Faculty & Staff

Charlotte Karem Albrecht Albrecht, Charlotte Karem Karem Albrecht

Charlotte Karem Albrecht
Faculty  |  Women’s Studies
Consortium for Faculty Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow
Blair Knapp Hall
205C
740-587-6297
Degree(s): 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota B.A., Rice University
Biography: 

I have taught courses on transnational sexualities, Asian American women, Asian American history, women of color politics in response to 9/11, and women in the arts. At Denison, I teach the introductory class “Issues in Feminism” and a class called “Gender and Sexuality in American Orientalism” (Spring 2014). I currently serve as a board member of the Arab American arts organization, Mizna. In my free time I enjoy gardening, cooking, and creative writing. I am originally from Louisville, Kentucky.

Research: 

My current research traces the anxieties surrounding Arab American migrant peddlers and their economic networks at the turn of the twentieth century and argues that this profession, which employed large number of men and women, constituted Arab immigrants as racial and sexual ‘others.’ My research shows that the transience of male Syrian peddlers and the gender and sexual transgressions of female Syrian peddlers posed a threat to claims of Syrian whiteness. Using theoretical frameworks from women of color feminist theory, post-colonial history, queer theory, and cultural studies, I read for both the presences and absences of the Syrian peddler in archives of popular culture, social welfare, and the early Arab American community. 

I am also beginning a project that puts Arab American studies in conversation with studies of U.S. settler colonialism. Thus far, I am examining how Syrian migrant peddlers in the late 19th century were facilitators of settler colonialism in newly-acquired Native lands.

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Robin Bartlett Bartlett, Robin Bartlett

Bartlett, Robin Bartlett
Faculty  |  Queer Studies, Women’s Studies, Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Professor
Higley Hall
204
740-587-6574
Service: 
1973-Present
2012
Degree(s): 
B.A., Western College; M.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Intermediate Macroeconomics, Women in Labor Force, Forensic Economics, Introduction to Queer Studies

Research Interests: Executive Compensation, Earnings Differentials, Pedagogy, Clubs

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Robin Chapdelaine Chapdelaine, Robin Chapdelaine

Robin Chapdelaine
Faculty  |  Women’s Studies, International Studies
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
Degree(s): 
B.A., Santa Clara University; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University
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Tabitha Chester Chester, Tabitha Chester

Tabitha Chester
Faculty  |  Black Studies, Women’s Studies
Visiting Assistant Professor
740-587-6594
Degree(s): 
B.A. Florida State University; M.A., Temple University; Ph.D., Arizona State University
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Susan E. Diduk dr. Diduk, Susan E. E. Diduk

Faculty  |  Black Studies, International Studies, Women’s Studies, Sociology / Anthropology
Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
101A
740-587-6301
Service: 
1984-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., University College London, U.K.; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University
Biography: 

"My areas of specialization in anthropology include classical and contemporary theory, art and society, gender, political economy and Sub-Saharan Africa. My doctoral dissertation was an historical examination of gender among the Kedjom of the Republic of Cameroon, between female economic contributions and cultural ideologies which demeaned them. More recently, I have done research on the history of European alcohol in West Africa and the impact of transnational brewing corporations on the national and local economies of Cameroon. I am particularly interested in the relationship between rural communities and the African State. Presently, I am exploring indigenous knowledge around agricultural production and the religious significance of twinship in Sub-Saharan Africa."

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Melissa Feldner Feldner, Melissa L. Feldner

Staff  |  Women’s Studies
Academic Administrative Assistant, Laura C. Harris Symposium Coordinator
Blair Knapp Hall
210
740-587-6297
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Barbara Fultner dr. Fultner, Barbara Fultner

Barbara Fultner
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Queer Studies, Women’s Studies, Neuroscience
Professor & Chair (Women's Studies)
Blair Knapp Hall
210A
740-587-6330
Service: 
1995-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Simon Fraser University; M.A., McGill University; Ph.D., Northwestern University
Biography: 

Barbara Fultner, Professor of Philosophy and Women's Studies, joined the faculty at Denison in 1995. She earned a B.A. from Simon Fraser University, an M.A. from McGill University and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University. She teaches courses in philosophy of language, the history of modern philosophy, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of feminism among others. She served as chair of the department from 2004-2008 and is currently the Director of the Women’s Studies Program.

Dr. Fultner was the recipient of a 2008-2009 University of Connecticut Humanities Institute Fellowship, as well as Denison University's R.C. Good Fellowship for 2008-2009.  In 2000, she received Denison's Feminist Teaching Award. Most recently, she has been awarded a “New Directions Initiative” grant by the GLCA to pursue yoga teacher training as part of her research on embodiment, practice, and intersubjectivity. 
Research: 
Dr. Fultner's research interests lie at the cross-roads of analytic and continental philosophy, with a focus on theories of meaning and social practice. She is interested in the nature of normativity and its relationship to the social aspects of language. In her recent work, she has been examining the connections between semantic normativity and the development of intersubjectivity in early childhood as well as the relationship between convention and creativity in dialogue. She also has strong interests in feminist philosophy. Her articles have appeared in journals including Philosophical Studies, Philosophy and Social Criticism, and The International Journal of Philosophical Studies and in several edited collections. She is translator of Jürgen Habermas Truth and Justification (MIT Press 2003) and his On the Pragmatics of Social Interaction (MIT Press 2000). She is the editor of Habermas: Key Concepts (Acumen 2011).
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Jill Gillespie dr. Gillespie, Jill Grace Gillespie

Faculty  |  Women’s Studies
Visiting Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
210B
740-587-6559
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
A.B., Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University
Biography: 

Jill Gillespie came to Denison in 2003.  At Denison, she has taught courses on German literature and cultural studies, feminism, fairy tales, gender, and the human/animal connection. She earned her A.B. in Humanities from Stanford University and did graduate work in Germanic Studies at Cornell University. Her dissertation addressed the gendering of World War II in recent German films. Current research areas include the cultural representations of animal/human relationships, the political uses of satire, and sexual violence.

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Karen Graves Graves, Karen L. Graves

Karen Graves
Faculty  |  Queer Studies, Women’s Studies, Education
Professor & Chair (Education)
Blair Knapp Hall
107B
740-587-6680
Service: 
1993-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Biography: 

Karen Graves (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, B.S. 1981, M.Ed. 1988, Ph.D. 1993) is Professor and Chair in the Department of Education at Denison University. She began her career as a mathematics teacher at Effingham (IL) High School. Professor Graves teaches courses in history and philosophy of education, queer studies, and educational policy. Her research addresses twentieth-century schooling in the United States with a focus on gender and sexuality, and legal policies concerning education. Her most recent book, And They Were Wonderful Teachers: Florida’s Purge of Gay and Lesbian Teachers, was awarded a 2010 Critics Choice Book Award from the American Educational Studies Association. Other publications include Girls' Schooling during the Progressive Era: From Female Scholar to Domesticated Citizen (Garland, 1998) and the co-edited volume, Inexcusable Omissions: Clarence Karier and the Critical Tradition in History of Education Scholarship (Peter Lang Publishing, 2001), with Timothy Glander and Christine Shea.

Professor Graves is a Past President of the History of Education Society and a former Vice-President in the American Educational Research Association, Division F: History and Historiography. She was honored to hold the Charles and Nancy Brickman Distinguished Service Chair at Denison from 2010 to 2013. In 2013 Graves was recognized as a recipient of the Education Alumni Association Distinguished Alumni Award at the University of Illinois.

Karen Graves is a lifelong St. Louis Cardinals fan with collegial respect for Cubs fans.

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Amanda M. Gunn Gunn, Amanda Meris M. Gunn

Amanda M. Gunn
Faculty  |  Communication, Environmental Studies, Queer Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
308
740-587-6396
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Appalachian State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Biography: 

Amanda Gunn focuses her teaching and scholarship on the development of relationships and communities through engaged communication. Specifically, she explores questions of marginality, voice, and empowerment in a variety of communication context including interpersonal, small group, and organizational. She completed her BS at Appalachian State University, her MA and PhD at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

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Clare C. Jen Jen, Clare C. C. Jen

Clare C. Jen
Faculty  |  Women’s Studies, Biology
Assistant Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
319
740-587-8596
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Duke University; Ph.D., University of Maryland College Park
Research: 

Specifically, my interest is in the discursive production of "public health anxieties" and the ways systems of race, nation, and gender frame "risky bodies" and "at-risk bodies." In analyzing the 2002-03 multi-country outbreak of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), I trace a genealogy of SARS scientific progress at primarily cellular and genetic levels which serves as a backdrop for political, regulatory, and popular science discourses. In addition, I am currently interested in "nail salons" as discursively produced sites of "public health anxiety," fear, and contagion.

Broadly, my area of scholarship aims to make connections across terrains of “natures” and “cultures.” Much of the public perceives the biological sciences as wholly residing in the natural world. In other words, the scientific study of the living natural world operates with an objectivity that produces value-free knowledge that is untouched by “culture,” that is without historical, political and economic contexts; scientific knowledge is an unblemished reflection of the natural world. On the hand, there is an analogous and equally troublesome misconception of “women’s studies” as wholly residing in culture, that is operating within a social constructionism that problematically annihilates subjects, objects, and “facts.” While neither of these caricatures does justice to these (inter)disciplines’ intents, they allow us to trace needed connections between feminist critiques and biological inquiries. Feminist science studies aims to examine and embrace dimensions of reality between the social and the material.

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Dima Kaedbey Kaedbey, Dima Kaedbey

Faculty  |  Women’s Studies
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
Service: 
2014-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., M.A., American University of Beirut, Lebanon; Ph.D., The Ohio State University
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Toni King King, Toni C. King

Toni King
Faculty  |  Black Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor
Doane Administration
201
740-587-8660
Service: 
1997-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Oklahoma State University; M.A., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University
Biography: 

Human Subjects Review (Denison University Institutional Review Board)

* Diversity Advisory Committee

Posse Liaison to the National Posse Foundation

Faculty Diversity (Recruitment, Hiring, Program Development)

Workshops and Trainings

Personnel Committee

Academic Awards Convocation

Commencement Committee

Working with faculty groups pertaining to diversity ( FOCIF: Faculty of Color/International Faculty Group,
the Black Caucus, Faculty Development Committee, Faculty Orientation Committee, Queer Studies Concentration.)

* The Diversity Advisory Committee Members are: Dosinda Alvite, Warren Hauk, Ching-Chu Hu, John Jackson, Toni King, Christine Pae

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Maia Kotrosits Kotrosits, Maia Kotrosits

Maia Kotrosits
Faculty  |  Religion, Queer Studies, Women’s Studies
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
310B
740-587-6303
Service: 
2014-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Binghamton University; M.Div., M.Phil., Ph.D., Union Theological Seminary
Biography: 

Maia Kotrosits' research finds points of contact between ancient Christian/diaspora Jewish literature and contemporary cultural studies, queer and feminist theories. Surfacing themes of violence, belonging, and collective experiences of pain and loss, she finds connections and disjoints between the ancient world and some worlds of the present. She has co-written books on the ancient Coptic poem The Thunder: Perfect Mind, as well as on the Gospel of Mark. Her forthcoming book, Rethinking Early Christian Identity: Affect, Violence, and Belonging (Fortress Press, 2015) is a re-examination of the centrality of the designation "Christian" in the doing of what is called early Christian history, and a set of proposals for how to understand some New Testament and affiliated literature without it.

Dr. Kotrosits edits the Bible and Cultural Studies series with Palgrave Macmillan.

Research: 

Monographs:

Rethinking Early Christian Identity: Affect, Violence, and Belonging. Fortress Press (forthcoming in Spring 2015).

Re-Reading the Gospel of Mark Amidst Pain and Trauma (co-authored with Hal Taussig). Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

The Thunder: Perfect Mind: A New Translation and Introduction (co-authored with Hal Taussig, Jared Calaway, Justin Lasser and Celene Lillie). Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

Articles/Essays:

“Seeing is Feeling: Revelation’s Enthroned Lamb and Ancient Visual Affects,” Biblical Interpretation (forthcoming, 2014).

“The Queer Life of Christian Exceptionalism,” Culture and Religion 15.2 (June 2014): 156-185.

“Institutional Brokenness and Other Quandaries of Feminist Belonging,” Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion 29.2 (Fall 2013).

"The Ekklesia and the Politics of the Meal: Re-thinking 'Christian Identity' in and through Acts," in Mahl und religiöse Identität im frühen Christentum eds. Matthias Klinghardtand Hal Taussig, 241-278. Tanz Verlag (2012).

"Romance and Danger at Nag Hammadi" The Bible and Critical Theory 8.1 (March 2012): 39-52.

"The Rhetoric of Intimate Spaces: Affect and Performance in the Corinthian Correspondence" Union Seminary Quarterly Review Vol. 62, no. 3-4: 134-151.

"The Thunder: Perfect Mind and Early Christian Conflicts About Gender" The Fourth R Vol. 24, no.1. (January/February 2011): 7-12.

"Re-reading Canonical Identity: A Sexual Ethics of Bible Interpretation" Studies in Gender and Sexuality vol. 11, issue 2 (April 2010): 89-100.

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Linda Krumholz dr. Krumholz, Linda J. Krumholz

Linda Krumholz
Faculty  |  English, Black Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor & Chair (Black Studies)
Barney-Davis Hall
207
740-587-5740
Service: 
1992-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Reed College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison
Biography: 

Linda Krumholz is Associate Professor of English and Director of Black Studies. She teaches Twentieth and Twenty-first Century African American, Native American, and Ethnic American literature as well as literary theory and composition. She currently holds the Lorena Woodrow Burke Chair of English.

Krumholz is interested in the ways fiction can transform social representations and beliefs about race, history, economics, power, and cultural identities. Her research focuses on novels by contemporary African American and Native American authors such as Toni Morrison, Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise Erdrich, and Paule Marshall. In her recent work, she also considers how teaching can transform U.S. discourses and contemporary conversations about race. Her essays have appeared in Ariel, Contemporary Literature, African American Review, Modern Fiction Studies, and various anthologies.

Courses Taught:

FYS 101: Autobiography and Identity; FYS 101: Contemporary Identities: Autobiography and Comics (with Ron Abram); FYS 101: Toni Morrison’s Novels
HONORS 167: Twentieth-Century Literary and Performing Arts: Roots in Blues and Jazz (with April Berry)
ENGLISH 202: Introduction to Literary Studies: Literary Theory and Critical Methods
ENGLISH/WOMEN’S STUDIES/QUEER STUDIES 225: Women in Literature
ENGLISH 237: Introduction to Creative Writing
ENGLISH/BLACK STUDIES 255: Ethnic Literature
BLACK STUDIES 235: Introduction to Black Studies
ENGLISH/BLACK STUDIES/WOMEN’S STUDIES 325: African American Women’s Novels
ENGLISH 326: Contemporary Native American Literature
ENGLISH/BLACK STUDIES 355: The Harlem Renaissance
ENGLISH/BLACK STUDIES 356: Narratives of Slavery
ENGLISH 400: Toni Morrison and Black Feminist Theory; ENGLISH 400: Literary Criticism; ENGLISH 400: Race and the American Literary Imagination; ENGLISH 400: From Theory to Fiction: Literary Theory and the Novels of Louise Erdrich and Toni Morrison; ENGLISH 400: Rewriting America: Race, Gender, History, and Power in Toni Morrison’s Novels

Positions Held:

Director of Black Studies (2013-present)
Lorena Woodrow Burke Chair of English (2010-2015)
Co-Chair of the Homestead Advisory Board (2013-present)
Chair of Homestead Advisory Board (2000-2005, 2008-2013)
Chair of the Faculty (2011-2012)
Chair of English (2007-2010)
Co-Chair of MLK Day of Learning Committee (2002-2004)

Research: 

Selected Publications:

  • From Mysteries to Manidoos: Language and Transformation in Louise Erdrich’s The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse.” Western American Literature, forthcoming.
  • Blackness and Art in Toni Morrison’s Tar Baby.” Contemporary Literature 49.2 (Summer 2008): 262-291.
  • Tar is Art: Blackness and the Power of Fiction in Tar Baby.” The Fiction of Toni Morrison: Teaching and Writing on Race, Identity, and Culture. Ed. Jami L. Carlacio. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 2007. 77-84.
  • Reading and Insight in Toni Morrison’s Paradise.” African American Review 36 (2002): 21-34.
  • Native Designs: Silko’s Storyteller and the Reader’s Initiation.” Leslie Marmon Silko: A Collection of Critical Essays. Ed. Louise K. Barnett and James L. Thorson. Albuquerque NM: U of NM Press, 1999. 63-86.
  • Reading in the Dark: Knowledge and Vision in Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon.” Approaches to Teaching the Novels of Toni Morrison. Ed. Nellie Y. McKay and Kathryn Earle. New York: MLA, 1997. 106-112.
  • ‘To Understand This World Differently’: Reading and Subversion in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Storyteller.” Critical Visions: Contemporary North American Native Writing. Ed. Jeanne Perreault and Joseph Bruchac. Ariel 25 (1994): 89-113.
  • Dead Teachers: Rituals of Manhood and Rituals of Reading in Song of Solomon.” Toni Morrison. Ed. Nancy J. Peterson. Modern Fiction Studies 39 (1993): 551-574.
  • The Ghosts of Slavery: Historical Recovery in Toni Morrison’s Beloved.” African American Review 26 (1992): 395-408.
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Sara Lee Lee, Sara Lee

Sara Lee
Faculty, Staff  |  Women’s Studies, Athletic Training, Physical Education, Big Red Athletics
Professor, Associate Director of Athletics, Head Women's Basketball Coach
Mitchell Recreation and Athletics Center
228
740-587-6290
Service: 
1989-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Moorhead State University; M.A., Kent State University
Biography: 

Sara Lee has been at Denison University as a head coach since 1989. During her time she has served as both head women’s basketball coach and head volleyball coach. She is currently the head women’s basketball coach and Associate Director of Athletics.

Lee is Denison’s all-time wins leader in both volleyball and women’s basketball.  She is a multiple time winner of the North Coast Athletic Conference Coach of the Year award and her teams have been recognized on a national level on many occasions. In 2011, the Big Red completed the conference's first undefeated regular season (25-0) and went on to capture the 2011 NCAC Tournament for the sixth time out of the last seven seasons.  On Jan. 13, 2010 Lee recorded victory No. 300 of her career against Oberlin College.

In 1989 Lee came to Denison from Lake Erie College in Painesville, Ohio, where she was the head coach of women's volleyball, basketball and softball for two years. While at Lake Erie, she also served as the coordinator of women's athletics, an instructor of physical education, a residence hall director and an academic advisor.

A native of Moorhead, Minn., Lee enrolled at Moorhead State University after graduating from high school in 1982. She earned her B.S. in physical education from Moorhead State in 1986. Lee went on to earn an M.A. in athletic administration from Kent State in 1987. In 1995 Lee was inducted into the Moorhead State University Athletic Hall of Fame for her distinguished accomplishments and career both on and off the playing field.

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Diana Mafe Mafe, Diana A. Mafe

Diana Mafe
Faculty  |  English, Black Studies, International Studies, Women’s Studies
Assistant Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
306
740-587-6237
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., McMaster University; M.A., University of Guelph; Ph.D., McMaster University
Biography: 

Diana Adesola Mafe teaches postcolonial literatures with an emphasis on contemporary Anglophone African literatures. She also teaches African American literatures and courses in Women’s Studies. Her work tracks the literary and cinematic roles of and for women of color in African and American discourses. She has published articles in Research in African Literatures, American Drama, English Academy Review, Frontiers, Safundi, Camera Obscura, and African Women Writing Resistance. Her book, Mixed Race Stereotypes in South African and American Literature: Coloring Outside the (Black and White) Lines (Palgrave Macmillan 2013), examines the literary stereotype of the “tragic mulatto” from a transnational perspective.

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Gill Wright Miller ’74 Miller, Gill Wright Wright Miller ’74

Gill Wright Miller '74
Faculty  |  Dance, Environmental Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor & Chair (Dance)
Doane Dance Building
102
740-587-6766
1977
1981
Service: 
1976-1977, 1981-Present
Degree(s): 
B.F.A., Denison University; M.A., Wesleyan University; Ph.D., New York University
Biography: 

Dr. Gill Wright Miller, Associate Professor of Dance and Women's Studies, has been at Denison full-time since 1981. Dr. Miller earned her PhD from New York University in Dance and Women's Studies, her MA from Wesleyan University in Movement Studies, and her BFA in Performance from Denison University.

Dr. Miller's written research concerns public constructions of the pregnant body, healing from a developmental movement base, and body politics in general. She is highly involved in the world of experiential anatomy, most specifically Body-Mind Centering. She has received several grants for her work, including a major grant from the University of Minnesota, in “Embodied Research.” She accepted the coveted Arnold Professorship at Whitman College in Washington for Spring 2009. Her most recent book, Exploring Body-Mind Centering: An Anthology in Experience and Method, was published in 2011, and she is the author of many essays, including the 2011 publications of “Women in Dance” in The Encyclopedia of Women in Today's World and “Creativity and Mothering” in The Encyclopedia of Motherhood.” This past year, Dr. Miller published a chapter called “The Transmission of African-American Concert and American Jazz Dance” in Jazz Dance: Roots and Branches (Oliver and Guarino, 2013.) She is also compiling an anthology on African dance. Dr. Miller is currently working on an essay on research and methodology in dance studies and a second book on Somatics and the Body Movement in the United States, tentatively titled Pedagogies of the Body.

Dr. Miller teaches coursework in somatics, movement analysis, and cultural studies. Besides teaching somatics (including work from Ideokinesis, Bartenieff Fundamentals and Basic Neurocellular Patterns from Body-Mind Centering) and movement analysis (including reconstructing sections of works by Humphrey, Weidman, Limon, Cunningham, and others) every year, her recent courses include topics in dance's cultural studies, such “Modernism ReComposed,” “Postmodernism in Dance,” and “African-American Concert Dance,” and “The Body in Performance.”

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Gabi Mkhize Mkhize, Gabi Mkhize

Faculty  |  Women’s Studies
Visiting Assistant Professor (part-time)
Blair Knapp Hall
205B
740-587-6297
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Isis Nusair Nusair, Isis Nusair

Faculty  |  International Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor & Chair (International Studies)
Blair Knapp Hall
210C
740-587-8537
Service: 
2005-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Tel-Aviv University; M.A., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Clark University
Biography: 

Isis Nusair, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and International Studies at Denison University. She has earned a Bachelor’s degree in Social Work from Tel-Aviv University, a Master’s degree in International Peace Studies from the University of Notre Dame, and a doctorate in Women’s and Gender Studies from Clark University. She teaches courses on transnational feminism; gendered migration, feminism in the Middle East and North Africa; and gender, war and conflict.

Isis previously served as a researcher on women’s human rights in the Middle East and North Africa at Human Rights Watch and at the Euro-Mediterranean Human Rights Network. She is currently working on two book projects. The first focuses on the impact of war and displacement on Iraqi women refugees in Jordan and the USA, and the other on gendering the narratives of four generations of Palestinian women in Israel from 1948 until the present. She is the co-editor with Rhoda Kanaaneh of Displaced at Home: Ethnicity and Gender among Palestinians in Israel. She is a contributor to the Encyclopedia of Women and Islamic Cultures and the Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa. She serves on the editorial committee of the Middle East Report and is a member of Jadaliyya’s DARS team.

Research: 

Publications:

  • “Negotiating Identity, Space and Place among Iraqi Women Refugees in Jordan.” Doing Research in Conflict Zones: Experiences from the Field. Eds. Dyan Mazurana, Karen Jacobsen, and Lacey A. Gale.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013: 56-77.
  • The Cultural Costs of the 2003 US-led Invasion of Iraq: A Conversation with Art Historian Nada Shabout.” Feminist Studies, 39 (1), 2013: 119-148. full text
  • Permanent Transients: Iraqi Women Refugees in Jordan.” Middle East Report 266, 2013: 20-25. full text
  • “Gendering the Narratives of Three Generations of Palestinian Women in Israel.”  Displaced at Home: Ethnicity and Gender among Palestinians in Israel. Eds. Rhoda Kanaaneh and Isis Nusair. New York: SUNY Press, 2010. 75-92. full text [pdf]
  • “Introduction” (with Rhoda Kanaaneh)  Displaced at Home: Ethnicity and Gender among Palestinians in Israel. Eds. Rhoda Kanaaneh and Isis Nusair. New York: SUNY Press, 2010. 1-18. full text [pdf]
  • Gender Mainstreaming and Feminist Organizing in the Middle East and North Africa.” Women and war in the Middle East. Eds. Nadje Al-Ali and Nicola Pratt. London: Zed Books, 2009. 131-157. full text [pdf]
  • Gendered, Racialized and Sexualized Torture at Abu-Ghraib.” Feminism and War: Confronting U.S. Imperialism. Eds. Robin Riley, Chandra Mohanty, Minnie Bruce Pratt. London: Zed Books, 2008.  179-193. full text [pdf]
  • “The Integration of the Human Rights of Women from the Middle East and North Africa in the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership” (with Rabea Naciri). Denmark: Euro-Mediterranean Human Rights Network, 2003.
  • Gendered Politics of Location: Generational Intersections.” Women and the Politics of Military Confrontation: Palestinian and Israeli Gendered Narratives of Dislocation. Eds. Nahla Abdo and Ronit Lentin. London: Berghahn Books, 2002. 89-99. full text [pdf]
  • Women and Militarization in Israel: Forgotten Letters in the Midst of Conflict.” Frontline Feminisms: Women, War, and Resistance. Eds. Marguerite Waller and Jennifer Rycenga. London: Routledge, 2001. 113-128. full text [pdf]

Commentary: 

Talking to the Media about Veiling in the Middle East


By: Isis Nusair, Associate Professor of International Studies &  Women’s Studies, Denison University



At a time when Arabs and Muslims are becoming the ultimate “enemy others,” how are we to talk about Islam and particularly Muslim women to the media? What happens if our quotes are misrepresented or taken out of context, and what if they are used to reinforce the same biases we aim to counter? How are we to deal with online media when racist websites can, with a click of a mouse, draw on our “quotes” to reinforce their own hateful agendas? It is part of our role as academics and educators to engage in public discourse. Yet, is talking to the media becoming too risky? 



I have had unfortunate reason to consider these questions. I was contacted early in the fall semester of 2009 by Theodore May, an American journalist who writes for the Global Post, about veiling in Egypt. In the past, I have usually avoided talking about these issues to the media because of its historic sensationalist representations of Arab and Muslim women. However, May asked intelligent questions and seemed serious about studying 
the subject from all its angles. I suggested the names of people he could contact and naively expected him to share the final draft of his article with me. I emphasized during our phone conversation that writing about the veil is very complex and laden with colonial, Orientalist, and stereotypical representations of both Islam and Arabs. I also said that Muslim women veil for a variety of reasons. These could be religious as well as economic or to protect themselves from sexual harassment in the public sphere. When talking about economic reasons, I emphasized the issue of class and how some young women cannot afford designer clothes when attending college. Therefore, wearing the veil could also be about income levels in addition to a variety of other factors.



The resultant story had little to do with the words I provided to the writer. The only quote attributed to me in May's article, published online in the Global Post on September 14, 2009, (“Some Women Find  Egypt a Colder Place”) was: ” 'Some women can’t afford 2 million dresses,' said Isis Nusair, a professor of women’s studies at Denison University in Ohio, 'and wearing the hijab is cheap.'

“

Not only is May’s quote sensationalist, selective, and misrepresentative of what I said and the nuances in which I presented my argument, it also is now featured on the Islamophobic website “Bare Naked Islam - It isn’t Islamophobia when they really are trying to kill you.

“

In my attempt to contact the Post and complain about the quote attributed to me, I received the following response from the editor, Barbara Martinez: “What Theo did was not cherry-picking, but choosing the most interesting and lively quote for an 800-word overview of the topic, the only thing Dr. Nusair said that he hadn't heard from other sources. Had she not said anything original, he would not have quoted her at all. The story itself puts the quote into context and presents the veil issue as complex.” The editor's implication was that I should feel grateful to have been quoted. “Grateful” hardly describes my reaction.



I am hesitant to conclude that the right solution is to avoid talking to the media. There is abundant misinformation in my field of study, concerning women in the Middle East and North Africa, and I'm sure the same is true for those who concentrate on areas all across the academic curriculum. I'd like to think that if we, as academics, spoke out more frequently in public arenas on issues of importance, then perhaps the charade of misinformation could be lifted. But how are we to feel comfortable speaking out when digital proliferation practically guarantees that an irresponsible use of our words will live forever online and might even be used to bolster ignorance? Is there a tyranny of silence brought about by the threat of misrepresented ideas? How many dedicated scholars refuse to share their expertise in the public media because it's just not worth it? These are the questions that I’ll be thinking about next time the phone rings and it's a reporter calling.

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Keun-Joo Christine Pae dr. Pae, Christine K. Pae

Keun-Joo Christine Pae
Faculty  |  Religion, Queer Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
310D
740-587-5619
Service: 
2008-Present
Degree(s): 
B.Ed., Seoul National University of Education, Seoul; M.Th., Yonsei University, Seoul; M.Div., Yale University, M.Phil, Ph.D., Union Theological Seminary in NYC
Biography: 

Dr. K. Christine Pae joined the faculty at the Department of Religion in Fall 2008. Since then, she has taught religious ethics, Christian social ethics, and transnational feminist ethics for both the Department of Religion and the Women’s Studies Program. As a Christian feminist ethicist, Christine’s academic interests include feminist peacemaking and interfaith spiritual activism, transnationalized militarism with focus on intersection between gender and race, transnational feminist ethics, and Asian/Asian-American perspectives on post-colonial racial relations. Currently Christine is working on her manuscript, Sex and War: A Christian Feminist Ethic of War and Peace. She has published and presented several essays concerning war, women, Asian American Christianity, and religious ethics. As a co-convener, she serves the Asian American Ethics Working Group at the Society of Christian Ethics (2011-2013).

Research: 

Publications

  • Minjung Theology and Transnational Militarism.”  Ahn Byung-Mu and Minjung (eds.), Theology in the 21st Century.  Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers, 2012. (Forthcoming)
  • “Asian Ethics.”  Edited by Miguel De La Torre (ed.), Ethics: A Liberative Approach.  Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Fortress, 2012 (Forthcoming).
  • “Will to Power, Divided Self: Valerie Saiving and Reinhold Niebuhr on Sin.” Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, 2012 (Forthcoming).
  • “Making an Asian American Christian Public Ethic: Unavoidable Burden of Race.” Journal of Society of Christian Ethics, Spring 2012 (Forthcoming).
  • “Korean American Churches’ Negotiating Spaces in Flushing, the Queens of New York City.”  Nadia Mian, Richard Cimino, and Wei-Shan Huang (eds.),  Religions and New York City: An Ecological Frame.  Bloomington:  Indiana University Press, 2011 (Forthcoming).
  • “A Solidary-Talk among Women of Color: Creating the “We” Category.” Keeping the Light: Faith, Feminism, and Scholarship.  Kate Ott and Melanie Harris (eds.). New York: Palgrave McMillan, 2011.
  • “Feminist Theo-Ethical Reflection on War: In Remembrance of ‘Comfort Women.’”  Yale University Divinity School. Reflections.
  • “Western Princesses—a Missing Story:   in the Borderlands: A Christian Feminist Ethical Analysis of U.S. Military Prostitution in South Korea.”  Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 29, no.2 (2009), 121-39.
  • “Negotiated or Negotiating Spaces: Korean Churches in Flushing, Queens of New York City.” Cross Currents: Religious Communities and Global Cities 58, no. 4 (2008), 456-74.
  • “We Are Asian and Asian-American Women—Generation X: A Post- Colonial Feminist Liturgy in North America.” New and Borrowed Rites: Liturgy 23,no. 1(2007).
  • “Allergy: Killing the Other vs. God: Liberating the Other—A Theological Reflection toward Liberation of the Korean Military Wives” Doing Theology from Korean Women’s Perspectives: Ewha Journal of Feminist Theology 4 (2006).

Community Service

  • 2011-Present: Convener, Asian and Asian American Working Group, Society of Christian Ethics
  • 2009-Present: Denison University Diversity Advisory Committee
  • Hosted a teaching workshop for the junior faculty of color.  
  • 2009-Present: Denison Museum Board
  • 2008-Present: Women’s Studies Committee, and Queer Studies Committee, Denison University
  • Hosted two campus-wide public events on religion and sexuality.
  • 2009: Women of Color Leadership Project National Women’s Studies Association
  • 2009-2010: Program Committee, Peace for Life: World without Empire International Conference in New York City 
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Frank (Trey) Proctor dr. Proctor, Frank Proctor

Frank (Trey) Proctor
Faculty  |  History, Black Studies, Environmental Studies, Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor & Chair (History), Director of (Latin American & Caribbean Studies)
Fellows Hall
404
740-587-5791
Service: 
2005-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of California, Davis; M.A., University of Arizona; Ph.D., Emory University
Biography: 

Frank “Trey” Proctor teaches courses in the history of Latin America and the Atlantic World. His research and teaching interests focus on Mexico, colonial Latin America, and Comparative Slavery.

Proctor’s research focuses on the lived experience of slaves of African descent and master-slave relations in Spanish America.  His first book, “Damned Notions of Liberty”: Slavery, Culture, and Power in Colonial Mexico, 1640-1769 (University of New Mexico Press, 2010) explores those issues in Mexico.  His next book project will explore similar questions from the perspective of the Spanish Empire in an attempt to move away from “national” histories.  His work has appeared in the Hispanic American Historical Review and The Americas and he has contributed chapters to the edited volumes Black Mexico (University of New Mexico, 2009) and Africans to Spanish America (University of Illinois Press, forthcoming).

In 2005, Proctor joined the Denison faculty after teaching at Whitman College in Walla Walla, WA for two years. Professor Proctor earned his BA from University of California at Davis, his MA from the University of Arizona, and his PhD from Emory University.

 

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Dave Przybyla Przybyla, David Paul J. Przybyla

Faculty  |  Organizational Studies, Women’s Studies, Psychology
Associate Professor & Director of (Organizational Studies)
Burton D. Morgan Center
406; Blair Knapp Hall 404
740-587-6308
Service: 
1985-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., SUNY; M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., SUNY-Albany
Biography: 

Dr. Przybyla is a social-personality psychologist specializing in the study of human sexual behavior.  His research interests in this area include interpersonal attraction, the consequences of physical attractiveness, and contraceptive education.  Dr. Przybyla has been at Denison since 1985, and teaches a range of courses including social psychology, human sexuality, and industrial/organizational psychology. Dr. Przybyla also is the Director of Denison's Organizational Studies Program.

Research: 

My major research program is in morphological characteristics and their consequences in the area of interpersonal attraction.  Broadly speaking, morphological characteristics may be conceptualized as physical attractiveness cues -- facial and otherwise.  A current primary focus of my work is cranial hair loss in men.  I am interested in continuing my work in this area and would be particularly interested in working with students who have expertise with Photoshop.  Research projects into other physical attractiveness cues are also of interest.

A second area of interest is that of gender and sexuality.  I am interested in comparing the experiences of men and women in areas ranging from contraception and abortion, to pregnancy and childbirth, to erotica and coercion, to sexual dysfunction. I would be interested in research extending either of the preceding content areas into the field of organizational behavior (e.g., romantic attraction in the workplace).

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Sandy Runzo dr. Runzo, Sandra R. Runzo

Sandy Runzo
Faculty  |  English, Queer Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor & Chair (English), Director of (Queer Studies)
Barney-Davis Hall
203
740-587-6494
Service: 
1986-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., West Virginia University; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University
Biography: 

Sandy Runzo has been teaching at Denison since 1986.  With a Ph.D. from Indiana University, Bloomington, she teaches courses in American literature and culture, women writers, and modern and contemporary poetry and fiction. She has published essays on American women poets in American Literature, ESQ: Journal of the American Renaissance, The Emily Dickinson Journal, Genders, and Women’s Studies, and is working on a study of Emily Dickinson and 19th-century American popular culture.  She has been a member of the editorial collective of the journal Feminist Teacher since 1984.  She served as Department Chair from 2002 to 2007. 

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Megan Threlkeld dr. Threlkeld, Megan S. Threlkeld

Megan Threlkeld
Faculty  |  History, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor
Fellows Hall
403
740-587-6326
Service: 
2008-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Lawrence University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa
Biography: 
Megan Threlkeld joined the faculty at Denison in the fall of 2008. She regularly teaches courses on the U.S. since the Civil War, U.S. women’s history, and U.S. foreign relations. Her other teaching interests include legal history, progressivism, manifest destiny and U.S. expansion, and international feminism.
 
Her research focuses on U.S. women’s international activism in the first half of the twentieth century. Her book, Promoting Pan America: U.S. Women Internationalists Confront Revolutionary Mexico, is forthcoming from the University of Pennsylvania Press.
 
Dr. Threlkeld earned her M.A. and Ph.D. at the University of Iowa, and her B.A. at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin.
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