Anthropology and Sociology

ANSO-100
Credit Hours:
4
People, Culture and Society
An examination of fundamental questions concerning the nature and foundations of sociocultural behavior. The course presents a variety of sociocultural approaches for understanding human nature and hominid evolution, cross-cultural similarities and differences, the sources of inequality, and the enormity of recent social change. This course is required of all majors and minors in Anthropology/Sociology and has no prerequisite.
ANSO-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ANSO-210
Credit Hours:
4
Sex and Gender in Society
This course compares and evaluates a variety of theories which attempt to explain the origins, persistence and effects of gender in American society. In particular, it explores a number of settings that may include: the family, the work place, the political arena, religious activity, violence against women, and face-to-face interactional contexts. Special attention is given to the ways in which race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation shape gender experiences. Although its primary focus is American society, the course compares problems of sexual inequality in American society with other, quite different, societies in order to gain a comparative understanding of how discrimination, prejudice, and structural inequality, wherever they are found, create special problems for women. Throughout, the focus is on learning to use structural, historical, and theoretical information as guides to understanding social change and the choices facing women and men. Cross-listed with WGST 210.
ANSO-212
Credit Hours:
4
Race and Enthnicity
Contrary to the expectations of many modern social theorists, race and ethnicity continue to be important elements in the lives of contemporary people, serving as frameworks through which individual identities, community actions, and cultural meanings are interpreted. This course will introduce students to the sociocultural analysis of racial and ethnic identities. How did ethnic and racial identities and communities develop over time? Why does race, though now understood to be a social rather than a biological category, continue to be (mis)understood as a biological category? How do aspects of political, class, gender, and sexual identities influence racial and ethnic identities? We will use a global perspective to understand the conception of race and ethnicity. We will explore these topics among others including cultural and historical variability of ethnic and racial categories, the dialectical formation of identity, and the persistence of certain forms of racial and ethnic prejudice. Students will be expected to examine critically their own common assumptions and presuppositions about race and ethnicity, and to begin developing the theoretical tools for interpreting life in an ethnically diverse world. Cross-listed with BLST 212.
ANSO-217
Credit Hours:
4
Religion and Society
This course investigates the relationship between religion and society, and the social dimension of religious truth-claims. The central theme entails a cross-cultural study of religious influences on both social stability and change or revolution. In exploring this tension between religion and existing socioeconomic and political orders, we will consider examples such as religious movements, as well as the ritual life of both the individual's life cycle and wider social and political institutions. This course has no prerequisite.
ANSO-221
Credit Hours:
4
Contemporary Japan
Japan often conjures images steeped in tradition such as samurai warriors, sumo wrestlers, and geisha clad in kimono. At the same time, however, contemporary Japan is just as easily associated with businessmen, anime, automobiles, and high technology. How have "tradition" and "change" fueled competing visions of Japan what it means to be "Japanese"? How does one go about reconciling these conflicting views? How have these debates evolved over time? How have variously situated individuals and groups in society negotiated shifting circumstances? These questions will be at the heart of this seminar as we consider case studies from different segments of Japanese society. A range of material will be treated as "texts" for analysis and discussion including anime, manga, literary works, and films as well as ethnographic scholarship on Japanese society.
ANSO-224
Credit Hours:
4
Human Origins and Prehistory
This course examines the topics of human origins, human nature, evolution, and prehistory, emphasizing the interplay between biological and sociocultural aspects of human life. Readings will draw from accounts of primate social behavior, hominid evolution, and archaeology to investigate the foundations of our uniquely human form of adaptation through culture. This course has no prerequisite.
ANSO-245
Credit Hours:
4
Studies in Anthropology and Sociology
Special topics in Anthropology and Sociology.
ANSO-290
Credit Hours:
4
The Development of Social Thought
An investigation of the classical foundations of social thought and sociocultural theory in sociology/anthropology. The course will concentrate on the original works of authors such as Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Durkheim, Martineau, DuBois and other significant authors of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This course is required of all majors and minors in anthropology and sociology. Prerequisite: ANSO 100 consent. No First Year students.
ANSO-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Anthropology/Sociology
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ANSO-316
Credit Hours:
4
Contemporary Sociocultural Theory
Analyses of central theoretical questions in anthropology and sociology. Historical developments and major paradigms within the two disciplines are explored. The process of theory construction is examined and a critical perspective developed. Required of majors. Prerequisites: ANSO 100 and 290.
ANSO-320
Credit Hours:
4
Contemporary African Peoples in Historical Perspective
This course is an examination of the historical, ethnic and socio-cultural diversity of sub-Saharan Africa societies. Central to this overview is an emphasis on the pre-colonial, colonial and postcolonial eras. It considers questions of economic development, urbanization, agricultural production and the relationship of the contemporary African state to rural communities. This course also explores symbolic systems in the context of rituals, witchcraft, indigenous churches, and new forms of Christianity currently spreading in Africa. Prerequisite: ANSO 100 or by consent.
ANSO-321
Credit Hours:
4
Anthropology of Human Rights
This seminar interrogates the social life of rights by situating human rights within critical analyses of law, society, and culture. A brief examination of key human rights documents and institutions will be followed by an analysis of topics and case studies selected to juxtapose Asian and Western contexts. A primary concern of this seminar will be to scrutinize how human rights get reworked and refashioned in a range of local settings by various actors on the ground pursing social justice. Prerequisite: ANSO 100 or consent.
ANSO-331
Credit Hours:
4
Culture, Society and the Individual
This course examines the relationship between individuals, their society and culture. This involves looking at differing cultural conceptions of "human nature", and the way in which both "intelligence" and the emotions are "cultural performances." The nature of the "self", indeed, the structure of perception and cognition, are not separable from specific patterns of sociocultural life. Finally, Western and cross-cultural examples will be used to assess different models of social determinism and the cultural impact of human decisions and action. Prerequisite: ANSO 100 or consent.
ANSO-338
Credit Hours:
4
Social Structure and Popular Culture
Under study here are the production and distribution, form and content, and artists and audiences of popular culture internationally. We will consider prominent social theories, from the Frankfort School's critique of popular culture, through the writings on mass culture in the United States, to the recent rehabilitation of popular culture by British writers like Stuart Hall and Paul Gilroy. Some of the major questions addressed will include: How do the social arrangements and the technologies of production shape the messages conveyed in popular media? What is the relationship between popular culture and "high" culture? Under what conditions does popular culture distract people from the struggles for equality and social justice, lulling them to passivity, and when can it inspire protest, or even transform people's behavior? Prerequisite: ANSO 100 or consent.
ANSO-339
Credit Hours:
4
Culture, Identity and Politics in Caribbean Society
This course focuses on the social, cultural and political life of the Caribbean area, especially the English and French speaking areas. A fragmented group of nations decidedly on the periphery of the global economy, the Caribbean was once one of the richest areas of the world. Its riches then depended on the labor of enslaved Africans; the fruits of the plantation economy were enjoyed mainly by European planters. What is the legacy of such a history? We review the variety of Caribbean policies, from the strong democratic traditions of Jamaica to the autocratic rulers of Haiti, and explore how the Caribbean's unique combination of cultural influences affect the political processes, ways of life, class divisions and ethnic stratification evident in the Caribbean today. Prerequisite: ANSO 100 or consent.
ANSO-340
Credit Hours:
4
Social Movements
In this course we explore social movements as a primary means of social change. We attempt to understand the conditions which precede, accompany and follow collective action. Particular case studies for analysis will be drawn from the United States and cross-cultural contexts to illustrate that social movements are human products that have both intended and unintended consequences. Prerequisite: ANSO 100 or consent.
ANSO-342
Credit Hours:
4
Non-Governmental Organizations, Development and Human Rights
This course is a critical and inter-disciplinary examination of the role and consequences of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the development industry. The course explores the history, organization and agenda building of NGOs since the 1950's. Power relationships between NGOs and states, particularly in the southern hemisphere, as well as with bilateral and multi-lateral institutions are pivotal to our examination. The ideological, programmatic and conceptual differences among NGOs are examined within the broader context of theories of development. We ask why growing numbers of people see NGOs as the answer to ameliorating poverty, disease, violations of human rights and environmental degradation, among others. Some of the organizations that we examine include Greenpeace, Amnesty International, the Grameen Bank and Working Women's Forum. Prerequisite: ANSO 100 or consent.
ANSO-343
Credit Hours:
4
Demography of Africa
In this course, we begin by reviewing current literature to clearly define the term, Demography. Next, we examine the demographic processes of population change in the continent of Africa. Demographic processes include mortality, fertility and migration. In addition, we explore patterns of urbanization, economic development and educational attainment. We analyze survey data from the African Census Analysis Project and Demographic Health Survey. Upon completion, you should be familiar with a variety of demographic processes that allow an examination of interesting demographic, social and anthropological questions. Prerequisite: ANSO 100.
ANSO-345
Credit Hours:
4
Special Problems
Special topics offered at an advanced level not covered in regular courses.
ANSO-347
Credit Hours:
4
Power in Society
Using theoretical approaches and methodological tools from anthropology and sociology, this course explores the nature of social power and its distribution in a variety of social settings. Under what conditions do specific types of power distributions emerge, and what consequences do they have for people's social and economic lives? When do political systems change, and why? How do social and cultural factors influence people's participation in political action? A variety of social institutions relevant to politics are examined in this course, including interest groups, political parties, the state and transnational organizations. Processes such as legitimization of authority, social influences on policy formation, political socialization, mobilization and co-optation are analyzed in the contexts of local, national and international politics. Prerequisite: ANSO 100 or consent.
ANSO-348
Credit Hours:
4
Semiotic: The Social Life of Signs
This course is an introduction to semiotic theory. Semiotic is the study of signs and representation. It is based upon the simple and perhaps surprising insight that things are meaningful only to the extent that they stand for something other than themselves. This is not simply a 'theory' class - this class will focus on the symbolic, empirical, material world. As a social science course, we will be concerned primarily with human semiosis, that is, the ways in which human being is manifest through and in signs, with a particular focus on the semiotic of C.S. Peirce. While no prior training in formal philosophy is required, some training in the study of human sociocultural practices will be helpful. Most of all, this course will endeavor to introduce students to some key aspects of Peirce's semiotic and phenomenology, all in the service of understanding our "glassy essence". Prerequisite: ANSO 100.
ANSO-350
Credit Hours:
4
Semiotic: The Social Life of Signs
This course is an introduction to semiotic theory. Semiotic is the study of signs and representation. It is based upon the simple and perhaps surprising insight that things are meaningful only to the extent that they stand for something other than themselves. This is not simply a 'theory' class - this class will focus on the symbolic, empirical, material world. As a social science course, we will be concerned primarily with human semiosis, that is, the ways in which human being is manifest through and in signs, with a particular focus on the semiotic of C.S. Peirce. While no prior training in formal philosophy is required, some training in the study of human sociocultural practices will be helpful. Most of all, this course will endeavor to introduce students to some key aspects of Peirce's semiotic and phenomenology, all in the service of understanding our "glassy essence". Prerequisite: ANSO 100.
ANSO-351
Credit Hours:
4
Survey Research Methods
This course provides experience in the design and implementation of sociocultural research. In addition to techniques of collecting, analyzing, interpreting and reporting data, we examine epistemological issues that underlie social research, ethical questions involved in research, and the theoretical assumptions on which various research strategies are based. Students will construct and implement research designs using survey research and secondary data analysis. Quantitative analysis, including descriptive and inferential statistics, analysis of variance, and simple regression will be included. Required of majors. ANSO 350 and 351 may be taken in any order. Prerequisite: ANSO 100 or consent.
ANSO-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
ANSO-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
ANSO-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ANSO-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
ANSO-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Adv topics in Anthropoly/Soc
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ANSO-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
ANSO-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
ANSO-460
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research Seminar
An integrative course designed to be a culmination of students' work in the major. This course focuses on the design and completion of semester-long research projects by senior majors. The course will provide the basis for reflection about the nature and importance of anthropology and sociology as disciplines and in relation to our role as researchers and citizens. Required of Senior Majors.

Arabic

ARAB-111
Credit Hours:
4
Beginning Arabic I
This is an introductory course to Arabic language and culture. It assumes no previous knowledge of Arabic and provides a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It starts with the alphabet and the number system and builds the four skills gradually and systematically through carefully selected and organized materials focusing on specific, concrete and familiar topics such as self identification, family, travel, food, renting an apartment, study, weather, etc. This course follows the underlying philosophy of the integrated approach to Arabic language instruction and culture. It is based on the integration of Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and spoken dialectical Arabic (Levantine) in a way that reflects the actual use of language by its native speakers.
ARAB-112
Credit Hours:
4
Beginning Arabic II
This sequential course builds on its pre-requisite (ARAB-111). It aims at further developing the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Themes covered during the course of the semester include: food and restaurants, shopping, study and education, jobs, doctors and health, transportation, weather, sports, hobbies and touristic places (Jordan, Palestine).
ARAB-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Arabic
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ARAB-211
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Arabic I
This is the first of a tw-course sequence of intermediate level in Arabic. The course continues building upon the linguistic foundations started in ARAB 111, and ARAB 112 and aims at further developing the four language skills through two graded levels: for the first half of the semester (the first 8 weeks), students will study topics that are centered around daily life activities. The second half of the semester takes students to a more advanced level with topics of general interest like the history and geography of the Arab world, education, etc. In addition, the course continues the practice of introducing Arab society, history, and culture. Students will also be reading longer passages (250-350 word), writing on the paragraph level, listening to longer texts, and producing longer conversations. Similar to its prerequiste ARAB 112, the course follows the same philosophi of integrating Modern Standard Arabic and Spoken Arabic. Overall, the course aims at improving students' linguistic knowledge from the Novice to the Intermediate Mid level, according to the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.
ARAB-212
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Arabic II
This course continues building upon the linguistic foundations started in ARAB-211. It aims at developing a higher level of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Arabic through the extensive use of graded materials on a wide variety of topics. The material covered is theme-based. This increases both quality and quantity of students' vocabulary and prepare them for more fluency and facility in understanding the language and communicating ideas with it. The themes covered include: Arab cities, Arabic language, food & drinks, health, sports, travelling & transportation and weather.
ARAB-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Arabic
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ARAB-300
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Arabic
This course will further develop students' linguistic skills in both Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and spoken Arabic. Specific topics will vary according to the interests of students and faculty. Prerequisite: Arabic 211 or equivalent.
ARAB-311
Credit Hours:
4
Advanced Arabic I
This course requires the completion of Intermediate Arabic II (ARAB 212) as its prerequisite. While this course continues to build upon the linguistic skills of ARAB 212, Advanced Arabic I (ARAB 311) primarily focuses on developing fluency in oral expression with the hope to reaching a native-like pronunciation (using educated spoken Arabic) and demonstrating accurate use of grammatical structures of Modern Standard Arabic. The material used for this course is chosen in such a way that develops students' linguistic skills across two proficiency levels: For the first 8 weeks of this semester, student will be dealing with topics at the intermediate high level including: law, politics in the Arab World, Palestine, military affairs, environment, and animals in the Arab World. For the second half of the semester, students proficiency level will be develop to handle topics at the mid advanced level, according to the ACTFL criteria. These topics are presented through authentic and unedited Arabic language materials on topics like minorities in the Arab World, Arab Americans, Arabic Language, health and sports.
ARAB-315
Credit Hours:
4
Culture of the Arab World
This course is an introduction to the culture of the Arab world. It aims at giving a comprehensive picture about Arabs and their culture. Students will read books and articles on a wide range of disciplines: history, geography, linguistics, anthropology, economy, women studies, politics and international relations, media, environment and religion. In addition, the course addresses the relationship between the Arab world and the West and issues like stereotyping (on both sides), anti-Americanism, and Islamic fundamentalism.
ARAB-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
ARAB-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study

Art History and Visual Culture

AHVC-096
Credit Hours:
0
Senior Symposium
AHVC-101
Credit Hours:
4
The Western World: Ancient to Baroque
This course is an introduction to selected themes, periods, and sites of visual production and built practice in Europe, the Mediterranean, and the New World. It focuses on a selected series of 'case studies' that integrate sites/monuments significant to the flow of Western art with period-specific and general critical issues. The relation of systems of visual and architectural representation to period-specific and current understandings of power, ritual, and the human body, as suggested through the disciplines of Art History and Visual Culture, will be key.
AHVC-111
Credit Hours:
4
Modern Art and Visual Culture
An introduction to the Art and Visual Culture of the Modern Age. This course examines the wide range of visual production of the Modern Age primarily in Europe and North America. It examines the concepts of the Modern, Modernity and Modernism. The class is taught through the lenses and using the methodologies of both Art History and Visual Culture, operating on the assumption that the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries are the age of visual culture. Thus, the class discusses both elite art and the rising popular culture.
AHVC-121
Credit Hours:
4
African Art and Visual Culture
This course examines the diverse arts and visual culture of Africa. The scope of this course ranges from pre-colonial to contemporary times, considering a selection of objects, concepts, and practices from across the continent. The subjects we learn about in this class take a variety of forms -- masks, sculptures, architecture, body decoration, painting, photography, film, and exhibitions -- all of which are important resources used by people to shape their lives and social worlds. The course is designed to provide you with an introduction to these art forms and the various socio-cultural, historical, critical, and aesthetic platforms from which they operate. For instance, selected objects, concepts, and practices will be discussed in the context of power relationships, constructions of gender, and the negotiation of tradition and modernity. Additionally, we will explore some of the key theoretical issues in the portrayal and interpretation of art and visual culture from this world area. This course is a Writing Intensive Seminar and students will complete three formal writing assignments and participate in writing workshops to develop their skills as writers.
AHVC-131
Credit Hours:
4
Asian Art and Visual Culture
An introduction to the art and visual culture of India, China, Japan and Southeast Asia focusing on historical, religious and social issues and the function of both art and visual culture.
AHVC-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Art
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
AHVC-201
Credit Hours:
4
Classical Art and Architecture
This course is an introduction to the art and architecture of Greece and Rome. Visual and spatial practices of religion and politics will be examined, focusing on Classical Athens and on Rome during the Late Republic and Early Empire. Selected works of art and architecture, and specific urban and exurban sites will be considered. Issues surrounding 'classical' forms and their subsequent role in Western art and architecture will be investigated.
AHVC-203
Credit Hours:
4
Early Renaissance Art and Architecture
This course is an introduction to the art, architecture, and selected patterns of urban development in Italy during the Early Renaissance and the Quattrocento. Focus will be on developments in Siena, Rome, and especially Florence. Issues surrounding 'classicism' and the development of new representational systems, new scales and materials in sculpture, new spatial and structural forms in architecture, and new relations to urbanism and centers of power and global expansion will be explored.
AHVC-204
Credit Hours:
4
High Renaissance and Baroque Art & Architecture
This course provides an introduction to the art, architecture, and selected patterns of urban development Rome during the High Renaissance, Mannerism, and the Baroque era through the papacy of Alexander VII (1655-67). Developments from ca. 1450 on in Rome leading to Julius II and the Roman High Renaissance will be a prime focus. Consideration of Mannerism, the Council of Trent and early Baroque visual and architectural forms (later 16th century) will lead to the second focus on 17th century visual and spatial practices in Counter-Reformation Rome and beyond.
AHVC-210
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Ancient to Baroque Art History
AHVC-211
Credit Hours:
4
History of Photography
An introduction to the history of photography from its inception in 1839 to the present day. The class focuses specifically on the multivalent functions of photography in society globally, the theoretical and conceptual bases of its production, consumption and on the critical analysis of photography as a field of art production.
AHVC-212
Credit Hours:
4
American Art
An introduction to American Art and Visual Culture of the American colonies and the United States from the Early-Colonial Period to the beginning of World War II. The class focuses specifically on how Art, Popular Culture and Mass Culture function in the visual culture of the United States until 1939.
AHVC-220
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Modern Art History
AHVC-222
Credit Hours:
4
Representing Africa on Film
An examination of ethnographic/documentary film dealing with Africa as well as contemporary cinema produced by African filmmakers. This class accords particular attention to the perspectives of African filmmakers as agents in the representation of cultures, social realities and histories in Africa.
AHVC-223
Credit Hours:
4
Arts of Oceania
An examination of the diverse arts and cultures of the South Pacific. This course focuses on objects, concepts and practices from Polynesia, Melanesia, Micronesia and Australia as well as the portrayal and interpretation of arts from this geographical region in other areas of the world.
AHVC-225
Credit Hours:
4
Arts of Post-Colonial Africa
This course examines selected issues and debates related to the production, interpretation and collection of visual arts in post-colonial Africa. By way of a series of case studies, we will consider both the individual voices of artists and perspectives from art world information brokers.
AHVC-230
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in African Art History
AHVC-231
Credit Hours:
4
Art of Japan
An introduction to Japanese architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts from prehistoric times to the 20th century, with an emphasis on the works in their cultural and religious context.
AHVC-232
Credit Hours:
4
Art of China
This course is an introduction to Chinese visual culture from prehistoric times through the Mao era. Organized around a selection of key objects and images, this course explores a variety of art forms from China through diverse contexts such as ritual, gender, imperial patronage, literati ideals, and political icons.
AHVC-240
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Art History and Visual Culture
AHVC-262
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Art History and Museum Studies
AHVC-263
Credit Hours:
4
World Views: Spatial Imagination in East Asia
This course engages the question: 'How are images used to imagine our place in the world?' Students are invited to study fascinating practices of spatial image-making in East Asia from the inside out, by exploring these world-views from the perspective of their makers. You will be asked to pay special attention to how social and economic power structures inflect these representations: to envision and decode spatial imagery as a site of imagination, control and resistance. Artists and patrons in China, Japan, and Korea have for centuries produced elaborate maps and landscape imagery, photographs and film to imagine the world in a variety of ways. This course invites you to approach modern and contemporary representations of space in East Asia both in theoretically and historically informed ways. In the first part of the course, students build a frame of reference for their analysis of post-war case studies, by reading core texts in spatial theory, and exploring important visual representations of space from pre-modern East Asia. In the second part of the course, students apply these theoretical and historical approaches to select cases that exemplify more recent struggles over space and its imagination in East Asia.
AHVC-281
Credit Hours:
4
19th Century Art History and Visual Culture
This class explores the nature, character, implications and power of the avant -garde and academic art theory and practice in art societies. It analyzes the many layers of political, cultural and social meanings of art in the nineteenth century, as well as its artistic meanings, purposes, effects and agendas. Some topics to be examined include the neoclassical, the romantic, the ideal, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism.
AHVC-299
Credit Hours:
1-4
Intermediate Topics in Art
AHVC-302
Credit Hours:
4
Medieval Art and Architecture
This course is an advanced investigation of art and architectural developments in the Latin West and Byzantine East during the medieval period. Selective foci include western monastic art, building, and lay patronage in Spain, France, and Burgundy during the Romanesque and early Gothic periods, as well as eastern monasticism in Constantinople, Greece, and Asia Minor in the Middle Byzantine period. Issues unique to each cultural sphere will be considered, such as feudalism in the West, and the icon and the role of the Imperial family and Constantinopolitan aristocracy in the East.
AHVC-313
Credit Hours:
4
New Art (Late 20th/21st Century)
This advanced-level class examines Art and Visual Culture since 1980, mostly in the western world, but increasingly globally after 2000. The class explores the intellectually complex, multivalent and frequently socially and politically engaged art of today, focusing on its conceptual platforms, agendas, meanings, purposes, and effects. The course examines an increasingly pluralistic and global art world through the lenses of both Art History and Visual Culture, and it explores the museum as a contested site.
AHVC-324
Credit Hours:
4
Visual Life in African Cities
An advanced level course. Cities in Africa, like their counterparts elsewhere in the world, are intensely -- perhaps even unrelentingly - artistic environments. In Dakar as in Nairobi, in Johannesburg as in Lagos, the urban terrain's unparalleled resources enable myriad artistic phenomena including paintings and sculptures, modernist architecture and public monuments, sartorial expression, as well as print and electronic media such as cartoons, advertisements, video, television, the internet, and popular music. In this seminar style course, students will investigate the artistic propositions and creative resources constituting the urban environment in Africa by way of a series of case studies.
AHVC-333
Credit Hours:
4
Art and Revolution in 20th Century China
This advanced-level course examines the complicated relationship between art and politics in China through key debates and developments in Chinese visual culture during the 20th century. The class explores competing narratives that negotiate the tensions between "tradition and modernity," "East and West," "local and global" and their implications for revolutions in art. Particular attention will be paid to interrogating the ideological underpinnings of artistic mediums and formats, the historiographical stakes of modernity, and the assertion of cultural memory in art and text.
AHVC-361
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
For the student of marked creative ability who wishes to pursue advanced subjects not otherwise listed, such as design, drawing, graphics, ceramics or history and criticism.
AHVC-362
Credit Hours:
1-4
Directed Study
For the student of marked creative ability who wishes to pursue advanced subjects not otherwise listed, such as design, drawing, graphics, ceramics or history and criticism,
AHVC-363
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
AHVC-364
Credit Hours:
1-4
Independent Study
AHVC-380
Credit Hours:
4
Methods of Art History and Visual Culture
This class is required for Art History and Visual Culture majors. This class is the first of the three-part capstone experience for the Art History and Visual Culture major. It introduces students to the theoretical and methodological platforms of Art History and Visual Culture and examines the historical development of the fields of both Art History and Visual Culture. It introduces students to the methods and theoretical approaches of practicing scholars in the field and asks students to formulate their own platforms, which they will translate into active research in the second and third capstone courses (ARTH 408 and 409).
AHVC-399
Credit Hours:
1-4
Advanced Topics in Art
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
AHVC-408
Credit Hours:
4
Art History and Visual Culture Senior Seminar: Research
In this required course, senior majors will research and prepare the senior thesis.
AHVC-409
Credit Hours:
1
Art History and Visual Culture Senior Seminar: Writing
In this required course, senior majors will present their senior thesis during our annual senior symposium.
AHVC-451
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research
AHVC-452
Credit Hours:
4
Senior Research

Art Studio

ARTS-101
Credit Hours:
4
Studio Art Foundation
Directed at both majors and non-art majors, Studio Art Foundation (SAF) is a basic introduction to artistic practice in contemporary culture. Through an interdisciplinary approach and a technical understanding of multiple mediums, the course crosses borders between two-dimensional, three-dimensional and time based artistic disciplines. Campus wide events (lectures, concerts, exhibitions) are used as points of departure in the class to emphasize the critical nature of art making with other content areas of study, theory and research.
ARTS-110
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Drawing
A studio course in the fundamentals of drawing in several media. Problems in still life, rendering, and perspective will be covered, along with historical and contemporary approaches to drawing.
ARTS-115
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Painting
Historical and contemporary approaches to painting technique will be covered in readings and discussions and by working with painting materials.
ARTS-117
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Photography
An Introductory course concentrating on: the fundamentals of operating a digital single lens reflex camera (SLR), editing software -- Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop, and output to large format printers. Technical understanding of camera and editing software, lectures on historical context and contemporary practice, as well as readings serve to encourage students to explore photography as a way to look, question and record personal experience through the medium of photography.
ARTS-121
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Ceramics
A broad introduction to all ceramics potential. Clay working in sculptural as well as vessel-oriented directions. Slide presentations and discussions with references made to ceramic history as well as to contemporary ceramic art. Students are introduced to a variety of hand building techniques and are encouraged to pursue their individual creative potential.
ARTS-122
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Ceramics - The Wheel
An introduction to producing Ceramic forms, both utilitarian and sculptural, using the potter's wheel. Image presentations and discussions will introduce students to the contemporary and historical role of ceramics in art and material culture. Students are introduced to a variety of throwing techniques and surface treatments and are encouraged to pursue their individual creative potential.
ARTS-131
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Printmaking
As a foundation course, emphasis will be on historical and contemporary concepts in art through the media of printmaking. The course will provide exposure to printmaking processes with direct involvement in one of the following: intaglio, screen printing and relief. Tools, materials and techniques will be fully covered regarding the featured printmaking process. Art issues such as format and content of visual images will be stressed as well as technical procedures for implementing the print.
ARTS-141
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Sculpture
This course is an introductory course into sculpture. It will concentrate on developing sculptural thinking and working habits, the safe use of basic tools, understanding ways of seeing and the translation of experience into an arts practice.
ARTS-165
Credit Hours:
4
Special Topics in Studio Art
Special topic courses with a focus on particular aspects of studio art at the introductory level.
ARTS-170
Credit Hours:
4
Introduction to Drawing for Majors
A studio course in the fundamentals of drawing in several media. Problems in still life, rendering, and perspective will be covered, along with historical and contemporary approaches to drawing.
ARTS-199
Credit Hours:
1-4
Introductory Topics in Art
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
ARTS-210
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Drawing
Continued experience in drawing with emphasis on contemporary techniques. Prime objective is increased capacity for responsive seeing and a deeper understanding of drawing as a total medium. Prerequisite: ARTS 110 or consent.
ARTS-211
Credit Hours:
4
Life Drawing
Study from the human figure in charcoal and other media with emphasis on structure in line, value and color. Prerequisite: ARTS 110 or consent.
ARTS-212
Credit Hours:
4
Life Drawing
Study from the human figure in charcoal and other media with emphasis on structure in line, value and color. Prerequisite: ARTS 110 or consent.
ARTS-213
Credit Hours:
4
Queer Graphix
Through a series of drawing and printmaking projects, this studio art course seeks to explore and creatively express queer culture, aesthetics and GLBT art history, as well as notions of identity, gender, orientation and sexuality. Art students will employ traditions of journalistic comics, collage, screen-printing, photo-copies, community collaborative artistic work (zines) and research presentation projects to not only celebrate queer artistic practices but also reveal the often damaging impact society and politics has on self-identity and expression.
ARTS-215
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Painting
Continued painting experience with emphasis on developing individual concepts. Prerequisite: ARTS 115 or consent.
ARTS-217
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Photography
A continuation of ARTS 117, Intermediate Photography is taught in a rotational manner, in order to give students a wide variety of depth of exploration in materials and skills in Alchemy and Darkroom Practice, Studio Lighting, Lightroom and Photoshop Manipulation and Output, Still Life as Form and Content, and Fashion Photography 1950's - 80's.
ARTS-220
Credit Hours:
4
Ceramic History and Contemporary Practice
The history of ceramics very closely parallels the development of civilization and culture across the planet. In this studio course, students will draw upon this long, rich history as inspiration for their own work and gain a deeper understanding of the context in which they and other contemporary artists are creating ceramic art. The primary emphasis of ceramic history and its impact on contemporary practice will be explored through image presentations, research, discussions and studio work. Students will use a variety of construction techniques and surface treatments to transform their ideas and research into objects and are encouraged to pursue their individual creative potential. No prerequisites.
ARTS-221
Credit Hours:
4
Intermediate Ceramics
Students will hone the skills gained in previous ceramic courses and will focus on refining the application of learned techniques to produce visually and conceptually compelling work. Image presentations and discussions will lead to a deeper understanding of contemporary and historical ceramic art. Students will gain experience in different firing technologies and clay and glaze chemistry. Primary emphasis is on students' individual conceptual and technical development. Prerequisite: ARTS 121, ARTS 122 or Ceramic Multiples.