Erin Henshaw

Erin Henshaw

Dr. Erin J. Henshaw and Megan Greenhouse (’11) presented a poster titled “Effect of Message Framing on Views of Postpartum Depression” at the annual meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association in Chicago, IL.

The focus of their study was on how using a loss-framed message about post-partum depression increased the perceived need for treatment but also increased negative opinions about a woman suffering from depression. Dr. Henshaw also sponsored two poster presentations made by students during the Psi Chi session at the annual meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association in Chicago, IL. Melanie Warning (’11) presented her senior research titled “The Relationship Between Body Dissatisfaction, Relationship Dissatisfaction, Self-Silencing, and Depressive Symptoms in Perinatal Women” and Bethany Sabourin (‘11) presented her senior research titled “Current Status of the “Psychology-Religion Gap”: Christian Religiosity and Mental Healthcare Treatment Seeking Behaviors and Attitudes”. Dr. Henshaw then traveled across the Atlantic Ocean in order to deliver a paper, co-authored by Dr. Heather O'Mahen (The University of Exeter in the United Kingdom), at the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies. The paper, titled "Messages about Postpartum Depression: Intended and Unintended Effects of Psychoeducational Materials”, discussed an extension of Dr. Henshaw’s work on message framing to include a sample of British mothers. Dr. Henshaw had her paper “Patient Preferences for Clinician Interactional Style in Treatment of Perinatal Depression” published in Qualitative Health Research this summer. The paper was the result of collaboration with several co-authors from the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, and the University of Exeter in the U.K.. Dr. Henshaw also was second author on a paper published in The Journal of Affective Disorders this summer. The paper titled “Stigma and depression during pregnancy: does race matter?” examined how stigma associated with depression affected a mother’s decision to seek treatment and how that relationship varied between Black Women and White Women.

  • 11Erin Henshaw