Courses

For the college’s course catalog, please visit the Courses section. For courses currently offered, please visit the Schedule of Classes.

Introductory Topics in Education (EDUC-199)
A general category used only for the evaluation of transfer credit.
The U.S. Education System (EDUC-213)
Students will develop a thorough and systematic understanding of the development of education and schooling in the United States. Relationships between school and society will be analyzed primarily from a historical perspective. Themes include the connection between liberty and literacy, centralized versus local control of schools, expansion of schooling, inequities in schooling, and the differentiated curriculum.
Approaches to Environmental Education (EDUC-220)
Environmental education is a broad term, encompassing a large array of ideas concerned with the purpose of and approach to engagement with the physical environment that should ultimately lead to environmental stewardship. Approaches to Environmental Education will address the "what" and "how" of environmental education. Students will be exposed to the various definitions and purposes of environmental education as well as the multiple approaches used to achieve these purposes. Through readings and hands-on experiences we will explore multiple practices in the field. Finally, we will develop our own environmental education curriculum based on our experiences in the class.
Technology & Learning (EDUC-245)
This course will explore a variety of technology (emphasis on multi-media and Web 2.0 tools) so students interested in the field of education will not only become proficient in the practical use of technology, but determine when technology is appropriate, how it can be used to enhance learning and how to assess its usefulness in the academic setting. This course will include a combination of discussion, lecture, video, and hands-on computer work. Attendance at evening lectures may be required.
The Learner and the Teacher: Childhood (EDUC-249)
This course explores the learning-teacher process in the elementary grades. Topics for the course include learning theories, developmental patterns of the young child, learning profiles, differentiated instruction, and methods of teaching. This course includes a three-hour commitment each week to an area school classroom. The student will complete a variety of activities that focus on the learner, the teacher and the learning-teaching process, using the school experience as a "laboratory" to gather primary sources of information. A fee is required for state-mandated background check. Normally offered Spring semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.
The Learner and the Teacher: Adolescence (EDUC-250)
This course explores the learning-teaching process in middle and high school environments. Topics draw from neuroscience research on learning, multiple intelligence theory, and scholarship on issues regarding peer socialization, mental health, body image, gender and sexual identity, and active participation strategies. This course includes a three-hour commitment each week to an area school classroom or community agency. The student will complete a variety of activities that focus on the learner, the teacher, and the learning-teaching process, using the school or agency experience as a "laboratory" to gather primary sources of information. A fee is required for state-mandated background check. Normally offered Fall semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.
General Methods of Teaching (EDUC-270)
This course is designed to extend students' understanding of the discipline of teaching and provide in-depth practice of strategies introduced in previous courses. Elements include planning, instructional strategies, assessment, motivation, student groupings and classroom management. Assignments require students to put course concepts into practice. Normally offered Spring semester. Prerequisite: EDUC 249 or EDUC 250.
Field Experience (EDUC-280)
The student may request to apprentice in a local school, social service agency, or non-profit organization with a teacher or other supervisor. The student will observe and provide assistance in the setting and confer regularly with the Field Experience Coordinator through journaling and class meetings. A fee is required for state-mandated background check. Normally offered Fall Semester. Prerequisite: EDUC 249 or EDUC 250.
Intermediate Topics in Education (EDUC-299)
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
Philosophy of Education (EDUC-300)
In this course students consider questions regarding how people learn and the role of education in society from a philosophical perspective. Class members read primary works of selected educational theorists including Plato, Isocrates, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, Dewey, and Martin. Students develop a familiarity with major educational themes of the past and engage current issues and problems in education. Normally offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: EDUC 213.
Literacy and Learning: Theory and Practice (EDUC-312)
The purpose of this course is to explore reading and writing in schools, communities, and families. Emphasis is placed on theories of literacy and learning as a way to think about classroom instruction, variation in reading and writing as social practices, and policies and position statements surrounding these practices. The course includes a 20-25-hour service-learning commitment in an area school or community organization. Normally offered Fall semester. Prerequisites: EDUC 249 or 250.
Gay and Lesbian Issues in Education (EDUC-330)
In this seminar students will examine gay and lesbian issues in what is, arguably, the most central social institution in American culture. We will begin with an introduction to the study of sexuality, and read critical texts in the queer history of education. Turning to the contemporary landscape, the course addresses legal issues regarding sexuality in the United States as they pertain to schooling. Normally offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: EDUC 213 or QS 101.
Special Topics (EDUC-345)
Independent study or seminar work on selected topics under the guidance of staff members. Prerequisite: Consent of chairperson.
Special Topics (EDUC-346)
Independent study or seminar work on selected topics under the guidance of staff members. Prerequisite: Consent of chairperson.
History of African American Education (EDUC-360)
The goal of this course is to examine the historical experiences of African Americans in education and related aspects of life. Much of the course will focus on Blacks' experiences in schooling in the South from Reconstruction to the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. In addition, students will contrast African American schooling experiences with those of Native Americans and others during this period. Students who enjoy and benefit from cooperative and participatory learning environments are encouraged to take this course. Prerequisite: EDUC 213 OR BLST 235.
Directed Study (EDUC-361)
Directed Study (EDUC-362)
Independent Study (EDUC-363)
Independent Study (EDUC-364)
Critical Pedagogy: Gender, Race and Class in U.S Education (EDUC-390)
In its examination of current pressing issues in U.S. education, the central concern throughout this course is the relationship between school and society. Particular attention is given to pedagogies informed by critical theory. The course includes a 25-30-hour service-learning or field placement commitment in an area school or community organization. Prerequisite: EDUC 213.
Advanced Topics in Education (EDUC-399)
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
Senior Seminar (EDUC-421)
Students will build upon knowledge and understanding of selected topics developed in previous coursework in education, develop the skills required in the process of doing research and preparing work for presentation or publication, and reflect upon study in the major through a culminating portfolio assignment. Prerequisites: Senior standing in Educational Studies.
Senior Research (EDUC-451)
Senior Research (EDUC-452)