Faculty & Staff

Robin Bartlett Bartlett, Robin Bartlett

Bartlett, Robin Bartlett
Faculty  |  Queer Studies, Women’s Studies, Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Professor
Higley Hall
204
740-587-6574
Service: 
1973-Present
2012
Degree(s): 
B.A., Western College; M.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Intermediate Macroeconomics, Women in Labor Force, Forensic Economics, Introduction to Queer Studies

Research Interests: Executive Compensation, Earnings Differentials, Pedagogy, Clubs

Show Profile

Jessica S. Bean dr. Bean, Jessica S. S. Bean

Jessica S. Bean
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Assistant Professor
Higley Hall
225
740-587-5617
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Middlebury College; M. Phil., Oxford University; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to Macroeconomics, Econometrics, Evolution of the Western Economy.

I have also taught courses in gender and economics, the evolution of social policy, and the Great Depression and 20th century economic history.

Research: 

My research is mainly focused on labor markets and female labor supply in early-twentieth-century Britain, with a particular interest in poverty and the household dynamics of labor supply. I have published one article exploring the origins and impact of early minimum-wage legislation in Britain, and another on the determinants of female labor supply in interwar London. My current works in progress include examinations of the work and wages of female home workers around the turn of the 20th century, household labor supply in interwar London, and the labor market impact of transportation and commuting patterns in 1930s London. Most recently, I have begun a new research project exploring female labor during and after the First World War in Britain.

Selected publications:

“The Trade Boards Act of 1909 and the Alleviation of Household Poverty” (with George Boyer), British Journal of Industrial Relations, vol. 47, 2 (June 2009).

“’To help keep the home going’: Female Labor Supply in Interwar London” forthcoming, Economic History Review (2014).

Show Profile

Sohrab Behdad dr. Behdad, Sohrab Behdad

Dr.Behdad, Sohrab Behdad
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Economics
Professor
Higley Hall
206
740-587-6404
Service: 
1985-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to Microeconomics, Introduction to Microeconomics, History of Economic Thought, International Finance

Research Interests: International finance and trade, history of economic thought, Middle Eastern economies

Research: 

International finance and trade, history of economic thought, Middle Eastern economies

Show Profile

David Boyd dr. Boyd, David W. Boyd

Dr.Boyd, David W. Boyd
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
229
740-587-6317
Service: 
1991-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Intermediate Microeconomics, Industrial Organization, Mathematical Economics

Research: 

Research Interests: Applied Microeconomics

Show Profile

Laura Boyd dr. Boyd, Laura A. Boyd

Dr.Boyd, Laura A. Boyd
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
203
740-587-6316
Service: 
1991-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Carleton College; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to & Intermediate Microeconomics, Econometrics, Labor Economics, Applied Econometrics

Research Interests: Economics of education, earnings equations, economics of sports

Show Profile

Michael C. Brady dr. Brady, Michael C. C. Brady

Michael C. Brady
Faculty  |  Political Science, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Lugar Program in Politics and Public Service
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
305D
740-587-6502
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University
Biography: 

Michael joined the political science department at Denison in the fall of 2009.  His dissertation focuses on the role of parties and partisanship in conference committee negotiations between the House and Senate.  More broadly, his research and teaching centers around the study of political institutions, campaigns and elections, and political parties in the United States.  

Show Profile

Ted A. Burczak dr. Burczak, Theodore A. A. Burczak

Ted A. Burczak
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Professor
Higley Hall
207
740-587-6747
1997
1998
Service: 
1995-1997, 1998-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., SUNY at Binghamton; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to Macroeconomics, Economic Justice, Intermediate Macroeconomics, Monetary Theory, History of Economic Thought II

Curriculum Vitae: 
Show Profile

Sam Cowling Cowling, Sam Cowling

Sam Cowling
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
205D
740-587-5636
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A. University of Victoria (2004), M.A. University of Manitoba (2005), Ph.D. University of Massachusetts, Amherst (2011)
Biography: 

Sam Cowling joined the Philosophy Department at Denison University in 2013. He received his B.A. from the University of Victoria (2004), his M.A. from the University of Manitoba (2005), and his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst (2011). Prior to moving to Denison, Dr. Cowling was Visiting Assistant Professor at Western Michigan University.

Dr. Cowling's research focuses on metaphysics, philosophy of science, and philosophy of language. He has published articles in Analysis, Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Erkenntnis, Philosophical Studies, Philosophical Quarterly, and Synthese. His current projects include papers on the metaphysics of time, modality, causation, and ontology as well as a book on abstract entities like numbers, possibilities, and properties. In addition to his areas of research, Dr. Cowling has taught courses on American Philosophy, Biomedical Ethics, Environmental Ethics, Nietzsche, and the History of Analytic Philosophy.

Show Profile

Katy Crossley-Frolick Crossley-Frolick, Katy Crossley-Frolick

Katy Crossley-Frolick
Faculty  |  Political Science, International Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Lugar Program in Politics and Public Service
Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
305F
740-587-5684
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., North Central College; M.A., Ph.D., Loyola University
Biography: 

I joined the faculty at Denison in 2007 holding a doctorate in political science from Loyola University Chicago. My current research interests focus on post-conflict peacebuilding and statebuilding, transitional justice, international organizations, human rights, and German foreign and security policy. I serve as the faculty advisor to several student organizations, including the Denison Democrats, Denison’s Model United Nations Club and Denison University’s UNICEF Chapter.

Courses


  • Comparing Democratic States and Societies (POSC 120)

  • Introduction to International Politics (POSC 122)

  • Selected Topics in International Politics (POSC 141)
  • Transitions to Democracy (POSC 330)
  • The United Nations and World Problems (POSC 344)

  • Human Rights in Global Perspective (POSC 345)

  • European Union (POSC 346)

  • Foreign and Security Policy in Western Europe (POSC 348)

  • The Iraq War (POSC 402)


Every other fall I supervise the preparation of students to participate in the American Model United Nations (AMUN) simulation. Attendance at this simulation is part of my course, POSC 344, the United Nations and World Problems. The simulation gives students the opportunity to apply what they learn in the course over several days. Over the past few years Denison students have represented Lithuania, Zimbabwe, Malaysia, Serbia, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Spain, Tunisia, and Colombia. Students have won numerous awards at the conference recognizing their excellence in representing these various countries. Over 1500 university students from the U.S and abroad attended the AMUN conference, representing approximately 100 UN Member States.

I have also supervised several senior and summer research projects, including: 

"The Czech Presidency of the European Union and the Lisbon Treaty: Critical Junctures and the Challenge of Leadership," Michelle Tverdosi ’10; "Recognition as Intervention in Civil Conflict: The Case Studies of Kosovo and East Timor," Leslie Marshall ’10; “The Responsibility to Protect and US Foreign Policy Decision-Making,” Evan Johnson ’11; “The Role of Artists in Political Change in Northern Ireland During the Troubles,” Erin Saul ’11; “Processes of Democratization, Peacebuilding, and Transitional Justice in Guatemala,” Sydni Franks ’13 [in collaboration with Dr. Gladys Mitchell-Walthour], “Breaking Borders: Computer Mediated Communication and Transnational Activism” Brenda Falkenstein ‘14.

Curriculum Vitae: 
Show Profile

Sue Davis dr. Davis, Sue F. Davis

Sue Davis
Faculty  |  Political Science, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Lugar Program in Politics and Public Service
Associate Professor & Chair (Political Science)
Blair Knapp Hall
306
740-587-6500
Service: 
2002-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., M.A., University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Ph.D., Emory University
Show Profile

Paul A. Djupe dr. Djupe, Paul Aaron A. Djupe

Paul A. Djupe
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Lugar Program in Politics and Public Service, Political Science
Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
305B
740-587-6310
Service: 
1999-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.A., Ph.D., Washington University, St. Louis
Curriculum Vitae: 
Show Profile

Quentin M. Duroy dr. Duroy, Quentin M. Duroy

Quentin M. Duroy
Faculty  |  Economics, Environmental Studies, International Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
202
740-587-6314
Service: 
2004-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., M.S., University of Rennes; M.A., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to & Intermediate Macroeconomics, Introductory Microeconomics, Economic Development, Economic Growth & Environmental Sustainability

Research Interests: Culture, Development, and Economic Growth; the Determinants of Environmental Sustainability; Evolutionary Economics

Research: 

Research Interests: Culture, Development, and Economic Growth; the Determinants of Environmental Sustainability; Evolutionary Economics

Show Profile

Barbara Fultner dr. Fultner, Barbara Fultner

Barbara Fultner
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Queer Studies, Women’s Studies, Neuroscience
Professor & Chair (Women's Studies)
Blair Knapp Hall
210A
740-587-6330
Service: 
1995-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Simon Fraser University; M.A., McGill University; Ph.D., Northwestern University
Biography: 

Barbara Fultner, Professor of Philosophy and Women's Studies, joined the faculty at Denison in 1995. She earned a B.A. from Simon Fraser University, an M.A. from McGill University and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University. She teaches courses in philosophy of language, the history of modern philosophy, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of feminism among others. She served as chair of the department from 2004-2008 and is currently the Director of the Women’s Studies Program.

Dr. Fultner was the recipient of a 2008-2009 University of Connecticut Humanities Institute Fellowship, as well as Denison University's R.C. Good Fellowship for 2008-2009.  In 2000, she received Denison's Feminist Teaching Award. Most recently, she has been awarded a “New Directions Initiative” grant by the GLCA to pursue yoga teacher training as part of her research on embodiment, practice, and intersubjectivity. 
Research: 
Dr. Fultner's research interests lie at the cross-roads of analytic and continental philosophy, with a focus on theories of meaning and social practice. She is interested in the nature of normativity and its relationship to the social aspects of language. In her recent work, she has been examining the connections between semantic normativity and the development of intersubjectivity in early childhood as well as the relationship between convention and creativity in dialogue. She also has strong interests in feminist philosophy. Her articles have appeared in journals including Philosophical Studies, Philosophy and Social Criticism, and The International Journal of Philosophical Studies and in several edited collections. She is translator of Jürgen Habermas Truth and Justification (MIT Press 2003) and his On the Pragmatics of Social Interaction (MIT Press 2000). She is the editor of Habermas: Key Concepts (Acumen 2011).
Curriculum Vitae: 
Show Profile

Fadhel Kaboub dr. Kaboub, Fadhel Kaboub

Fadhel Kaboub
Faculty  |  International Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Economics
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
228
740-587-6315
Service: 
2008-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Tunis University of Economics and Management, Tunisia; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri, Kansas City
Biography: 

Teaching

  • Econ 101 - Intro Macroeconomics
  • Econ 301 - Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • Econ 411 - Monetary Theory
  • Econ 440 - The Political Economy of Globalization
  • Econ 441 - The Political Economy of the Middle East
Show Profile

Andrew Z. Katz Katz, Andrew Z. Z. Katz

Andrew Z. Katz
Faculty  |  Political Science, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
305A
740-587-6405
Service: 
1993-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Brandeis University; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University
Research: 

Research Interests
International Politics

International Relations Theory
Liberalism and Peace

Foreign Policy

Domestic sources of U.S. foreign policy since the Vietnam War, especially the role of public opinion and Congress

Show Profile

Ross M. LaRoe dr. LaRoe, Ross M. M. LaRoe

Ross M. LaRoe
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Economics
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
208
740-587-6473
Service: 
1985-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of Missouri; M.S., Wright State University; Ph.D., American University
Research: 

My current research is on the political economy of Social Security reform. The Social Security Amendments of 1939 put the program on its modern trajectory. A pay-as-you-go approach to financing the program was firmly established and benefits were granted to spouses of retired workers and to dependents of deceased workers. These changes were made based on the recommendations of an Advisory Council on Social Security that was composed of members representing employers, employees, and the public. Two prominent economists of the period, Paul Douglas and Alvin Hansen, were among those members of the council chosen to represent the public.

I am currently involved in investigating their role in shaping the council's recommendations. I am particularly interested in how their views of the economic issues of the day shaped their analysis of the council's work.

Curriculum Vitae: 
Show Profile

Tony J. Lisska Lisska, Anthony J. J. Lisska

Tony J. Lisska
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Maria Theresa Barney Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
205E
740-587-5616
Service: 
1969-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Providence College; M.A., St. Stephen's College; Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

I was educated at Providence College, graduating in 1963 with an AB degree (Cum Laude) in Philosophy. I continued my work in Philosophy, receiving my MA from St. Stephen’s College and my Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. In addition, I have a Certificate from the Institute for Educational Management at Harvard University. I presently hold an endowed professorship in the Department on Philosophy, and earlier I was awarded the Charles and Nancy Brickman Distinguished Service Chair.

My most important graduate school mentor—although we didn’t use that term in the late 1960s—was Robert G. Turnbull, Chair of the Department of Philosophy at Ohio State and himself a most distinguished scholar/teacher. It was Bob Turnbull who forced me to re-think the scholastic philosophy from my earlier academic work with the insights and rigor of contemporary analytic philosophy. That combination indeed made my scholarly life. I have published nearly sixty philosophical articles, essays in books, and book reviews in The American Journal of Jurisprudence, Teaching Philosophy, The Thomist, New Blackfriars (Oxford), The Heythrop Journal (London), International Philosophical Quarterly, Cross Currents, Speculum, Philosophy in Review and The Psychological Record. I have also read philosophy papers, nearly ninety in all, at all three divisional meetings of the American Philosophical Association, several regional Philosophy associations, and Institutes for Medieval Philosophy, among other conferences. My scholarly work has been directed towards the texts of Thomas Aquinas, the great thirteenth century Aristotelian. Recent work centered on constructing an analytic explicatio textus of Aquinas’s work on ethical naturalism, which culminated in Aquinas Theory of Natural Law: An Analytic Reconstruction; this book appeared in 1996 from the Clarendon Press of Oxford University Press. A paperback edition was published in 1997 and reprinted in 2001. A more recent book-length manuscript has focused on Aquinas’s account of perception in his philosophy of mind and how this contrasts radically from the Cartesian model so prevalent in Modern Philosophy. Recent lectures were given at Northwestern University, Iona College, The University of Notre Dame, The University of North Florida, Kenyon College, Marquette University, Villanova University, Oklahoma State University, Luther College, The University of Scranton, the national meetings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association and the Central and Pacific Divisions of the American Philosophical Association, The International Thomas Aquinas Society, the Thomas More Society, and the Smithsonian Institute. I gave the 2002 Aquinas Lecture at Providence College on recent scholarly work on the philosophy of Thomas Aquinas, the 2004 Suarez Lecture at Fordham University on “recta ratio” in Aquinas and Ockham, presented the 2006 Aquinas Lecture on Aquinas and Natural Law at St. Thomas University in New Brunswick and gave the Larwill Lecture at Kenyon College in 2013 on Natural Law Issues in Classical and Contemporary philosophy. An essay on natural law appeared in Contemporary Legal Problems: 1998 (OUP) and another in Virtue’s End: God in the Moral Philosophy of Aristotle and Aquinas (St. Augustine Press, 2008). Two chapters, one on Aquinas and natural law and the other on later medieval philosophy of law, recently appeared in an international series on jurisprudence: Volume Six of A Treatise of Legal Philosophy and General Jurisprudence: A History of the Philosophy of Law from the Ancient Greeks to the Scholastics (Springer, 2007). A chapter on Aquinas’s Theory of Mind appeared in a monograph entitled Analytical Thomism (Ashgate: 2006). In 2006, I served as the elected national President of the American Catholic Philosophical Association; I delivered the presidential address at the annual meetings held in Granville on issues in inner sense in Aquinas.

Teaching at an undergraduate college like Denison was always an aspiration. Working with students and helping them become connected with philosophy is an activity I treasure immensely. In my early teaching days, I was concerned that materials in philosophy either talked down to beginning students or were too difficult for them. With this problem in mind, I wrote Philosophy Matters (Charles Merrill: 1978), which combined what I took to be the best of an anthology and the best of an analytic commentary. This book went through five printings and has been re-printed privately for the 2013-14 academic year. In 1990, I received the Sears Teaching Award at Denison and in 1994 received the Carnegie Foundation United States Baccalaureate Colleges Professor of the Year Award. My listing appears in the Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in the Mid-west, and Who’s Who in American Education.

My intellectual avocation is regional history. I served on the Board of Management of the Granville Historical Society for fifteen years; there another member and I began a quarterly, The Historical Times, which in 1991 won a state historical award. I still serve as an editor of this quarterly. I have published over forty articles on local history, the most widely read treating an early 19th century Roman Catholic Bishop who worked with Native Americans appeared in Oxford’s New Blackfriars (1993). In addition, I have given over thirty presentations on topics in regional history. In 1985, I published A History of Aquinas College High School and am presently completing A Short History of East Columbus, Ohio. I am the author of An Illustrated History of the Buckeye Lake Yacht Club, which was published in 2007. I am an editor of Volume One of the 2005 Bicentennial History of Granville, which appeared in late 2004. This book contains a chapter that I co-authored; Volume Two contains two of my historical essays. This three-volume set recently received a national award from the National Association of State and Local Historians.

I served Denison University as Dean of the College for a five-year period, chaired the Philosophy Department twice—and once again for 2008-2009—and served as the founding Director of the Honors Program for fifteen years. I have been an evaluator for curriculum projects on four occasions for The National Endowment for the Humanities and have served as an external consultant for Honors Program development and philosophy department evaluation. I am a founding member of the National Association of Fellowship Advisors. Recent Honors Program narratives have been presented to the American Council of Academic Deans and at the National Meetings of the National Collegiate Honors Council. I was the central author for Denison’s North Central accreditation project in 1980. In 2004 and again in 2008, I served as President of The Granville Foundation.

Curriculum Vitae: 
Show Profile

Jonathan Maskit dr. Maskit, Jonathan Maskit

Jonathan Maskit
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Assistant Professor & Chair (Philosophy, Politics & Economics)
Blair Knapp Hall
205K
740-587-5641
2001
2002
Service: 
1997-2001, 2002-Present
Degree(s): 
A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University
Biography: 

Assistant Professor Jonathan Maskit joined the faculty at Denison in 1996. He earned an A.B. from Vassar College and an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University.

Jonathan Maskit teaches courses in aesthetics, continental philosophy, environmental philosophy, the history of philosophy, and others. His research focuses on the relationship between culture, nature, and art drawing particularly on the work of Kant, Heidegger, and Deleuze and Guattari. He is currently working on a book on this theme and has published articles and reviews in Research in Philosophy and Technology, Philosophy & Geography, Ethics, and Canadian Philosophical Reviews. He has also contributed to a number of edited volumes and has seen some of his work anthologized. He has been a visiting scholar at the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium) and the University of Potsdam (Germany) and has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, The Belgian-American Educational Foundation, and The Global Partners Project. He serves as the Reviews Editor for Ethics, Place, & Environment.

Show Profile

John McHugh dr. McHugh, John W. McHugh

John McHugh
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Visiting Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
201l
740-587-5897
Service: 
2011-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Providence College; Ph.D., Boston University
Show Profile

Tim Miller dr. Miller, Timothy I. Miller

Dr.Miller, Timothy I. Miller
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Professor
Higley Hall
205
740-587-6403
Service: 
1978-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts; M.S., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., Southern Illinois University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to Econometrics, Consumer Economies, Mathematical Macroeconomics

Show Profile

Mark Moller Moller, Mark Moller

Moller, Mark Moller
Staff, Senior Administration  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, First-Year Program
Dean First Year Students, Associate Professor
Higley Hall
119
740-587-6668
Service: 
1996-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Bucknell University; M.A., Ph.D., Washington University, St. Louis
Show Profile

Heather N. Pool Pool, Heather N. N. Pool

Heather N. Pool
Faculty  |  Political Science, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
740-587-6503
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., St. John's College (Santa Fe) M.A., University of Washington Ph.D., University of Washington
Biography: 

I have led a peripatetic life. I grew up in Oklahoma, went to school in New Mexico and Maryland, then moved to New Jersey and New York, then moved to Seattle, Washington, to attend graduate school at the University of Washington.  The Midwest is one of the few locales I have had little experience with, so I’m looking forward to exploring this corner of the world. 

In addition to spending lots of time in different places, I have also held a variety of jobs.  From joining the Oklahoma Air National Guard as a senior in high school to spending a summer as a packer for a moving company to deciding it would be great fun to be a over-the-road truck driver (it wasn’t fun for very long) to working briefly for Martha Stewart’s media corporation, I’ve had enough jobs to know that being a professor is just about the best job there is.  In addition to reading foundational works of historic significance as a political theorist, I have the opportunity to interact with students whose creativity, character, and persistence inspire me to work ever harder to be a better teacher.  A job at a school like Denison – where pedagogy is a common point of conversation among the faculty, but where research is given space and support – is exactly what I hoped for when I started graduate school.

In addition to summer research and teaching during the school year, I enjoy a range of outdoor activities, particularly hiking and camping.  My goal is always to find a way to spend a week each year in Washington and a week in New Mexico; sadly, I fail at this regularly. My partner of 14 years, Lisa Clarke, is currently in Washington, DC, where she serves as a Teacher Ambassador Fellow at the US Department of Education.

Research: 

Using the resources of critical and normative political theory, sociolegal scholarship, race and gender scholarship, and American political development, my research focuses on how ideas, events, and institutions shape political identities.

My dissertation, completed in 2011, focused on moments when the deaths of everyday citizens led to some kind of political change.  An article taken from my dissertation appeared in Polity in 2012 as “The Politics of Mourning: The Triangle Fire and the Consolidation of Political Identity.” In that article, I examine the Triangle Fire of 1911 as an example of how mourning the loss of everyday citizens can become an effective means of calling for political change, with a particular focus on how the racial identities of the victims shaped the conversation. Another article, drawn from my dissertation, is forthcoming in 2014 in Law, Culture and the Humanities; “Mourning Emmett Till” considers the role of Emmett Till’s 1955 murder in the new interest of Northern whites in civil rights struggles in the South. I am in the process of revising my dissertation into a monograph, which I intend to get under contract by the end of the summer 2014.

Additionally, a forthcoming article on pedagogy, co-authored with Allison Rank, is forthcoming in 2014 in PS: Political Science & Politics and it titled “Writing Better Writing Assignments.” Both Allison and I were directors of a social science Writing Center at a major R1 university, and found that a considerable challenge faced by student writers was confusingly written paper assignments. So we joined forces to think about how to write clear prompts that accomplish specific tasks.

Curriculum Vitae: 
Show Profile

Steve Vogel Vogel, Steven Vogel

Steve Vogel
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Brickman - Shannon Professor & Chair (Philosophy)
740-587-6579
Service: 
1984-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ph.D., Boston University
Biography: 

Steve Vogel, who holds an A.B. from Yale University and a Ph.D. from Boston University, has been a member of the Philosophy Department at Denison since 1984. He teaches courses in continental philosophy, nineteenth-century philosophy, environmental ethics, social and political philosophy, and logic. He has special research interests in environmental philosophy, in the work of Jürgen Habermas and of the Frankfurt School, and in Marxism, Hegel, and Heidegger. He is the author of Against Nature: The Concept of Nature in Critical Theory, published in 1996 by SUNY Press, and has published articles in Environmental Ethics, Environmental Values, Philosophy Today, Rethinking Marxism, Social Theory and Practice, Tikkun, Dissent, and elsewhere. In 2003 he was awarded the Charles A. Brickman Award for Teaching Excellence at Denison.

Interview with C.S. Soong on KPFA's Against the Grain, 3/13/13

Curriculum Vitae: 
Show Profile

Andrea L. Ziegert Ziegert, Andrea L. Ziegert

Andrea L. Ziegert
Faculty  |  Economics, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Associate Professor & Chair (Economics)
Higley Hall
209
740-587-6575
Service: 
1997-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., M.A., Miami University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to Microeconomics, Income Inequality, Environmental Economics

Research Interests: personality and learning in economics, poverty and income distribution, lotteries and government finance

Show Profile