects not otherwise listed, such as design, drawing, graphics, ceramics or history and criticism.
ARTH-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ARTH-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ARTH-380
Credit Hours:
4
Methods of Art History and Visual Culture
This class is required for Art History majors. This class is the first of the three-part capstone experience for the Art History major. It introduces students to the theoretical and methodological platforms of Art History and Visual Culture and examines the historical development of the fields of both Art History and Visual Culture. It introduces students to the methods and theoretical approaches of practicing scholars in the field and asks students to formulate their own platforms, which they will translate into active research in the second and third capstone courses (ARTH 408 and 409).
ARTH-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Art
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ARTH-408
Credit Hours:
4
Art History Senior Seminar: Research
In this required course, senior majors will research and prepare the senior thesis.
ARTH-409
Credit Hours:
1
Art History Senior Seminar: Writing
In this required course, senior majors will present their senior thesis during our annual senior symposium.
ARTH-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
ARTH-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
ARTS-101
Credit Hours:
4
Studio Art Foundation
Directed at both non-art majors and minors, Studio Art Foundation (SAF) is a basic introduction to artistic practice in contemporary culture. Through an interdisciplinary approach and a technical understanding of multiple mediums, the course crosses borders between two-dimensional, three-dimensional and time based artistic disciplines. Campus wide events (lectures, concerts, exhibitions) are used as points of departure in the class to emphasize the critical nature of art making with other content areas of study, theory and research.
ARTS-110
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Drawing
A studio course in the fundamentals of drawing in several media. Problems in still life, rendering, and perspective will be covered, along with historical and contemporary approaches to drawing.
ARTS-115
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Painting
Historical and contemporary approaches to painting technique will be covered in readings and discussions and by working with painting materials.
ARTS-117
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Photography
The photographic philosophy and digital process will be approached from historical and contemporary viewpoints with problems in light, form, texture and composition.
ARTS-121
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Ceramics
A broad introduction to all ceramics potential. Clay working in sculptural as well as vessel-oriented directions. Slide presentations and discussions with references made to ceramic history as well as to contemporary ceramic art. Students are introduced to a variety of hand building techniques and are encouraged to pursue their individual creative potential.
ARTS-122
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Ceramics - The Wheel
An introduction to producing Ceramic forms, both utilitarian and sculptural, using the potter's wheel. Image presentations and discussions will introduce students to the contemporary and historical role of ceramics in art and material culture. Students are introduced to a variety of throwing techniques and surface treatments and are encouraged to pursue their individual creative potential.
ARTS-131
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Printmaking
As a foundation course, emphasis will be on historical and contemporary concepts in art through the media of printmaking. The course will provide exposure to printmaking processes with direct involvement in one of the following: intaglio, screen printing and relief. Tools, materials and techniques will be fully covered regarding the featured printmaking process. Art issues such as format and content of visual images will be stressed as well as technical procedures for implementing the print.
ARTS-141
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Sculpture
This course is an introductory course into sculpture. It will concentrate on developing sculptural thinking and working habits, the safe use of basic tools, understanding ways of seeing and the translation of experience into an arts practice.
ARTS-165
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Studio Art
Special topic courses with a focus on particular aspects of studio art at the introductory level.
ARTS-170
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Drawing for Majors
A studio course in the fundamentals of drawing in several media. Problems in still life, rendering, and perspective will be covered, along with historical and contemporary approaches to drawing.
ARTS-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Art
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ARTS-210
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Drawing
Continued experience in drawing with emphasis on contemporary techniques. Prime objective is increased capacity for responsive seeing and a deeper understanding of drawing as a total medium. Prerequisite: ARTS 110 or consent.
ARTS-211
Credit Hours:
4
Life Drawing
Study from the human figure in charcoal and other media with emphasis on structure in line, value and color. Prerequisite: ARTS 110 or consent.
ARTS-212
Credit Hours:
4
Life Drawing
Study from the human figure in charcoal and other media with emphasis on structure in line, value and color. Prerequisite: ARTS 110 or consent.
ARTS-213
Credit Hours:
4
Queer Graphix
Through a series of drawing and printmaking projects, this studio art course seeks to explore and creatively express queer culture, aesthetics and GLBT art history, as well as notions of identity, gender, orientation and sexuality. Art students will employ traditions of journalistic comics, collage, screen-printing, photo-copies, community collaborative artistic work (zines) and research presentation projects to not only celebrate queer artistic practices but also reveal the often damaging impact society and politics has on self-identity and expression.
ARTS-215
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Painting
Continued painting experience with emphasis on developing individual concepts. Prerequisite: ARTS 115 or consent.
ARTS-217
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Photography
A continuation of ARTS 117. Attention will be placed on generating, evolving and completing a cohesive body of digital photographic work. Prerequisite: ARTS 117 or consent.
ARTS-220
Credit Hours:
4
Ceramic History and Contemporary Practice
The history of ceramics very closely parallels the development of civilization and culture across the planet. In this studio course, students will draw upon this long, rich history as inspiration for their own work and gain a deeper understanding of the context in which they and other contemporary artists are creating ceramic art. The primary emphasis of ceramic history and its impact on contemporary practice will be explored through image presentations, research, discussions and studio work. Students will use a variety of construction techniques and surface treatments to transform their ideas and research into objects and are encouraged to pursue their individual creative potential. No prerequisites.
ARTS-221
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Ceramics
Students will hone the skills gained in previous ceramic courses and will focus on refining the application of learned techniques to produce visually and conceptually compelling work. Image presentations and discussions will lead to a deeper understanding of contemporary and historical ceramic art. Students will gain experience in different firing technologies and clay and glaze chemistry. Primary emphasis is on students' individual conceptual and technical development. Prerequisite: ARTS 121, ARTS 122 or Ceramic Multiples.
ARTS-223
Credit Hours:
4
The Ceramic Surface
In this studio course students will explore the numerous options for surface expression in ceramic art making. One of clay's unique properties is the ability to faithfully record impressions in its surface - from the fingerprint of a potter to patterned designs stamped into the surface. Today, mark making on clay has caught up with technology, incorporating digital processes into the roster of print technique possibilities. Students will learn to make their own glazes, effectively use slips, glazes, china paints, lustres, print-transfers, photo-decals and alternative firing techniques. Students will explore the relationships between content, form and surface through the creative process, group critiques, readings, image presentations and discussions. Prerequisite: A Denison University ceramic course or consent of instructor.
ARTS-224
Credit Hours:
4
Ceramic Multiples (Ceramics From Molds)
In this studio course students learn to create ceramic objects using plaster molds, how to make casting slip, and the basics of kiln firing. We will explore the relationship between Art, Design, and Craft, and students will be encouraged to push the boundaries of where these categories begin and end. Producing ceramic objects from molds allows for greater refinement of the object, unlimited possibilities of form and the potential of creating multiple replicas or variations on one form. Because of inherent associations with industry, technology, and mass-production, objects produced from molds offer unique conceptual possibilities that students will pursue through the creative process, group critiques, readings and discussions. Prerequisite: Any Denison University Studio Art course or consent of the instructor.
ARTS-231
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Printmaking
Students may work with any printmaking processes in which they have had experience or with the consent of instructor. Processes available to Printmaking II students include: relief, lithography, intaglio or screen printing. Emphasis will be on continued technical and conceptual development. Prerequisite: ARTS 131 or consent.
ARTS-240
Credit Hours:
4
Installation/Site-Specific Art
In installation art the space is considered like the blank sheet of paper of a drawing. Its goal is the transformation of spaces through the use of objects, images, color, etc. Site-specific art is art that is created in a certain space, where the place is part of the work and adds meaning to it. This Installation/Site-Specific Art studio class will focus on creating objects that will transform a variety of architectural spaces, in which the course and its participants will examine from multiple perspectives ranging from formal concerns to historical research and metaphorical opportunities.
ARTS-241
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Sculpture
This course focuses on the search for art practices. The students have to develop projects starting out with specific themes that are discussed by the group, but the end product is personal depending on the individual conceptual and aesthetic development.
ARTS-243
Credit Hours:
4
Mixed Media Sculpture
Combining theory and practice in the sculpture studio, this topical intermediate sculpture course focuses its central objective around an overarching relevant interdisciplinary theme that varies per semester. Along with theoretical readings and presentations, a series of sculpture projects will be developed by each student to explore the selected research theme created with a range of techniques and materials. Course materials may include plaster, wax, fabric, found objects, wood, and metal. The works will acquire meaning based not only on the form, but also on the material the work is made out of and its connotations. Importance will be given to the investigation on the theme, to the process of sculptural creation and to the end products, the final sculpture.
ARTS-244
Credit Hours:
4
Fiber Arts
This studio art course is an introduction to the basic expressive potential of weaving and macrame to create two- and three-dimensional works. The use of natural and/or artificial materials will be introduced and a combination between structural and non-structural materials, to make the composition work as an image, object or installation. The artworks created will be the result of an analytic process guided by information acquired, the interpretation of that information and experiences lived by each participant of this class.
ARTS-245
Credit Hours:
4
New Media: Internet Art
This course will focus on the artistic generation of meaning through the technology of new media. Within the art curriculum the challenge will be to work with this technically advanced medium for the purpose of personal expression. Instruction will be in the form of lectures, tutorials and demos and there will be a lab for introducing theory and works of electronic art/music for discussion and inspiration. Questions concerning our relation to and with digital media and the nature of the electronic arts and their potential to be interactive will be probed throughout the semester.
ARTS-264
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Studio Art
ARTS-265
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Studio Art
ARTS-267
Credit Hours:
4
Performance Art
This studio art course will focus on processes of creating and executing actions that may have an artistic content. In this course the participants will generate actions that will be performed. Prior to the execution of artistic actions the participants will be exposed to a wide range of artistic performances from different backgrounds, ritualistic actions in different cultures from ancient to contemporary. We will be working on the approach to art practices from the production of meaning and the relationship between art and life. The main objective is to use actions as a way of discovering arts practices. This course fulfills the Oral Communication general education requirement and a Fine Arts Division requirement.
ARTS-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Art
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ARTS-308
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Animation
Animation is the illusion of motion created by the consecutive display of slightly varying drawings or models of static elements. In this course, students we learn the fundamentals of traditional animation techniques, as well as cover many aspects of the more experimental contemporary forms of stop-motion animation processes. Students will be given several animation "studies" over the course of the semester that will offer them experience with different types of stop-motion and computer key-framed techniques, as well as experience in story-boarding, sound recording, character movement and rig development, and post digital effects work. In addition to workshop projects, students will be exposed to outside readings and film viewings.
ARTS-310
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Drawing
Continued drawing experience with emphasis on developing individual skills, concepts and expression. Prerequisite: ARTS 210 or consent of instructor.
ARTS-315
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Painting
Continued painting experience. Prerequisite: ARTS 115 or consent of instructor.
ARTS-317
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Photography
Students also are directed into a critical analysis of photography from a theoretical, technical and historical perspective and are introduced to the medium format camera. Prerequisite: ARTS 117 or consent of instructor.
ARTS-321
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Ceramics
This course requires a working knowledge of the ceramic process. Students work in depth, developing a personal approach to the medium, acquiring greater competency in terms of concept and technique. Prerequisite: ARTS 121, 221 or consent of instructor.
ARTS-331
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Printmaking
Students may work with any printmaking process in which they have had experience or with the consent of instructor. Processes available to Printmaking III students include: relief, lithography, intaglio or screen printing. Experimentation and innovation, both conceptually and technically, will be stressed for the advanced student. Prerequisite: ARTS 231-232.
ARTS-341
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Sculpture
Prerequisite: ARTS 241-242.
ARTS-345
Credit Hours:
4
Junior Arts Practicum
Through independent project work, readings, oral presentations, and individual/group discussions, this course will focus on the universal studio practice of critiques to further develop student skills to describe, analyze, interpret and understand their own artwork and its goals as well as the work of others. Students will also pursue research throughout the semester to make important connections between their creative practice and the art historical/theoretical context in which they work. This course is required for all studio art majors.
ARTS-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
For the student of marked creative ability who wishes to pursue advanced subjects not otherwise listed, such as design, graphics, or history and criticism.
ARTS-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
For the student of marked creative ability who wishes to pursue advanced subjects not otherwise listed, such as design, graphics, or history and criticism.
ARTS-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ARTS-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ARTS-365
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Special Topics
ARTS-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Art
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ARTS-400
Credit Hours:
3
Senior Art History Project
Studio, B.A., B.F.A.
ARTS-401
Credit Hours:
4
Visual Arts Practicum
Theory and creative practice in selected areas of the visual arts. Majors are required to enroll in the Visual Arts Practicum twice in their senior year in conjunction with a 300-level course in their area of specialization. This class is for Studio Art majors only or by permission of instructor.
ARTS-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
ARTS-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
CINE-104
Credit Hours:
4
Film Aesthetics and Analysis
An introduction to the study of cinema as an art form. The focus is on the analysis of narrative (as well as some non-narrative forms of cinema) and film style (the elements of film technique such as editing, cinematography, lighting and color, staging, and sound). Students learn to identify these elements of cinema aesthetics and analyze the ways in which they work in a variety of different types of film, including Hollywood films, art cinema, documentary, and avant-garde/experimental film. Required weekly film screenings. Required for all Cinema majors and minors: majors and minors should complete CINE 104 by the end of their first year.
CINE-150
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Cinema
Selected topics in Cinema.
CINE-219
Credit Hours:
4
Elementary Cinema Production
An introductory digital production course exploring the nature of the cinematic medium from the point of view of production and technique, with an emphasis upon cinema as an aesthetic form. Each student will complete a series of projects in the digital format. Students are required to share in the expenses of their digital productions. Required of Cinema majors. No prerequisites.
CINE-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Cinema
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CINE-308
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Animation
Animation is the illusion of motion created by the consecutive display of slightly varying drawings or models of static elements. In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of traditional animation techniques, as well as cover many aspects of the more experimental contemporary forms of stop-motion animation processes. Students will be given several animation "studies" over the course of the semester that will offer them experience with different types of stop-motion and computer key-framed techniques, as well as experience in story-boarding, sound recording, character movement and rig development, and post digital effects work. In addition to workshop projects, students will be exposed to outside readings and film viewings.
CINE-310
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Cinema Production
An introductory course in 16mm film examining this chemical-based medium in both theory and practice. Each student will complete a series of short film projects with an emphasis on film grammar, film aesthetics, and all facets of film production. Students are required to share in the expenses of their film productions. Required of Cinema majors. Prerequisite: CINE 219.
CINE-312
Credit Hours:
4
Cinema Seminar
The subject for these seminars varies from year to year, and offers the advanced student of cinema intensive and humanistic investigation of specialized generic, stylistic, and creative problems in the fields of film and/or video. Research papers, screenings, critical essays, readings. Prerequisite: one cinema course or consent of instructor. Repeatable.
CINE-326
Credit Hours:
4
History of Cinema
An overview of some major trends in the history of cinema from its invention to the present. Individual films provide a basis for the exploration of the larger developments in technology, economics, politics, and culture that make up their historical context. The course also focuses on the development of critical skills for assessing arguments about film history, including analyzing written historical texts, comparing and contrasting competing historical arguments, and conducting film-historical research. The scope of the course is international, and encompasses a variety of important periods, film genres and modes, and national film movements. Required weekly film screenings. Required for all Cinema majors and minor; it is recommended that majors and minors complete CINE 326 by the end of their second year.
CINE-328
Credit Hours:
4
Screenwriting
A workshop-style course on dramatic narrative writing for the screen. Students learn the specific format of the standard film script, but more importantly engage in critical examination of the unique nature of cinematic narrative in both feature length and short films. The course considers both classical narrative film and its alternatives, including art cinema, independent film, and the short film. Analysis of scripts and finished films alike is supplemented by readings from screenwriting manuals and scholarly writing on narrative form, addressing such things as plot structure, character, dramatic conflict, description, and dialogue. As a writing workshop, the course also emphasizes general aspects of good writing technique and the processes of editing and revision. Frequent exercises and assignments in and out of class allow students to hone specific writing skills and develop their understanding of narrative form and ability to create compelling stories. No Prerequisites. Cinema elective; open to non-majors.
CINE-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
CINE-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
CINE-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CINE-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CINE-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Cinema
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CINE-407
Credit Hours:
4
Jr./Sr. Film Production Seminar
These seminars vary from year-to-year, and offer junior and senior cinema students intensive inquiry into specific cinematic production topics. Prerequisite: CINE 410 or consent of instructor. Repeatable.