Faculty & Staff

Dosinda Alvite Alvite, Dosinda Alvite

Dosinda Alvite
Faculty  |  Modern Languages, Spanish, Latin American & Caribbean Studies
Associate Professor
Fellows Hall
301J
740-587-8502
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Universidad de Santiago de Compostela; M.A., Eastern Michigan University; Ph.D., University of Michigan
Biography: 

When I reflect on what I enjoy most about teaching my answer comes immediately: I am in the business of thinking. I view teaching as a multidirectional learning process especially successful at the liberal arts college, where we connect all fields of knowledge to establish intellectual foundations for life-long learning. Teaching at Denison University has given me a renewed desire to learn as I feel inspired by my colleagues’ examples and the students’ demands for excellence.

There are three goals that animate my teaching: I put students at the center of the learning process, I help them develop their self-awareness and intrinsic motivation (which I think are indispensable for life-long learning), and I provide collaborative learning environments as I see them critical to educating responsible citizens.
Specific themes that I incorporate into my classes are:

  • Critical thought, active intellectual and social engagement, collaborative learning.
  • Global and local identities: migration movements, nationalism.
  • Gender identity. Representation and power of religious groups. Ethnic/race identification.
  • Service learning pedagogy.

My teaching at Denison University is enhanced by my specialization in contemporary literatures and cultures of Spain. These are some topics I examine in my research, and that we analyze in most of my classes:

  • 20th Century Peninsular literature, especially novel, with a cultural studies approach.
  • Spanish peninsular film and women studies.
  • Literature and cultures of Equatorial Guinea.
  • Africa-Spain and Trans-Atlantic connections in history of thought.
  • Sefarad.
  • Service learning philosophies.
      
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Monica Ayala-Martinez dr. Ayala-Martinez, Monica M. Ayala-Martinez

Monica Ayala-Martinez
Faculty  |  Modern Languages, Portuguese, Spanish, Environmental Studies, Latin American & Caribbean Studies
Associate Professor
Fellows Hall
301K
740-587-6228
Service: 
1997-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University Pontificia Bolivariana; B.A., University de Antioquia; M.A., West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Miami
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Liz Barringer-Smith Barringer-Smith, Elizabeth A. Barringer-Smith

Barringer-Smith, Elizabeth A. Barringer-Smith
Staff  |  Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Modern Languages, Portuguese, Spanish
Academic Administrative Assistant
Fellows Hall
301A
740-587-6643
Degree(s): 
B.S., Ohio University
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Jason Busic Busic, Jason Busic

Busic, Jason Busic
Faculty  |  Modern Languages, Spanish
Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
301N
740-587-6464
Service: 
2012-Present
Degree(s): 
M.A., Ohio University; Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Jason Busic studies medieval and early modern Iberia with a focus on cultural studies. His principal area of investigation focuses on intellectual and ideological engagement between Christians and Muslims. Professor Busic especially enjoys exploring themes of identity and culture in class with his students and the connections between the pre-modern and contemporary worlds.

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Fran Lopez-Martin dr. Lopez-Martin, Francisco J. Lopez-Martin

Dr.Lopez-Martin, Francisco J. Lopez-Martin
Faculty  |  Modern Languages, Spanish, Latin American & Caribbean Studies
Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
301S
740-587-6463
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Universidad de Huelva; M.A., University of Western Ontario; Ph.D., Duke University
Biography: 

Francisco Javier L„pez-MartÍn teaches Spanish literature and language, critical theory and writing at Denison University. His specialty area is 16th and 17th Hispanic Transatlantic Literature and History with emphasis in the representation of time, space and the dynamics of power between America and Spain. He is also interested in European Humanism during the 16th century and in Spanish Golden Age Theatre.

He teaches middle and upper level classes of Hispanic literature, with a Transatlantic approach, focusing on representation, aesthetics and critical thinking. He also teaches upper level courses on Transatlantic Studies, exposing the struggles of power during American Conquest and analyzing the complexity of the encounter between Europeans and Americans in the 16th century. In addition to these courses, Francisco teaches language courses and a writing workshop in Spanish.

Francisco has recently published –Violencia, neoplatonismo y aristotelismo en La Aurora en Copacabana” and –Complejidad e hipertextualidad en el teatro barroco: Calder„n y sor Juana”. His book entitled Representaciones del tiempo y construcci„n de la identidad entre Espa_a y Am_rica (1580-1700) will be published by Universidad de Huelva in September, 2011.

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Iliana Rosales-Figueroa Rosales-Figueroa, Iliana Rosales-Figueroa

Faculty  |  Spanish
Visiting Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
310X
740-587-5520
Degree(s): 
B.A., Universidad Veracruzana, México; M.A., University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati
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Charles Édouard St-Georges St-Georges, Charles Édouard St-Georges

Charles Édouard St-Georges
Faculty  |  Modern Languages, Spanish
Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
740-587-8503
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Brigham Young University; M.A., Arizona State University; Ph.D., Arizona State University
Biography: 

Charles St-Georges is a native of rural southern Arizona. He grew up doing theatre (participating in more than 40 plays) and began his academic career studying theatre before his intellectual curiosity led him to languages and cultures. During his undergraduate studies, he completed a major in Spanish and a minor in Russian, after which he found work as an interpreter in various fields including healthcare, law enforcement, and insurance.

Charles then went on to pursue two masters degrees: one in Spanish language and culture, and one in French linguistics. He taught grammar and literature courses at Arizona State University while completing his Ph.D. in Spanish cultural studies, for which he successfully defended a dissertation that analyzed the temporal trope of the ghost and the rhetorical figure of the family in horror films from Mexico, Spain, and Argentina.

Research: 

Charles is currently the Production Editor for the academic journal Chasqui: revista de literatura latinoamericana. His research mainly focuses on the intersections between normative discourse and representations of time in (usually filmic) narratives from the Hispanic world. He is particularly concerned with the relationship between Western historicism, the supposedly apolitical realm of chronological time, and the persistent use of ghosts and specters to represent historical injustice in Latin American and Peninsular film.

Book Chapters

  • “Zombies as Temporal Critique: Sudor frío (2010) and Generations of Youth in Post-Dictatorship Argentina.” Zombies in the Hispanic World. Ed. Mónica Ayala-Martínez. Accepted chapter.
  • “The Literalization of Trauma’s Specter and the Problematization of Time in The Appeared (Aparecidos).” Ghostly Hauntings and the Talking Dead in Contemporary Latin American and Iberian Narratives. Ed. Amanda Peterson and Alberto Ribas. Book proposal under review.
  • “The Modernized Myth and Mythical Modernity: Kilómetro 31 as Bourgeois Horror.” Mexican Horror Films: Studies in the Horror Film. Ed. Gerardo Cummings. Accepted chapter.

Articles

  • “El espectro de la realidad en dos novelas de Manuel Mujica Láinez.” Confluencia 29.2 (2014): 116-28.
  • “Cosas de mujeres: La demarcación de lo líquido como espacio femenino en Kilómetro 31.Polifonía 2 (2012): 57–67. Print.
  • “La dualidad y la (in)mortalidad: las dimensiones fantasmales de Santuarios del corazón.” Puentes 8 (2010): 91–99. Print.
  • “Reflexiones sobre la (in)dependencia puertorriqueña: intelectualismo vs. sabiduría colectiva en La guaracha del Macho Camacho.” Arenas Blancas 11 (2010): 7–11. Print.

Reviews

  • Rev. of Subero, Gustavo. Queer Masculinities in Contemporary Latin American Cinema: Male Bodies and Narrative Representations. Imagofagia 10 (2014): Forthcoming.
  • Rev. of Vázquez, David J. Triangulations: Narrative Strategies for Navigating Latino Identity. Chasqui 41.2 (2012): 255-57. Print.
  • Rev. of Podalsky, Laura. The Politics of Affect and Emotion in Contemporary Latin American Cinema: Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Mexico. Imagofagia 6 (2012): n. pag. Web.
  • Rev. of Elsaesser, Thomas and Malte Hagener. Film theory: an introduction through the senses. Imagofagia 4 (2011): n. pag. Web.
  • Rev. of Kilómetro 31. Chasqui 38.2 (2009): 236–38. Print.

Conference Proceedings

  • “La interrogación infantil del orden simbólico en El orfanato.” Actas del II Congreso Internacional de la Asociación Argentina de Estudios de Cine y Audiovisual. Buenos Aires, 2010. Web.
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Beth Tatko Tatko, Elizabeth Ann Tatko

Faculty  |  Modern Languages, Spanish
Visiting Instructor
Fellows Hall
301H
740-587-6593
Degree(s): 
B.A., M.A., Ohio University
Biography: 

My interests include second language acquisition, language pedagogy, and instructional materials development. I teach Spanish 111, 112, and 211.

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