Faculty & Staff

Sam Cowling Cowling, Sam Cowling

Sam Cowling
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
205D
740-587-5636
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A. University of Victoria (2004), M.A. University of Manitoba (2005), Ph.D. University of Massachusetts, Amherst (2011)
Biography: 

Sam Cowling joined the Philosophy Department at Denison University in 2013. He received his B.A. from the University of Victoria (2004), his M.A. from the University of Manitoba (2005), and his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst (2011). Prior to moving to Denison, Dr. Cowling was Visiting Assistant Professor at Western Michigan University.

Dr. Cowling's research focuses on metaphysics, philosophy of science, and philosophy of language. He has published articles in Analysis, Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Erkenntnis, Philosophical Studies, Philosophical Quarterly, and Synthese. His current projects include papers on the metaphysics of time, modality, causation, and ontology as well as a book on abstract entities like numbers, possibilities, and properties. In addition to his areas of research, Dr. Cowling has taught courses on American Philosophy, Biomedical Ethics, Environmental Ethics, Nietzsche, and the History of Analytic Philosophy.

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Barbara Fultner dr. Fultner, Barbara Fultner

Barbara Fultner
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Queer Studies, Women’s Studies, Neuroscience
Professor & Chair (Women's Studies)
Blair Knapp Hall
210A
740-587-6330
Service: 
1995-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Simon Fraser University; M.A., McGill University; Ph.D., Northwestern University
Biography: 

Barbara Fultner, Professor of Philosophy and Women's Studies, joined the faculty at Denison in 1995. She earned a B.A. from Simon Fraser University, an M.A. from McGill University and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University. She teaches courses in philosophy of language, the history of modern philosophy, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of feminism among others. She served as chair of the department from 2004-2008 and is currently the Director of the Women’s Studies Program.

Dr. Fultner was the recipient of a 2008-2009 University of Connecticut Humanities Institute Fellowship, as well as Denison University's R.C. Good Fellowship for 2008-2009.  In 2000, she received Denison's Feminist Teaching Award. Most recently, she has been awarded a “New Directions Initiative” grant by the GLCA to pursue yoga teacher training as part of her research on embodiment, practice, and intersubjectivity. 
Research: 
Dr. Fultner's research interests lie at the cross-roads of analytic and continental philosophy, with a focus on theories of meaning and social practice. She is interested in the nature of normativity and its relationship to the social aspects of language. In her recent work, she has been examining the connections between semantic normativity and the development of intersubjectivity in early childhood as well as the relationship between convention and creativity in dialogue. She also has strong interests in feminist philosophy. Her articles have appeared in journals including Philosophical Studies, Philosophy and Social Criticism, and The International Journal of Philosophical Studies and in several edited collections. She is translator of Jürgen Habermas Truth and Justification (MIT Press 2003) and his On the Pragmatics of Social Interaction (MIT Press 2000). She is the editor of Habermas: Key Concepts (Acumen 2011).
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Christa Johnson Johnson, Christa Johnson

Christa Johnson
Faculty  |  Philosophy
Visiting Instructor
Blair Knapp Hall
205B
740-587-6430
Degree(s): 
B.A., Ursinus College; Ph.D. candidate The Ohio State University
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Tony J. Lisska Lisska, Anthony J. J. Lisska

Tony J. Lisska
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Maria Theresa Barney Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
205E
740-587-5616
Service: 
1969-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Providence College; M.A., St. Stephen's College; Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

I was educated at Providence College, graduating in 1963 with an AB degree (Cum Laude) in Philosophy. I continued my work in Philosophy, receiving my MA from St. Stephen’s College and my Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. In addition, I have a Certificate from the Institute for Educational Management at Harvard University. I presently hold an endowed professorship in the Department on Philosophy, and earlier I was awarded the Charles and Nancy Brickman Distinguished Service Chair.

My most important graduate school mentor—although we didn’t use that term in the late 1960s—was Robert G. Turnbull, Chair of the Department of Philosophy at Ohio State and himself a most distinguished scholar/teacher. It was Bob Turnbull who forced me to re-think the scholastic philosophy from my earlier academic work with the insights and rigor of contemporary analytic philosophy. That combination indeed made my scholarly life. I have published nearly sixty philosophical articles, essays in books, and book reviews in The American Journal of Jurisprudence, Teaching Philosophy, The Thomist, New Blackfriars (Oxford), The Heythrop Journal (London), International Philosophical Quarterly, Cross Currents, Speculum, Philosophy in Review and The Psychological Record. I have also read philosophy papers, nearly ninety in all, at all three divisional meetings of the American Philosophical Association, several regional Philosophy associations, and Institutes for Medieval Philosophy, among other conferences. My scholarly work has been directed towards the texts of Thomas Aquinas, the great thirteenth century Aristotelian. Recent work centered on constructing an analytic explicatio textus of Aquinas’s work on ethical naturalism, which culminated in Aquinas Theory of Natural Law: An Analytic Reconstruction; this book appeared in 1996 from the Clarendon Press of Oxford University Press. A paperback edition was published in 1997 and reprinted in 2001. A more recent book-length manuscript has focused on Aquinas’s account of perception in his philosophy of mind and how this contrasts radically from the Cartesian model so prevalent in Modern Philosophy. Recent lectures were given at Northwestern University, Iona College, The University of Notre Dame, The University of North Florida, Kenyon College, Marquette University, Villanova University, Oklahoma State University, Luther College, The University of Scranton, the national meetings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association and the Central and Pacific Divisions of the American Philosophical Association, The International Thomas Aquinas Society, the Thomas More Society, and the Smithsonian Institute. I gave the 2002 Aquinas Lecture at Providence College on recent scholarly work on the philosophy of Thomas Aquinas, the 2004 Suarez Lecture at Fordham University on “recta ratio” in Aquinas and Ockham, presented the 2006 Aquinas Lecture on Aquinas and Natural Law at St. Thomas University in New Brunswick and gave the Larwill Lecture at Kenyon College in 2013 on Natural Law Issues in Classical and Contemporary philosophy. An essay on natural law appeared in Contemporary Legal Problems: 1998 (OUP) and another in Virtue’s End: God in the Moral Philosophy of Aristotle and Aquinas (St. Augustine Press, 2008). Two chapters, one on Aquinas and natural law and the other on later medieval philosophy of law, recently appeared in an international series on jurisprudence: Volume Six of A Treatise of Legal Philosophy and General Jurisprudence: A History of the Philosophy of Law from the Ancient Greeks to the Scholastics (Springer, 2007). A chapter on Aquinas’s Theory of Mind appeared in a monograph entitled Analytical Thomism (Ashgate: 2006). In 2006, I served as the elected national President of the American Catholic Philosophical Association; I delivered the presidential address at the annual meetings held in Granville on issues in inner sense in Aquinas.

Teaching at an undergraduate college like Denison was always an aspiration. Working with students and helping them become connected with philosophy is an activity I treasure immensely. In my early teaching days, I was concerned that materials in philosophy either talked down to beginning students or were too difficult for them. With this problem in mind, I wrote Philosophy Matters (Charles Merrill: 1978), which combined what I took to be the best of an anthology and the best of an analytic commentary. This book went through five printings and has been re-printed privately for the 2013-14 academic year. In 1990, I received the Sears Teaching Award at Denison and in 1994 received the Carnegie Foundation United States Baccalaureate Colleges Professor of the Year Award. My listing appears in the Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in the Mid-west, and Who’s Who in American Education.

My intellectual avocation is regional history. I served on the Board of Management of the Granville Historical Society for fifteen years; there another member and I began a quarterly, The Historical Times, which in 1991 won a state historical award. I still serve as an editor of this quarterly. I have published over forty articles on local history, the most widely read treating an early 19th century Roman Catholic Bishop who worked with Native Americans appeared in Oxford’s New Blackfriars (1993). In addition, I have given over thirty presentations on topics in regional history. In 1985, I published A History of Aquinas College High School and am presently completing A Short History of East Columbus, Ohio. I am the author of An Illustrated History of the Buckeye Lake Yacht Club, which was published in 2007. I am an editor of Volume One of the 2005 Bicentennial History of Granville, which appeared in late 2004. This book contains a chapter that I co-authored; Volume Two contains two of my historical essays. This three-volume set recently received a national award from the National Association of State and Local Historians.

I served Denison University as Dean of the College for a five-year period, chaired the Philosophy Department twice—and once again for 2008-2009—and served as the founding Director of the Honors Program for fifteen years. I have been an evaluator for curriculum projects on four occasions for The National Endowment for the Humanities and have served as an external consultant for Honors Program development and philosophy department evaluation. I am a founding member of the National Association of Fellowship Advisors. Recent Honors Program narratives have been presented to the American Council of Academic Deans and at the National Meetings of the National Collegiate Honors Council. I was the central author for Denison’s North Central accreditation project in 1980. In 2004 and again in 2008, I served as President of The Granville Foundation.

Curriculum Vitae: 
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Jonathan Maskit dr. Maskit, Jonathan Maskit

Jonathan Maskit
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Assistant Professor & Chair (Philosophy, Politics & Economics)
Blair Knapp Hall
205K
740-587-5641
2001
2002
Service: 
1997-2001, 2002-Present
Degree(s): 
A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University
Biography: 

Assistant Professor Jonathan Maskit joined the faculty at Denison in 1996. He earned an A.B. from Vassar College and an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University.

Jonathan Maskit teaches courses in aesthetics, continental philosophy, environmental philosophy, the history of philosophy, and others. His research focuses on the relationship between culture, nature, and art drawing particularly on the work of Kant, Heidegger, and Deleuze and Guattari. He is currently working on a book on this theme and has published articles and reviews in Research in Philosophy and Technology, Philosophy & Geography, Ethics, and Canadian Philosophical Reviews. He has also contributed to a number of edited volumes and has seen some of his work anthologized. He has been a visiting scholar at the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium) and the University of Potsdam (Germany) and has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, The Belgian-American Educational Foundation, and The Global Partners Project. He serves as the Reviews Editor for Ethics, Place, & Environment.

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John McHugh dr. McHugh, John W. McHugh

John McHugh
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Visiting Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
201l
740-587-5897
Service: 
2011-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Providence College; Ph.D., Boston University
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Mark Moller Moller, Mark Moller

Moller, Mark Moller
Staff, Senior Administration  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, First-Year Program
Dean First Year Students, Associate Professor
Higley Hall
119
740-587-6668
Service: 
1996-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Bucknell University; M.A., Ph.D., Washington University, St. Louis
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Kate Tull Tull, Katherine Tull

Tull, Katherine Tull
Staff  |  Philosophy
Academic Administrative Assistant
740-587-6387
Degree(s): 
B.A., Marymount Manhattan College; M.F.A. University of Iowa
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Steve Vogel Vogel, Steven Vogel

Steve Vogel
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Brickman - Shannon Professor & Chair (Philosophy)
740-587-6579
Service: 
1984-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ph.D., Boston University
Biography: 

Steve Vogel, who holds an A.B. from Yale University and a Ph.D. from Boston University, has been a member of the Philosophy Department at Denison since 1984. He teaches courses in continental philosophy, nineteenth-century philosophy, environmental ethics, social and political philosophy, and logic. He has special research interests in environmental philosophy, in the work of Jürgen Habermas and of the Frankfurt School, and in Marxism, Hegel, and Heidegger. He is the author of Against Nature: The Concept of Nature in Critical Theory, published in 1996 by SUNY Press, and has published articles in Environmental Ethics, Environmental Values, Philosophy Today, Rethinking Marxism, Social Theory and Practice, Tikkun, Dissent, and elsewhere. In 2003 he was awarded the Charles A. Brickman Award for Teaching Excellence at Denison.

Interview with C.S. Soong on KPFA's Against the Grain, 3/13/13

Curriculum Vitae: 
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