QS-101
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Queer Studies
A survey of the legal regulation of sexuality and gender in the 19th and 20th centuries and the emergence of modern civil rights movements of sexual minorities. This course will focus on the history, strategies, conflicts, and issues associated with these political and social movements.
QS-201
Credit Hours:
4
Queer Theory
An interdisciplinary course designed to introduce students to historical and theoretical treatments of topics such as the essentialism vs. constructionism debate; intersections of race/gender/class and sexual orientation; science and representation; performativity and normativity; and ethics, politics and law. Cross-listed with WMST 379.
QS-213
Credit Hours:
4
Queer Graphix
Through a series of drawing and printmaking projects, this studio art course seeks to explore and creatively express queer culture, aesthetics and GLBT art history, as well as notions of identity, gender, orientation and sexuality. Art students will employ traditions of journalistic comics, collage, screen-printing, photo-copies, community collaborative artistic work (zines) and research presentation projects to not only celebrate queer artistic practices but also reveal the often damaging impact society and politics has on self identity and expression.
QS-215
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Biology
This is a special topics course originating in the Biology Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in Biology that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering this course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-229
Credit Hours:
4
Mediating Gender and Sexuality
In this class we will examine and evaluate the cultural construction and representation of gender and sexuality in contemporary American mass media, and trace their development throughout the 20th century. We will focus on a variety of mass-produced commercial media texts, surveying television, magazines, advertising, and popular music. Although gender is the primary identity construction examined in the course, we will also pay close attention to other aspects of identity that define American women, such as ethnicity, class, and sexuality. We will investigate representational issues in relation to their political repercussion, and draw from a broad range of academic literature, including feminist television criticism, film theory, cultural studies, communication theory, and popular music criticism. Cross listed with COMM 229.
QS-235
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Black Studies
An introductory study of the Black experience in America, this course will survey the field by examining in series, the various social institutions that comprise Black American life. Students will be introduced to fundamental contemporary issues in the study of Black religion, politics, economics and the family. Additionally, this course will serve as an introduction to Afrocentricity, "the emerging paradigm in Black Studies," and to the new scholarship on Blacks in America.
QS-236
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Communication
This is a special topics course originating in the Communication Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in Communication that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering the course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-240
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Dance
This is a special topics course originating in the Dance Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in Dance that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering the course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-245
Credit Hours:
4
Human Diversity Through Literature
A study of selected works by and about bisexual, gay, lesbian and transgender people.
QS-250
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Literature
This is a special topics course originating in the English Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in English that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering the course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-260
Credit Hours:
4
Human Sexuality
A survey of psychological and biological aspects of sexuality. Topics include prenatal sexual differentiation, sexual anatomy, physiology of sexual response, contraceptive behavior, sexually transmissible infections, sexual dysfunction, and cancer and other diseases of the reproductive system. Prerequisite PSYC 100. Cross-listed with PSYC 260.
QS-268
Credit Hours:
1-4
Topics in Queer Studies
QS-275
Credit Hours:
4
Philosophy of Feminism
Feminism can radically challenge traditional ways of doing philosophy. In asking why women and women's experience seem to be missing from the tradition of philosophy, it implicitly questions philosophy's claim to objectivity, universality, and truth. Thus, feminist criticism probes some of the most fundamental philosophical assumptions about our knowledge of and interaction with the world and other people. Are there philosophically significant differences between men and women? This course examines this and other questions, emphasizing contemporary feminist discussions of epistemology, ethics, and science. Prerequisite: One previous course in Philosophy or Women's Studies or consent.
QS-280
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Religion
This is a special topics course originating in the Religion Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in Religion that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering the course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-281
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Theology
Theology is an attempt to understand ourselves and our world in relation to transcendent reality. It is simultaneously an attempt to state persuasively the claims of faith in relation to the controlling experiences of an era. The course will focus upon theological responses to issues like environmental deterioration, race and gender, violence and the death penalty.
QS-290
Credit Hours:
4
Issues in Feminism
This interdisciplinary course will examine some aspects of institutionalized sexism in contemporary America, such as differential role socialization and its consequences; legal inequalities; job discrimination; reproductive issues; and violence against women. Every woman's experience of sexism is mediated by her class, race, age, religion, sexual preference and so forth; therefore the diversity of women's experience is a key factor in our study. The class format will be primarily a lecture-discussion format and may include small group discussions.
QS-301
Credit Hours:
4
Seminar: Psychology of Women
This course reviews psychological research and theories on women. Topics include sex bias in psychological research, gender differences and similarities in personality and abilities, lifespan development, problems of adjustment and psychotherapy, language and communication, women's health, female sexuality, and violence against women (rape and wife battering). Prerequisites: PSYC 100, PSYC 200, and junior or senior status, or consent of instructor.
QS-311
Credit Hours:
4
Feminist Theory
This course examines various ways of understanding gender by looking at a variety of feminist theories. Theories studied may include psychoanalytic, feminist theory, cultural materialist feminist theory, etc. Particular consideration will be given to issues raised by multiculturalism, women of color, womanist perspectives, queer theory, class concerns, international and transnational movements. The course will introduce students to a variety of theories to enable them both to recognize and use those theories in their research and social practice. Students will be encouraged to become reflective about their own theoretical stances and to consider how societies can move closer to justice for both women and men. Prerequisite: one Women's Studies course or consent. (Fall)
QS-313
Credit Hours:
4
Families, Sexuality and the State
In this seminar we explore the ways in which race, ethnicity, social class and sexuality shape family/kinship structures in and beyond the contemporary U.S. We explore specific issues including sexuality and kinship; reproductive technologies and surrogacy; transnational families; and women's political activism in the context of families. These issues are explored using sociological, anthropological, and feminist theories. Prerequisite: S/A 100 or consent.
QS-315
Credit Hours:
4
Feminist Theory
This course examines various ways of understanding gender by looking at a variety of feminist theories. Theories studied may include psychoanalytic, feminist theory, cultural materialist feminist theory, etc. Particular consideration will be given to issues raised by multiculturalism, women of color, womanist perspectives, queer theory, class concerns, international and transnational movements. The course will introduce students to a variety of theories to enable them both to recognize and use those theories in their research and social practice. Students will be encouraged to become reflective about their own theoretical stances and to consider how societies can move closer to justice for both women and men. Prerequisite: One Women's Studies course or consent. (Fall)
QS-329
Credit Hours:
4
Gender and Communication
This course focuses on (1) the role of interpersonal, social and political communication in the construction of gender expectations in American culture, and (2) how those expectations get communicated/performed, and thus reified, in our daily lives. We will explore the complex interplay between self expectations and social expectations of gender that get expressed, challenged, and ultimately influenced by and within a variety of social and interpersonal contexts: education, the body, organizations, friends and family, romantic relationships, the media, and politics. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290.
QS-330
Credit Hours:
4
Gay and Lesbian Issues in Education
In this seminar students will examine gay and lesbian issues in what is, arguably, the most central social institution in contemporary American culture. We will begin with an introduction to sexuality, drawing upon scientific and historical scholarship, and collectively delineate critical issues regarding sexuality in U.S. schools. We will study Queer Theory as a foundation for the work to follow and read central texts in the queer history of education. We will read major legal documents regarding sexuality in the United States and secondary literature relating to them. In this section our focus will be on students' rights regarding Gay Straight Alliances, safety, and educators' employment rights. We will discuss gay and lesbian issues in a multicultural education framework in terms of issues identified by the class earlier in the semester.
QS-332
Credit Hours:
4
Music and Sexuality
QS-340
Credit Hours:
4
Social Movements
In this course we explore social movements as a primary means of social change. We attempt to understand the conditions which precede, accompany and follow collective action. Particular case studies for analysis will be drawn from the United States and cross-cultural contexts to illustrate that social movements are human products that have both intended and unintended consequences. This course is sometimes taught with a special subtitle: "Social Justice Movements in Communities of Color," cross-listed with the Black Studies Program. Prerequisite: SA 100 or consent.
QS-349
Credit Hours:
4
The Trouble with Normal: Normalization, Discourse and Power
One of the primary ways that social power and control are exercised is through the establishment and enforcement of "norms": gender norms, racial norms, sexuality norms, norms of able-bodiedness, norms of beauty and body size, and more. This course delves deeply into the theoretical literature of normalization, especially the work of Michel Foucault, and applies it to a wide range of topics including sexuality, disability, gender roles, body size, and more. The course is cross-listed with Communication. Prerequisites: COMM 280 and COMM 290 or consent of instructor.
QS-350
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics Literature
This is a special topics course originating in the English Department. This course provides a venue in which to explore topics in English that meet the requirements of an elective course in the Queer Studies Concentration. Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of the teaching faculty offering the course. In some cases, this course may be repeated for credit.
QS-351
Credit Hours:
4
Contemporary Drama
Intensive study of drama from 1956 to the present, with an emphasis on British and American playwrights. The course will focus on the issues, problems, techniques, and generic forms particular to contemporary drama, with interest in the emerging drama of minority, female, and gay and lesbian playwrights. Cross-listed with ENGL 340.
QS-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
QS-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
QS-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
QS-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
QS-383
Credit Hours:
4
Sex and Sexuality in Latin America
This course critically examines gender and sexuality in Latin America. Particularly it will explore the various attempts by the ruling elite to define acceptable and deviant gender roles and sexual identities, how the non-elite resisted the imposition of those elite notions of propriety to create their own codes of conduct, and how those conflicts have changed over time.
QS-400
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Seminar
This is a capstone course for the QS concentration during the spring semester, when it may also serve to help students apply Queer Theory to a senior project or honors project in their chosen major.
QS-402
Credit Hours:
4
Language, Identity and Politics: Discourse and the Public Sphere
This course examines the role of language and discourse in constructing, maintaining and transforming identities, publics and politics in late 20th century democracies. Throughout, we will consider the relationship between language use and unequal relations of power. We will begin with an introduction to discourse studies and explore discourse as symbolic power, social practice and ideology. Next, we will examine the role of discourse in constructing and maintaining identities and communities, including those of subaltern and marginalized publics. Finally, we will examine and critique the role of discourse in public sphere(s) from Afrocentric, feminist and queer perspectives.
QS-406
Credit Hours:
4
Rhetoric and Social Movements
This course focuses on the historical rhetorics of discontent and transformation. Students will examine the characteristics and functions of persuasive discourse produced by social movements; the ways in which symbolic action sought to shape perceptions of concrete realities. Of particular interest will be the intersection of cultural context, biography, and creative rhetorical strategy.
QS-416
Credit Hours:
4
Women in the U.S. Economy
This course will focus on the market and nonmarket contributions of women to the U.S. economy. A historical framework provides the backdrop for examining the economic, political and social institutions that affect women's contributions to the nation's economic well-being. Prerequisite: 301.
QS-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
QS-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research