BLST-370
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Black Studies
BLST-384
Credit Hours:
4
Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
This course critically examines the history of the social construction of race and ethnicity in Latin America. In it, we will explore how historians have employed race and ethnicity as methodological categories in order to elucidate the histories of Latin America from the pre-Hispanic era through the modern period. Particularly we will focus on the various attempts by the ruling elite to deploy race in the ordering of society; and, how the non-elite resisted the imposition of those elite conceptions of racial and ethnic hierarchies to create their own codes of conduct, and how those conflicts have changed over time.
BLST-385
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Project
BLST-390
Credit Hours:
4
Topics in Black Studies
BLST-391
Credit Hours:
4
Comparative Slavery in the Americas
For many, the history of slavery is synonymous with the United States South. But slavery was not limited to the US and by approaching slavery from a comparative perspective, we will deepen our understanding of slavery as an institution, slaves as historical actors, and therefore the legacies of slavery throughout the Americas. We will explore regional differences within slaves' opportunities to form families, to create cultures, to rebel, and to labor for their own benefits; as well as the interactions of African cultural visions and Christianity.
BLST-422
Credit Hours:
1
Performance: African/Diasporan
New and reconstructed works choreographed by faculty and guest artists in African/Diasporan dance are learned by students and rehearsed for public performance. Participation can include attending biweekly company classes and contributing to the production of the performance. Differences in course number refer to genres of performance work. By audition or invitation only; auditions are typically held during the first two weeks of each semester or immediately preceding a short residency by a guest artist. Cross-listed with Dance 422.
BLST-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
BLST-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
CHEM-131
Credit Hours:
4
Atoms and Molecules: Structure and Dynamics
This course is an introduction to the study of chemical phenomena using an "atoms-first" approach -- starting with atoms and building up to more complex molecules. Students will explore principles of atomic structure, molecular bonding and structure, electronic properties, intermolecular forces in all phases of matter, chemical equilibrium, and thermodynamics. Core concepts will be taught through active learning, and laboratory investigation will develop skills in foundational quantitative analysis (measurement, stoichiometry, error analysis) and spectroscopy. Cognitive skills in graphical and written presentation of chemistry developed in this course will be built on in subsequent courses. This course satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly.
CHEM-132
Credit Hours:
4
Organic Structure and Reactivity
This course builds on the foundation of molecular structural and electronic properties developed in CHEM 131. Students will be introduced to chemical reactions of inorganic and organic compounds, including acid/base reactions, precipitation reactions and substitution and elimination reactions. In-depth analysis of reaction chemistry will encompass aspects of equilibrium, thermodynamics, and kinetics. The principles of conformation and stereochemistry of organic and inorganic molecules, and organic reaction mechanisms will be emphasized. Skills in presentation of scientific data, and experimental design and analysis will be developed and built on in subsequent courses. Prerequisite: CHEM 131. This course satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly.
CHEM-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Chemistry
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CHEM-212
Credit Hours:
4
Environmental Chemistry
A study of the chemistry of the atmosphere, natural water, and soils with a special focus on acid precipitation, greenhouse gases, ozone depletion, urban and indoor air pollution, water and soil pollution, solid and hazardous waste disposal and risk assessment. Prerequisites 121-122 or 131-132. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. This course can be used to satisfy a minor in chemistry. Safety glasses required.
CHEM-251
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Organic Chemistry
This course expands upon concepts in molecular structure and behavior presented in CHEM 131 and CHEM 132 and applies them to the systematic investigation of the reactivity of organic molecules. Students will explore the transformation and reaction chemistry of organic functional groups, including alcohols, aromatics, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and their derivatives. Reactions are explored with an emphasis on the mechanism of reactivity, and in the context of organic synthesis with a focus on the art of retrosynthetic analysis for complex targets. Laboratory experiments are selected to introduce techniques for the synthesis, purification, and analysis of organic compounds discussed in class. Offered in the fall only. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Safety glasses required. Prerequisite: CHEM 132.
CHEM-258
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Biochemistry
A study of the major chemical processes and molecular species that characterize living organisms. Principles of molecular structure and chemical reactivity from CHEM 131, 132, and 251 will be developed in greater quantitative detail and applied to investigation of the molecular interactions that underlie cellular life. Primary emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between the structures of biological macromolecules (particularly proteins) and their functions. Laboratory work will consist of a series of multi-week experiments focused on the isolation and subsequent characterization of active biological macromolecules from living organisms. Offered in the spring only. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: CHEM 251 and BIOL 150, or consent of instructor.
CHEM-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Chemistry
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CHEM-300
Credit Hours:
Chemistry & Biochemistry Assessment I
A pass/fail course used to track all chemistry and biochemistry majors' completion of the required third-year departmental assessment exam. Earning the required S (pass) in this course entails completion of the assessment exam with a passing score as designated by the department.
CHEM-317
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry
This course in inorganic chemistry investigates the structural and bonding models of molecules using concepts of symmetry and molecular orbitals. Investigation of reactions and intermolecular forces is done in the context of inorganic substances. The classroom portion includes introduction to and an oral presentation on the primary literature of the discipline while the laboratory portion includes synthesis of molecules and measurement of their properties. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: CHEM 258, or consent of instructor.
CHEM-331
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Analytical Chemistry
A course of quantitative analytical chemistry, based on principles of chemical equilibrium and thermodynamics. The laboratory includes exposure to a range of gravimetric and volumetric methods along with spectroscopic, chromatograhic, and electrochemical techniques for analysis. Three class periods and one laboratory period weekly. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisite: CHEM 258, or consent of instructor.
CHEM-343
Credit Hours:
0-4
Intermediate Physical Chemistry
An examination of the physical properties of chemical systems from both macroscopic and microscopic points of view. Topics include thermodynamics, structure and bonding from a quantum mechanical point of view, an introduction to spectroscopy, and chemical kinetics. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly. Offered spring semester only. Prerequisite: CHEM 258, MATH 124 and PHYS 121, or consent of instructor.
CHEM-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Laboratory (or library) research, in consultation with a member of the chemistry faculty. Offered to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites: Consent of faculty mentor. Hours arranged. Safety glasses required.
CHEM-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Laboratory (or library) research, in consultation with a member of the chemistry faculty. Offered to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites: Consent of faculty mentor. Hours arranged. Safety glasses required.
CHEM-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CHEM-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CHEM-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Chemistry
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CHEM-400
Credit Hours:
Chemistry % Biochemistry Assessment II
A pass/fail course used to track all chemistry and biochemistry majors' completion of the required senior interview. Earning the required S (pass) in this course entails completing the senior interview in good faith. Students who are not adequately prepared will be required to retake the interview.
CHEM-421
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Biochemistry: Modern Techniques
An in-depth exploration of modern techniques in biochemistry research. The focus will be on how the structure and function of biological macromolecules are investigated with a historical perspective of seminal studies leading to a detailed discussion of the most modern laboratory techniques ind instrumentation. Topics will vary, but may include DNA and protein crystallography, NMR, genomics, proteomics, radiotracers, microarrays, and other topics from the current scientific literature. Three class periods and one three-hour research/writing laboratory weekly. Prerequisite" CHEM 317 or CHEM 331 or CHEM 343 or consent of instructor.
CHEM-427
Credit Hours:
4
Synthetic Organic Chemistry: Designing Molecules and Materials
This course will explore the art of modern organic synthesis. This includes learning the chemistry behind current organic techniques and reactions, as well as gaining an understanding of design strategies to achieve complex molecules and functional materials. Students will engage with the synthesis strategies of several key pharmaceutical targets and the motivations for their exploration (drugs design). This class will also explore the fundamental principles governing the properties of modern organic materials, from compostable plastics to flat screen TVs. In addition, throughout this course students will engage in the process of proposal writing, from idea development to finished proposal. Three class periods and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: CHEM 317 or CHEM 331 or CHEM 343 or consent of instructor.
CHEM-446
Credit Hours:
4
Chemistry in 2D: Surface Chemistry and its applications
This course will explore the chemistry and physics behind monolayers and the interfacial phenomena that control the behavior of these single molecule thick films. We will connect what we know about 3D or bulk systems (such as the thermodynamics, intermolecular interactions, and phase behavior) to a 2D surface environment. This course thus reviews and builds on the topics presented in physical chemistry. Our discussion of monolayers and surfaces will also include common measurement techniques. The second part of this course will discuss modern applications of and the use of monolayers (and bilayers) as models to study topics in biophysics and materials science. The specific applications covered will vary with student interest. Three class periods and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: CHEM 343 or consent of instructor.
CHEM-449
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Topics in Biochemistry: Nucleic acids
An in-depth exploration of modern topics in the field of nucleic acids. A focus will be on macromolecular structure and intermolecular interactions between proteins and nucleic acids, and the effects of these on biological systems and scientific research. Topics will vary, but may include restriction enzymes, RNA silencing, RNA-directed prokaryotic immunity, riboswitches, and other topics from the current scientific literature. Three class periods and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: CHEM 317 or CHEM 331 or CHEM 343 or consent of instructor.
CHEM-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Laboratory research for qualified seniors working under faculty supervision. Students who wish to qualify for graduation with honors must first enroll in these courses. Prerequisite: Staff approval. Hours arranged. Safety glasses required.
CHEM-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
Laboratory research for qualified seniors working under faculty supervision. Students who wish to qualify for graduation with honors must first enroll in these courses. Prerequisite: Staff approval. Hours arranged. Safety glasses required.
CHIN-111
Credit Hours:
4
Beginning Chinese I
A comprehensive introductory course in modern standard Chinese through the four basic skills: aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The two beginning courses will concentrate on correct pronunciation and the four tones as well as the basic grammatical patterns.
CHIN-112
Credit Hours:
4
Beginning Chinese II
A comprehensive introductory course in modern standard Chinese through the four basic skills: aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The two beginning courses will concentrate on correct pronunciation and the four tones as well as the basic grammatical patterns.
CHIN-206
Credit Hours:
4
Dream and Fantasy in East Asian Literature
Through close analysis of some of the most important recurrent themes, this course will examine how the Chinese and Japanese literary traditions reinvent and revitalize themselves in their development. Students will also study the distinctive features of the major genres in the two traditions.
CHIN-211
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Chinese
Development of conversational skills. Comprehensive grammar will be the core of the course, along with further development of reading ability and more extensive oral practice. Prerequisite: 112.
CHIN-212
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Chinese II
Further development of fluency in conversation and in reading. Emphasis on the students' ability to write Chinese characters through composition exercises. Prerequisite: 211.
CHIN-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Chinese
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CHIN-305
Credit Hours:
4
Philosophical Taoism in Chinese Literature
This course examines a special group of Chinese texts that will not only enlighten, but also delight modern readers: ancient Taoist texts written in fascinating literary style, and a variety of literary works informed with Taoist spirit. No knowledge of Chinese is required. (Normally offered in the spring)
CHIN-311
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Chinese
This course is designed for students who have completed two years of college-level Chinese and are ready to move on from the intermediate to the advanced level. Besides the topics provided by the textbook, students will also work on conversation topics drawn from newspaper articles and other media sources on social-cultural issues in China. By the end of the semester, students should be able to comprehend Chinese used in various contexts, to write short essays, and to discuss subject-oriented issues. Prerequisite: Chinese 212 or equivalent.
CHIN-312
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Chinese
This course further develops students' basic skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) in mandarin Chinese. The emphasis is placed on vocabulary building and extended mastery of sentence structures of Modern Chinese through reading, writing, and related communicative activities. Prerequisite: Chinese 311 or equivalent.
CHIN-340
Credit Hours:
4
Chinese Cinema in English: A Cultural and Literary Study
With the aid of modern critical theories, students will study the most representative works of Chinese cinema since the mid-1980s. By analyzing the origins, themes and styles of the films, students can hope to have a better understanding of the main cultural and literary trends in contemporary China and of modern Chinese society in general. The course will be conducted in English.
CHIN-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Readings in Chinese texts.
CHIN-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
Readings in Chinese texts.
CHIN-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CHIN-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CINE-104
Credit Hours:
4
Film Aesthetics and Analysis
An introduction to the study of cinema as an art form. The focus is on the analysis of narrative (as well as some non-narrative forms of cinema) and film style (the elements of film technique such as editing, cinematography, lighting and color, staging, and sound). Students learn to identify these elements of cinema aesthetics and analyze the ways in which they work in a variety of different types of film, including Hollywood films, art cinema, documentary, and avant-garde/experimental film. Required weekly film screenings. Required for all Cinema majors and minors: majors and minors should complete CINE 104 by the end of their first year.
CINE-150
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Cinema
Selected topics in Cinema.
CINE-219
Credit Hours:
4
Elementary Cinema Production
An introductory digital production course exploring the nature of the cinematic medium from the point of view of production and technique, with an emphasis upon cinema as an aesthetic form. Each student will complete a series of projects in the digital format. Students are required to share in the expenses of their digital productions. Required of Cinema majors. No prerequisites.
CINE-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Cinema
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CINE-308
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Animation
Animation is the illusion of motion created by the consecutive display of slightly varying drawings or models of static elements. In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of traditional animation techniques, as well as cover many aspects of the more experimental contemporary forms of stop-motion animation processes. Students will be given several animation "studies" over the course of the semester that will offer them experience with different types of stop-motion and computer key-framed techniques, as well as experience in story-boarding, sound recording, character movement and rig development, and post digital effects work. In addition to workshop projects, students will be exposed to outside readings and film viewings.
CINE-310
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Cinema Production
An introductory course in 16mm film examining this chemical-based medium in both theory and practice. Each student will complete a series of short film projects with an emphasis on film grammar, film aesthetics, and all facets of film production. Students are required to share in the expenses of their film productions. Required of Cinema majors. Prerequisite: CINE 219.
CINE-312
Credit Hours:
4
Cinema Seminar
The subject for these seminars varies from year to year, and offers the advanced student of cinema intensive and humanistic investigation of specialized generic, stylistic, and creative problems in the fields of film and/or video. Research papers, screenings, critical essays, readings. Prerequisite: one cinema course or consent of instructor. Repeatable.
CINE-326
Credit Hours:
4
History of Cinema
An overview of some major trends in the history of cinema from its invention to the present. Individual films provide a basis for the exploration of the larger developments in technology, economics, politics, and culture that make up their historical context. The course also focuses on the development of critical skills for assessing arguments about film history, including analyzing written historical texts, comparing and contrasting competing historical arguments, and conducting film-historical research. The scope of the course is international, and encompasses a variety of important periods, film genres and modes, and national film movements. Required weekly film screenings. Required for all Cinema majors and minor; it is recommended that majors and minors complete CINE 326 by the end of their second year.
CINE-328
Credit Hours:
4
Screenwriting
A workshop-style course on dramatic narrative writing for the screen. Students learn the specific format of the standard film script, but more importantly engage in critical examination of the unique nature of cinematic narrative in both feature length and short films. The course considers both classical narrative film and its alternatives, including art cinema, independent film, and the short film. Analysis of scripts and finished films alike is supplemented by readings from screenwriting manuals and scholarly writing on narrative form, addressing such things as plot structure, character, dramatic conflict, description, and dialogue. As a writing workshop, the course also emphasizes general aspects of good writing technique and the processes of editing and revision. Frequent exercises and assignments in and out of class allow students to hone specific writing skills and develop their understanding of narrative form and ability to create compelling stories. No Prerequisites. Cinema elective; open to non-majors.
CINE-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
CINE-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
CINE-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CINE-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CINE-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Cinema
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
CINE-407
Credit Hours:
4
Jr./Sr. Film Production Seminar
These seminars vary from year-to-year, and offer junior and senior cinema students intensive inquiry into specific cinematic production topics. Prerequisite: CINE 410 or consent of instructor. Repeatable.
CINE-408
Credit Hours:
4
Jr./Sr. Film Studies Seminar
These seminars vary from year-to-year, and offer junior and senior cinema students intensive inquiry into specialized topics in film studies. Prerequisite: CINE 104 or consent of Instructor. Repeatable.
CINE-410
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Cinema Production
A production course designed for the advanced student of cinema. A rigorous and intensive practical course in the techniques of sound motion picture production. Working in the 16mm format, students complete a series of individual and group projects. Students learn the fundamentals of production management, camera work, sensitometry, lighting, sound recording and mixing, double-system editing, printing and laboratory processes. Students are required to share in the expenses of their productions. Required of Cinema majors. Prerequisite: CINE 310.
CINE-412
Credit Hours:
4
Theory of Cinema
This course examines major concepts and important writings in film theory from the 1920s to the present. Students engage with a wide variety of theories: on the nature of cinema as an art form, its relationship to the other arts, its meaning-making capacities, its aesthetic and psychological powers, and its potential social and political effects. Theories are critically examined for their argumentative structures and use of evidence, and assessed in comparison to other theories. The scope of the course typically includes Modernist and realist film theories of the "classical" period, and more recent approaches to film theory informed by structuralism and post-structuralism, semiotics, Marxism, feminism, psychoanalytic and cognitive psychology, and queer theory. Required weekly film screenings. Prerequisite: CINE 104. Required for all Cinema majors; Typically only offered during the fall semester.
CINE-419
Credit Hours:
4
Cinema Workshop
Designed for a limited number of students who have demonstrated significant ability in cinema production. The course involves students in the creation of works of cinematic art in 16mm sound format as a total process from script to screen. Some advanced video production may be permissible, by consent. Students are required to share in the expenses of their productions. Repeatable up to a limit of 16 credit hours. It should be noted that Cinema Workshop is not designed to provide professional training but rather to permit students to explore their creative abilities while employing professional tools and procedures. Prerequisites: CINE 410.
CINE-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
CINE-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
CLAS-101
Credit Hours:
4
Classical Culture
This is an introductory course in the history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome, focusing on particular topics relating to classical culture, and emphasizing the analysis of textual and material evidence.
CLAS-201
Credit Hours:
4
Ancient Greece
An overview of Ancient Greek civilization from the Bronze Age to the period following the death of Alexander the Great. Greek culture was a Mediterranean phenomenon that spread in antiquity from the Aegean through Egypt and central Asia to India and became the core of education for European and American students during the 18th and 19th centuries. The course focuses on the major social and political institutions (such as the creation of the first democracy) as well as the intellectual and artistic achievements of the Greeks.
CLAS-202
Credit Hours:
4
Ancient Rome
A survey of Roman civilization from both an historical and cultural perspective. Chronologically, the course traces the development of the "eternal city" from a tiny village of mud and straw along the banks of the Tiber River in central Italy to the city of marble and bronze dominating the Mediterranean world and beyond. Culturally, we consider Rome's legacy to the western world in terms of its social and political institutions, as well as its intellectual and artistic achievements.
CLAS-221
Credit Hours:
4
Classical Mythology
This course is a study of the mythology of classical antiquity, with an emphasis on its representations in literature and art, and its relationship to the practice and rituals of Greek and Roman religion.
CLAS-301
Credit Hours:
4
Topics in Classical Antiquity
Seminar course on a particular era or topic in Greco-Roman antiquity. Topics rotate by semester, but have included: 'Women in Antiquity,' 'Race and Ethnicity in Antiquity,' 'Ancient Democracies,' and 'Greek and Roman Drama.' This course may be taken more than once.
CLAS-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
CLAS-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
CLAS-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CLAS-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
CLAS-440
Credit Hours:
1
Senior Classics Symposium
This is a required course for senior majors in Classics, ancient Greek or Latin. It is a seminar providing an overview of Greek and Roman culture in preparation for the Senior Comprehensive examinations.
CLAS-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
CLAS-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
COMM-101
Credit Hours:
4
Public Address
This course is designed to help students develop skills for effective oral communication. At a minimum, students will emerge more confident on the public platform. When refined by practice and experience, the critical thinking, composition, and performance skills learned should prove most useful in personal and professional endeavors.
COMM-108
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Writing for Print and Online
This course focuses on the fundamentals of reporting and writing nonfiction for print. Topics include storytelling and narrative, lead writing, point of view, information gathering, interviewing, and more. The class aims to help students develop overall research, writing, and thinking skills; questioning, listening, and interviewing skills; and a more sophisticated understanding of print journalism. (Offered fall only)
COMM-111
Credit Hours:
4
Ethics and Society
This course explores communication ethics from philosophical and applied perspectives in a variety of social contexts. Weekly theoretical discussions are grounded in applied cases that revolve around issues such as whistleblowing, free speech, group think, lying, confidentiality, privacy, coercion, and consensus.
COMM-115
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Communication
Special Topics in Communication provides a venue in which to explore in some depth an aspect or issue related to communication study. May be taken more than once by majors or non-majors to address special topics.
COMM-122
Credit Hours:
4
Argumentation
In this course students will explore the art of inquiry and advocacy known as argumentation. In order to become better audiences and practitioners of argument, students will consider the nature of argument, the building blocks of argument and the practice of argument in public debate.
COMM-126
Credit Hours:
4
Media Structures
This course is designed to initiate students into critical and intelligent debates surrounding the issue of communication and its pertinence to mass, modern and postmodern societies. We consider specifically how mass communication has been defined from the 19th through to the beginning of the 21st Century and how this history is relevant to issues of mass society today. Given that almost every person in America is affected by mass culture and media, we will discuss through the lectures, discussions and exercises a number of controversial suggestions, critical paradigms and mainstream assumptions. Throughout the course, students will be expected to understand these approaches and be able to both criticize and recognize the legitimacy of these models.
COMM-130
Credit Hours:
4
Freedom of Speech
Freedom of Speech introduces students to the dimensions of oral discourse both as practiced in a community of citizens and theoretically viewed through various legal interpretations. We will examine how the first amendment rights have been defended and impinged within academic settings, throughout historical periods of political unrest and war, and in daily exchanges marked by hate, defamation and obscenity.
COMM-140
Credit Hours:
4
The Politics of Popular Culture
The terrain of popular culture has historically been a site of contentious struggles and debates. For long (as is the case even today) one's cultural "taste" was a significant factor in determining one's standing in the social hierarchy. Debates about "high" vs "low" culture and about what cultural texts and practices must stand in to represent a community have involved some of the most well known intellectuals in history. Analyzing the trajectory of these debates over the years provides us with a lens through which to understand historical social changes. It also allows us to appreciate that several contemporary debates (for instance about the cultural meaning of Hip Hop or Reality TV) have historical precedents that inform and precede them. This introductory course seeks to trace those debates from their origins in middle century Europe to their culmination into contemporary battles over popular culture. In so doing it seeks to politicize popular culture and unravel the competing ideologies and worldviews embedded within it. We begin by reading some of the prominent theorists of "high" culture and then problematize their arguments by studying the challenges to them (most stridently posed by the Birmingham school of scholars). We will then use this historical debate to inform our understanding of the contemporary world of popular culture in America. In the process we will also learn various ways to analyze and critique objects of popular culture around us that we often unthinkingly consume.
COMM-147
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Media Literacy
While most of us are proficient consumers of visual electronic media - we have the speed of symbol-recognition and comprehension skills to be adept "readers" - few of us have learned to bring to that reading the critical skills we learn in the study of literature, music or art. This course examines how sound and images construct the "realities" that media presumably represent.
COMM-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Communication
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
COMM-205
Credit Hours:
4
Global Communication
The purpose of the course is to acquire an understanding of the key concepts and ideas about globalization and the role the mass media plays in the process. While the term "globalization" has been bandied about among the popular press, academic and the business community, this course will attempt to contextualize and ground the concept by developing a multiperspectival approach to some of the political, economic and social processes that have been associated with the development of a world communication system. Throughout the course, we will examine the growing centrality that the mass media and information technologies play in our daily lives and the ways in which they contribute to or hinder our daily practices of identity, community and culture in a global context.
COMM-211
Credit Hours:
4
Thinking with Ethics
This course will help students discover how to better recognize ethical questions when they stumble across them and to explore how, when we do, we lean into them rather than turn away. What makes it possible for us to think, listen and speak with ethics? We will explore a range of public and private ethical questions that arise in the everyday lives of college students such as, for example: privacy & free speech, conformity & dissent, accountability & care, trust & truthfulness, propaganda & censorship, power & privilege, whistleblowing & secrecy, and alterity & responsibility.
COMM-215
Credit Hours:
4
Communication Special Topics
Special Topics in Communication provides a venue in which to explore in depth an aspect or issue related to communication study. May be taken more than once by majors or non-majors to address special topics.
COMM-221
Credit Hours:
4
Theories of Group Communication
This course explores the communication processes in and around social, organizational and political groups. The dynamic nature of group formation, flexibility and sustainability will serve as the foundation of the course. Questions regarding the desire for belonging, how belonging gets enacted, and the tensions of group identification and membership will serve as the thread for exploring groups in a variety of contexts.
COMM-223
Credit Hours:
4
Rhetoric
Rhetoric is the art of the spoken and written word, and its study and practice has been the foundation of a liberal education for two thousand years. It grounds the traditions and practices of politics, law, commerce and religion, and its power is felt in every sphere of public life. In this course we focus on the practice and theory of rhetoric as the medium of civic engagement, and the constituting act of self and community.
COMM-224
Credit Hours:
4
Theories of Interpersonal Communication
This course provides students with an interpretive and critical perspective for investigating the process of our making social worlds. Students will analyze interactional patterns of communication in personal and cultural mythology, in family communication, and in college students' culture.
COMM-225
Credit Hours:
4
US Broadcast History and Theory
This class explores the history of radio and television broadcasting in the U.S. since the 1910s, analyzing radio and television programs within their social and industrial contexts and considering the ways that these texts are understood by audiences. We will pay particular attention to the political, economic, and cultural roles of the media in twentieth-century U.S. history, drawing connections to radio and television's quickly changing present. We will also examine how history itself is researched and written, introducing you to theories and methods in historiography.
COMM-227
Credit Hours:
4
New Literacy Lab
Digital technology is merging traditional communication modalities of voice, text, and image into ever new forms of representation and interaction, changing many aspects of our lives profoundly, not only in terms of personal and business relationships, consumer habits, work environments, and civic engagement, but even in the ways we understand ourselves, relate to each other, and form identities. Students will explore the creative potential of these communication forms in a lab practicum closely tied to the exploration of their existential impact in theory readings and class discussions.
COMM-229
Credit Hours:
4
Mediating Gender and Sexuality
In this class we will examine and evaluate the cultural construction and representation of gender and sexuality in contemporary American mass media, and trace their development throughout the 20th century. We will focus on a variety of mass-produced commercial media texts, surveying television, magazines, advertising, and popular music. Although gender is the primary identity construction examined in this course, we will also pay close attention to other aspects of identity that define American women, such as ethnicity, class, and sexuality. We will investigate representational issues in relation to their political repercussions, and draw from a broad range of academic literature, including feminist television criticism, film theory, cultural studies, communication theory, and popular music criticism. Cross-listed with QS 229 and WMST 229.
COMM-232
Credit Hours:
4
Theories of Public and Private Performance
How do we perform our identitites in everyday life? What role does everyday performativity play in constituting us as raced, gendered, and classed subjects? How do cultural performances (musical concerts, sporting events, or dance) help us better understand ourselves and our society? In this class we examine a range of theories that see private behaviors and public performances as rehearsed, audience-oriented, and creative acts. Theorists such as Erving Goffman, Judith Butler, Pierre Bourdieu, and Victor Turner will guide our examination of both "everyday" performativity (in regrd to bodily stigma and identities of class, race, gender, and sexuality) and cultural performances (such as musical concerts, sporting events, and dance). Students will learn how to analyze their own behavior as a cultural text and to discern the textual, acoustic, and embodied dimensions of cultural performances. They will practice illuminating how performances can reinforce or disrupt the social order, while creating the self in community.
COMM-239
Credit Hours:
4
Racialized Perspectives of Media
This course critically examines the forms that racial and ethnic representations have taken in American media. The course will attempt to chart changes in public perception of racial and ethnic difference in the context of cultural and social transformations, as well as adjustments in the U.S. media industry. We will first establish a foundational knowledge of media criticism and explore theories and perspectives on how ethnicity is experienced in American culture. We will then focus on the topic of the representation of ethnicity in American media, surveying it historically, in relation to specific ethnic groups, at particular moments, and in a variety of genres.
COMM-244
Credit Hours:
4
Theories of Intercultural Communication
This course examines the processes and politics of intercultural communication in both domestic and international contexts. Students will enhance their cross-cultural awareness by exploring differences in value orientations, thought patterns and (non)verbal behaviors, challenges of transition and adaptation across cultures, identity management in intercultural settings, intergroup relationship development and conflict resolution, and intercultural communication competence and ethics. Throughout the course, special considerations will be given to power and privilege issues in bridging differences and embracing diversity.