Courses2016-2017

For the college’s course catalog, please visit the Courses section. For courses currently offered, please visit the Schedule of Classes.

It is expected that students will master the techniques and skills that are associated with the primary and secondary injury survey, immediate care, basic life support, and injury stabilization. Students who master the standards will receive American Red Cross certification in first aid and CPR. Students who expect to major in athletic training must complete the CPR for the professional rescuer prior to the conclusion of their first-year.
This course is designed to give students a comprehensive look at women in sport: past, present and future. This course will examine, analyze and synthesize the issues surrounding women. Each topic will be studied through readings, films, class discussions and reflect sport from historical, psychological, sociological, physiological, political and philosophical perspectives. This course satisfies the G.E. Minority/Women's and Gender Studies requirement. Cross-listed with WGST 320.
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the major issues in the world of contemporary sports. Most primary issues impacting contemporary sports are covered including gender inequity, race and ethnicity, youth, adolescent, college, and professional sports, media involvement, economics of sport, etc.
This course will introduce students to the art and science of coaching. Students will explore different coaching philosophies and the principles of effective coaching. Coaching student athletes of different race and gender will also be explored. Proper communication skills, sport pedagogy and sport physiology will also be presented. Students will read about different coaches that are leaders in their sport, and compare their methods to coaching. Students will discuss motivational strategies and current issues and trends in coaching athletes of all ages.
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
This course will examine the historical foundations of physical education, health and athletics through a study of the development of each area from early cultures to the present. Students will be introduced to the different philosophical theories that have influenced the profession and will start to develop their own philosophy. Students will discuss moral reasoning and ways to develop principles that will help preserve ethical values in sport. The psychological, sociological and cultural aspects of sport will be reviewed with an emphasis on the principles and ideas of the leaders who helped shape the profession. Fulfills G.E. Social Science.
This course is designed to present introductory material that pertains to the study of athletic training. Material presented during lecture and laboratory experiences include: organization of the athletic training profession, functions of and interactions between medical and allied health professions, medical terminology, common medical conditions, principles of fitness, and methods by which athletic injuries are stabilized using tape and braces. Laboratories involve the teaching, demonstration, and mastery of taping, bracing, and splint construction. This class must be completed prior to the completion of the student's first-year if the student desires to major in athletic training. Three class periods and one laboratory weekly.
An in-depth study of the organization and function of anatomical structures within the human body. Topics include: skin, connective tissue, nervous, musculature, skeletal, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, and urinary systems. Students who expect to major in athletic training must complete this course prior to the conclusion of their first-year.
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
A study of the biological, psychological, and sociological data underlying a full spectrum of health related behaviors. A variety of topics including physical health, sexual habits and health, drug and alcohol use and family dynamics will be covered. In addition, students will complete a number of self-assessments with respect to their related behaviors.
This course will explore the theoretical and empirical research pertaining to the psychological determinants of athletic performance. Areas of interest include the history of sport psychology, personality, motivation, goal setting, fundamental beliefs, anxiety, causal attribution, communication and intra-term dynamics. The culminating experience of the course is a major paper in which students are expected to apply theory and research into a practical setting as they design a program to help improve some aspect of their athletic performance or promote an injured athlete's psychological well being during rehabilitation. Class includes a lab designed to be a setting in which students gain field experience through the practical application of the theories of sport psychology. Fulfills G.E. Social Science.
This course is designed to present the foundation of nutrition as it relates to physical education, athletics and the active population. The student will study the physiological processes involved in nutrition, as well as healthy eating habits, nutritional programming, and the disorders involved in the nutritional realm. Prerequisite: PHED 344, Personal and Community Health.
This lecture/laboratory course is designed to present the foundation of therapeutic modalities that are common to the area of injury/illness rehabilitation. Among the topics included in lecture and laboratory experiences are: biologic process of wound healing, thermal agents, cryotherapy, hydrotherapy, ultrasound, therapeutic drugs, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. This course includes one laboratory session each week during which students will demonstrate the therapeutic techniques discussed in lecture. Fulfills R requirement/Oral Communication. Prerequisite: HESS 202.
This course is a study of the anatomical and mechanical fundamentals of human motion. The course will examine various joint systems in the body with an emphasis on the forces and biomechanical factors that operate on the muscles, connective tissue and bones in each joint system. Sports specific movements and injury risk factors will also be discussed. Prerequisite: HESS 202.
This is a course aimed at introducing students to the behavioral basis of diseases. It provides an important foundation for students in the understanding of diseases and the role of behavioral decision making in chronic disease prevention. Emphasis will be placed on the behavioral aspects of disease processes, as well as its relationship to public health and health promotion.
This course provides the opportunity to gain practical experience working in various professional settings in the field of Physical Education. This course is graded S/U. Students will meet with a faculty member from the Department of Physical Education who will become the practicum instructor. If students plan to complete the practicum with an outside agency, it is recommended that arrangements be made in regard to field placement site prior to final registration. For details regarding this procedure, see the course instructor prior to pre-registration. Consent of the instructor is required for enrollment. Practicums may involve field experience which may be arranged in coaching, teaching, sports management, sports administration, etc. Athletic Training I (offered fall), Athletic Training II (offered spring), Athletic Training III (offered fall), Athletic Training IV (offered spring), Athletic Training V (offered fall), Athletic Training VI (offered spring).
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
Students will study the administration of athletics, physical education and club/intramural sports. Students will be introduced to the various means of structuring an organization in order to achieve the objectives of physical education and athletics. The course will cover budget and various management functions, as well as the essential elements of leadership needed for the efficient administration of sport related programs. (Offered spring semester)
This lecture/laboratory course provides an opportunity for students to comprehend and master the techniques by which orthopedic injuries and common illnesses are evaluated by health care professionals. Each week students are presented with one laboratory session in which the evaluative techniques discussed during lecture are demonstrated and mastered. Prerequisite: HESS 202.
The primary purpose of this course is to study the effects of physical activity on human physiology. Various forms of exercise will be considered relative to both their immediate and long-range effects. Topics include history; stress and general adaptation syndrome; stress in relation to exercise and the endocrine system; motor activity; skeletal muscle structure and function; energy metabolism and recovery; and principles of conditioning and the training effects.
This lecture/laboratory course is designed to present the foundation of therapeutic exercises that are common to the area of injury rehabilitation. Among the topics included in lecture and laboratory experiences are: range of motion, resistance exercise, stretching, joint mobilization, and neuromuscular control. This course includes one laboratory session each week during which students will demonstrate the therapeutic techniques discussed in lecture.