Courses

For the college’s course catalog, please visit the Courses section. For courses currently offered, please visit the Schedule of Classes.

Film Aesthetics and Analysis (CINE-104)
An introduction to the study of cinema as an art form. The focus is on the analysis of narrative (as well as some non-narrative forms of cinema) and film style (the elements of film technique such as editing, cinematography, lighting and color, staging, and sound). Students learn to identify these elements of cinema aesthetics and analyze the ways in which they work in a variety of different types of film, including Hollywood films, art cinema, documentary, and avant-garde/experimental film. Required weekly film screenings. Required for all Cinema majors and minors: majors and minors should complete CINE 104 by the end of their first year.
Special Topics in Cinema (CINE-150)
Selected topics in Cinema.
Elementary Cinema Production (CINE-219)
An introductory digital production course exploring the nature of the cinematic medium from the point of view of production and technique, with an emphasis upon cinema as an aesthetic form. Each student will complete a series of projects in the digital format. Students are required to share in the expenses of their digital productions. Required of Cinema majors. No prerequisites.
Intermediate Topics in Cinema (CINE-299)
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
Introduction to Animation (CINE-308)
Animation is the illusion of motion created by the consecutive display of slightly varying drawings or models of static elements. In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of traditional animation techniques, as well as cover many aspects of the more experimental contemporary forms of stop-motion animation processes. Students will be given several animation "studies" over the course of the semester that will offer them experience with different types of stop-motion and computer key-framed techniques, as well as experience in story-boarding, sound recording, character movement and rig development, and post digital effects work. In addition to workshop projects, students will be exposed to outside readings and film viewings.
Intermediate Cinema Production (CINE-310)
An introductory course in 16mm film examining this chemical-based medium in both theory and practice. Each student will complete a series of short film projects with an emphasis on film grammar, film aesthetics, and all facets of film production. Students are required to share in the expenses of their film productions. Required of Cinema majors. Prerequisite: CINE 219.
Cinema Seminar (CINE-312)
The subject for these seminars varies from year to year, and offers the advanced student of cinema intensive and humanistic investigation of specialized generic, stylistic, and creative problems in the fields of film and/or video. Research papers, screenings, critical essays, readings. Prerequisite: one cinema course or consent of instructor. Repeatable.
History of Cinema (CINE-326)
An overview of some major trends in the history of cinema from its invention to the present. Individual films provide a basis for the exploration of the larger developments in technology, economics, politics, and culture that make up their historical context. The course also focuses on the development of critical skills for assessing arguments about film history, including analyzing written historical texts, comparing and contrasting competing historical arguments, and conducting film-historical research. The scope of the course is international, and encompasses a variety of important periods, film genres and modes, and national film movements. Required weekly film screenings. Required for all Cinema majors and minor; it is recommended that majors and minors complete CINE 326 by the end of their second year.
Screenwriting (CINE-328)
A workshop-style course on dramatic narrative writing for the screen. Students learn the specific format of the standard film script, but more importantly engage in critical examination of the unique nature of cinematic narrative in both feature length and short films. The course considers both classical narrative film and its alternatives, including art cinema, independent film, and the short film. Analysis of scripts and finished films alike is supplemented by readings from screenwriting manuals and scholarly writing on narrative form, addressing such things as plot structure, character, dramatic conflict, description, and dialogue. As a writing workshop, the course also emphasizes general aspects of good writing technique and the processes of editing and revision. Frequent exercises and assignments in and out of class allow students to hone specific writing skills and develop their understanding of narrative form and ability to create compelling stories. No Prerequisites. Cinema elective; open to non-majors.
Directed Study (CINE-361)
Directed Study (CINE-362)
Independent Study (CINE-363)
Independent Study (CINE-364)
Advanced Topics in Cinema (CINE-399)
A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.
Jr./Sr. Film Production Seminar (CINE-407)
These seminars vary from year-to-year, and offer junior and senior cinema students intensive inquiry into specific cinematic production topics. Prerequisite: CINE 410 or consent of instructor. Repeatable.
Jr./Sr. Film Studies Seminar (CINE-408)
These seminars vary from year-to-year, and offer junior and senior cinema students intensive inquiry into specialized topics in film studies. Prerequisite: CINE 104 or consent of Instructor. Repeatable.
Advanced Cinema Production (CINE-410)
A production course designed for the advanced student of cinema. A rigorous and intensive practical course in the techniques of sound motion picture production. Working in the 16mm format, students complete a series of individual and group projects. Students learn the fundamentals of production management, camera work, sensitometry, lighting, sound recording and mixing, double-system editing, printing and laboratory processes. Students are required to share in the expenses of their productions. Required of Cinema majors. Prerequisite: CINE 310.
Theory of Cinema (CINE-412)
This course examines major concepts and important writings in film theory from the 1920s to the present. Students engage with a wide variety of theories: on the nature of cinema as an art form, its relationship to the other arts, its meaning-making capacities, its aesthetic and psychological powers, and its potential social and political effects. Theories are critically examined for their argumentative structures and use of evidence, and assessed in comparison to other theories. The scope of the course typically includes Modernist and realist film theories of the "classical" period, and more recent approaches to film theory informed by structuralism and post-structuralism, semiotics, Marxism, feminism, psychoanalytic and cognitive psychology, and queer theory. Required weekly film screenings. Prerequisite: CINE 104. Required for all Cinema majors; Typically only offered during the fall semester.
Cinema Workshop (CINE-419)
Designed for a limited number of students who have demonstrated significant ability in cinema production. The course involves students in the creation of works of cinematic art in 16mm sound format as a total process from script to screen. Some advanced video production may be permissible, by consent. Students are required to share in the expenses of their productions. Repeatable up to a limit of 16 credit hours. It should be noted that Cinema Workshop is not designed to provide professional training but rather to permit students to explore their creative abilities while employing professional tools and procedures. Prerequisites: CINE 410.
Senior Research (CINE-451)
Senior Research (CINE-452)