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Lynda Bombach Bombach, Lynda K. Bombach

Staff  |  Whisler Center for Student Wellness
Clinic Coordinator
Whisler Hall
740-587-6200
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Zuzana Bombardier Bombardier, Zuzana Bombardier

Staff  |  International Studies
Academic Administrative Assistant
Fellows Hall
422
740-587-6369
Service: 
2013-Present
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Don Bonar dr. Bonar, Daniel Bonar

Don Bonar
Faculty  |  Computer Science, Mathematics
Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
212
740-587-6407
1968
1969
Service: 
1965-1968, 1969-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S.Ch.E., M.S., West Virginia University; Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Don Bonar was born in Murraysville, WV (Jackson County) on July 7, 1938, the son of Nelson Edward Bonar II and Ada Polk Bonar. He graduated from Ravenswood High School and was awarded a four-year Board of Governors Scholarship to West Virginia University where he received the B.S. in Chemical Engineering in 1960. While at WVU, he was a member of the physics, chemistry, and chemical engineering honoraries, and served as President of Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honorary. Two National Science Foundation Fellowships supported his graduate work in mathematics. He received the M.S. from WVU in 1961 with a major in mathematics and a minor in physics and the Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1968. His Ph.D. work was in complex analysis. In 1965 Don joined the faculty of Denison University in Granville, OH where he has been teaching mathematics, statistics and computer science.

Awards received include the Richard King Mellon Foundation Award for excellence in teaching and scholarship in 1973 and the Sears-Roebuck Teaching Excellence and Community Leadership Award in 1991. In 1995 he was selected to fill the new fully endowed George R. Stibitz Distinguished Professorship in Mathematics and Computer Science. In 1999 Don was inducted into the Academy of Chemical Engineers at West Virginia University. He is the author of the book entitled On Annular Functions, a co-author of the book Real Infinite Series, and a co-author on several research papers. He has published joint work with the internationally acclaimed Hungarian mathematician Paul Erdos. Community service includes membership on the Granville Foundation, the Granville Development Commission, the Licking County (OH) Joint Vocational School Board (facility recently renamed C-TEC, Career and Technology Education Center of Licking County), and serving as President of the Granville Exempted Village School Board.

Don and his wife Martha Baker Bonar are the parents of Mary Martha, a resident in emergency medicine at the Penn State University Medical Centers in Hershey, PA. Forever Mountaineers, the Bonars enjoy time at their farm, family owned since 1869, in West Virginia.

Research: 

Publications

  • Real Infinite Series (with Michael J. Khoury '03) in Mathematical Association of America (MAA). 2006.
  • On Annular Functions Daniel D. Bonar, 1971.
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Bookstore

Bookstore

P.O. Box 810, Granville, OH 43023 (USPS Only)
740-587-6204
Slayter, 2nd Floor

The Denison University Bookstore, located in Slayter Student Union, is your source for DU textbooks, gear, and supplies. Plus, you can search new and used textbooks, find gear, and purchase apparel and gifts online.

Keith Boone Boone, Keith Boone

Emeriti Faculty  |  Provost's Office
Associate Provost Emeritus
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Dan Boring Boring, Daniel F. Boring

Staff  |  Office & Mail Services
Mail Clerk
Doane Administration
005A
740-587-6796
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Kennard Bork Bork, Kennard Bork

Kennard Bork
Emeriti Faculty  |  Geosciences
Professor Emeritus
Biography: 

Research interests while at Denison have included invertebrate paleontology, field stratigraphy, statistical sedimentology, and the history of geology. My joint research with strong geology majors began in the summer of 1967 (“The Summer of Love” in Haight-Ashbury) and continues to this day. Our primary goals center on decoding the stratigraphy, paleontology, and paleoecology of rock units in Ohio and Indiana. Specific issues in the my history of geology research include British natural theology of the late 1600s, the evolution of geology in 18th and 19th-century France, and the dialogue between American and French mineralogists around 1800. Research on the geological contributions, as well as the social and political activism, of Denison graduate and long-time Harvard geologist Kirtley F. Mather (1888-1978) resulted in publication of my book “CRACKING ROCKS AND DEFENDING DEMOCRACY” (1994, A.A.A.S.).

Research: 

Teaching

G-210 - Historical Geology. treats the history of the planet.

G-315 - Paleontology. considers fossils and their interpretation.

G-314 - Sedimentology & Stratigraphy. looks at the record of rock and the processes that formed our sedimentary veneer.

My teaching concentrates on the evolution of the Earth and its biosphere. Honors courses provide the chance to delve into such fascinating areas as “The Origin of Earth Systems,” “The Evolution-Creation Debate,” “Science in the Age of Enlightenment (18th Century),” and “From Dinosaurs to the Space Age.”

Publications

Bork, K. B. 2004. Review of Vincent L. Morgan and Spencer G. Lucas, (a) Walter Granger, 1872-1941, Paleontologist and (b) Notes From Diary - Fayum Trip, 1907 (of Walter Granger). Earth Sciences History. v. 23, no. 1.

Bork, K. B.. 2003. Liberal arts colleges as launching pads for geologically trained educators and administrators: the case of Denison University. The Compass.

Bork, K. B.. 2003. New frontiers: the evolution of William G. Tight from geomorphologist to university president. Earth Sciences History. v. 22, no. 2, p. 10-35.

Bork, K. B.. 2002. Review of René SIGRIST (edit.), Un Regard Sur La Terre. Isis. v. 93, no. 4, p. 705-706.

Bork, K. B.. 2002. Review of Jean-Claude PONT and Jan LACKI, Jan (Editors), Une Cordée Originale: Histoire des relations entre science et montagne. ISIS,. v. 93. no. 2,

Bork, K. B.. 2001. Review of Albert V. Carozzi's Manuscripts and Publications of Horace-Bénédict de Saussure on the Origin of Basalt. ISIS,. v. 92, no. 3, p. 611.

Bork, K.B.. 2000. Correspondence as a window on the development of a discipline: Brongniart, Cleaveland, Silliman and the maturation of mineralogy in the first decades of the nineteenth century. Earth Sciences History. v. 18, no. 2, p. 44-91.

Bork, K.B.. 2000. Review of Les Plis du Temps, mythe, science et H.-B. de Saussure. Isis. v. 91, no. 2, p. 362-363.

Kölbl-Ebert, Martina and Bork, K.B.. 2000. Report on “Celebrating the Age of the Earth: the William Smith Millennium Meeting” of the Geological Society of London (28-29 June 2000):. EPISODES.

Peters, S.E., and Bork, K.B.. 1999. Species abundance models applied to paleocommunitites in the Waldron Shale (Silurian: Wenlockian), Indiana. Palaios . v. 14, no. 3, p. 234-245.

Bork, K.B.. 1998. Response to the Citation for the Geological Society of American's History of Geology Award 1997. GSA Today. v. 8, no. 3, p. 27-29.

Peters, S. E., and Bork, K. B.. 1998. Secondary tiering on crinoids from the Waldron Shale (Silurian: Wenlockian) of Indiana. Journal of Paleontology. v. 72, no. 5, p. 887-894.

Bork, K.B.. 1997. La Relation entre Brongniart et Cleaveland, mise en évidence par un examplaire dédicacé du Mémoire sur les Terrains de Sédiment Superieurs Calcaéo-Trappéens de Vicentin de Brongniart. De la géologie à son histoire: ouvrage édité en hommage à François Ellenberger: Comité des travaux historiques et scientifiques (Paris). p. 129-137.

Bork, K.B.. 1999. Parker Cleaveland. In American National Biography, Oxford University Press. v. 5, p. 42-44.

Bork, K.B.. 1998. Stratigraphy. Garland Encyclopedia of Earth Science History. v. 2, p. 799-807.

Bork, K. B.. 1996. Alexandre Brongniart. MacMillian Encyclopedia of Earth Sciences. p. 59-61.

Bork, K.B.. 1994. Cracking Rocks and Defending Democracy: Kirtley Fletcher Mather. American Association for the Advancement of Science. p. 336.

If asked to classify myself on one of those occupational charts, I guess that I'd have to suggest the term “liberal arts scientist.” As I reflect on my thirty-five plus years at Denison, it is evident that part of the fun and reward relates to my being able to interact with a wide range of ideas and a wonderful parade of students. Certainly, I have used my training in geology, but also have had the opportunity to consider historical topics, frequently employing French as an entry into interesting avenues of investigation. In regular courses, summer research (field, lab, and library), sabbaticals in Paris, and in Honors courses, it has been a pleasure to learn and communicate about the worlds of geoscience and historical ideas.

It is also gratifying to be part of Denison's tradition in geology. Back in the 19th century the college dedicated itself to excellence in the natural sciences. A long string of exceptional graduates attests to the success of that concept. From the late 1800s to today, Denison geologists have played significant roles in academic, corporate, and geological-survey areas of our discipline. Beyond such a claim are real individuals, and it has been a delight to know so many of them and to have worked with every geology graduate of the last three decades.

My publication record and service as an officer in various national and international organizations paid off in a most gratifying way in 1997, when I received the History of Geology Award from the Geological Society of America. Because the award is worldwide in scope and every past awardee has been from a major university, it was a surprising but pleasant recognition, both for me and for liberal arts colleges such as Denison.

In the year 2000, it was a genuine delight to receive the Neil Miner Award of the National Association of Geology Teachers. The award, given to one North American college professor each year, is “the highest award given in recognition of exceptional contributions to the stimulation of interest in the Earth Sciences.”

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Cynthia Bowling Bowling, Cynthia Bowling

Staff  |  Human Resources
Human Resources Assistant
Doane Administration
740-587-6725
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David Boyd dr. Boyd, David W. Boyd

Dr.Boyd, David W. Boyd
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
229
740-587-6317
Service: 
1991-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Intermediate Microeconomics, Industrial Organization, Mathematical Economics

Research: 

Research Interests: Applied Microeconomics

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Laura Boyd dr. Boyd, Laura A. Boyd

Dr.Boyd, Laura A. Boyd
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
203
740-587-6316
Service: 
1991-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Carleton College; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to & Intermediate Microeconomics, Econometrics, Labor Economics, Applied Econometrics

Research Interests: Economics of education, earnings equations, economics of sports

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Brenda Boyle Boyle, Brenda Boyle

Brenda Boyle
Faculty  |  English, International Studies, Queer Studies, Writing Center
Associate Professor, English/Writing Center Director
Barney-Davis Hall
316
740-587-5770
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
A.B., Davidson College; M.A., University of Southern California; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

As a member of the English faculty and Director of the Writing Center, Brenda Boyle is interested in American literature of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with a special focus on issues of rhetoric, race, gender, sexuality, and disability. Her research and publications extend from the study of American masculinity's formations in war, especially the Vietnam War, to representations of gender and sexuality through disability, to gender in The Gilmore Girls. She teaches classes in composition and rhetoric, British and American modernism, the contemporary novel, fiction and non-fiction war narratives, and academic writing.

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James Bradshaw Bradshaw, James I. Bradshaw

Staff  |  Security, Safety & Risk Management
Switchboard Operator/Dispatcher
Burton D. Morgan Center
Parking Garage
740-587-0810
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Michael C. Brady dr. Brady, Michael C. C. Brady

Michael C. Brady
Faculty  |  Political Science, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Lugar Program in Politics and Public Service
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
305D
740-587-6502
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University
Biography: 

Michael joined the political science department at Denison in the fall of 2009.  His dissertation focuses on the role of parties and partisanship in conference committee negotiations between the House and Senate.  More broadly, his research and teaching centers around the study of political institutions, campaigns and elections, and political parties in the United States.  

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Debbie Brent Brent, Debra Jane Brent

Staff  |  Facilities Services
Building Services Shift Supervisor
Facilities Services
740-587-6550
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Zack Brent ’07 Brent, Zachary Robert Boruchow Brent ’7

Zack Brent '07
Staff  |  Big Red Athletics
Assistant Football Coach
Mitchell Recreation and Athletics Center
RG21
740-587-6585
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Denison University
Biography: 

A 2007 graduate of Denison University, Zack Brent has served as an assistant football coach since 2010 and has been the team’s Defensive Coordinator since 2011.
Prior to returning to the Big Red sidelines, Brent spent the previous four seasons as an assistant coach at the University of Colorado and Michigan Tech.

After graduating from Denison, Brent spent the 2007 and 2008 seasons as the recruiting assistant at Colorado. In 2009 he moved to the upper peninsula of Michigan as a graduate assistant for the Michigan Tech Huskies. An NCAA Division II institution and a member of the highly competitive Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, Brent coached the defensive backs.

In addition to his experiences coaching at Colorado and Michigan Tech, while studying abroad during his junior year at Denison, Brent served as the player development intern for NFL Europe and was the assistant coach for the London Warriors, the London Youth National Team.
As a player for the Big Red, Brent was a four-year starter at wide receiver.  On Sept. 27, 2004 he was named the North Coast Athletic Conference Offensive Player of the Week after leading DU to a win over 35-23 win over Gettysburg.

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Tom Bressoud Bressoud, Thomas C. Bressoud

Tom Bressoud
Faculty  |  Computer Science, Mathematics
Associate Professor & Chair (Mathematics & Computer Science)
F.W. Olin Science Hall
211
740-587-5630
Service: 
2002-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Muskingum University; M.S. Boston University, M.S, Ph.D., Cornell University
Biography: 

Thomas Bressoud worked outside of academia both before and after receiving his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1996. Before his time in Ithaca, Dr. Bressoud spent 7 years working for MIT Lincoln Laboratory in real-time radar systems. After his Ph.D., Dr. Bressoud worked for a startup, Isis Distributed Systems, and, through the acquisition frenzy of the 90’s, was working for Lucent Technologies when he transferred to their research arm, Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, NJ.

In 2002, Dr. Bressoud joined the Denison faculty. He enjoys teaching courses across the undergraduate curriculum, from introductory courses exposing students from across campus to the fundamental ideas of computer science to upper level electives. In alignment with his research interests, he particularly enjoys teaching systems classes, like Networking and Operating Systems, and a special topics course in parallel programming and high performance systems.

Selected student research projects:

Research: 

My research interests are within the systems area of computer science and can be partitioned into the subareas of (i) fault-tolerance, (ii) networking and inter-domain routing, and (iii) high performance computing. Where possible, I enjoy the pursuit of research at the intersections of these areas. Within fault tolerance, I specialize in "minimally invasive" techniques of transforming non-fault-tolerant systems and protocols and legacy applications into fault-tolerant versions while minimizing impact on the application. In inter-domain routing I work in connection-oriented fault tolerant protocols and in load-balancing techniques for BGP, and in high performance computing, I study the performance of distributed (cluster) systems as we both scale and introduce failures into the system.

Selected publications:

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David Brest Brest, David Brest

Staff  |  Facilities Services
Building Services Assistant
Facilities Services
740-587-6264
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Holly Breymaier Breymaier, Holly Breymaier

Breymaier, Holly Breymaier
Staff  |  Career Exploration & Development
Program Coordinator
Burton D. Morgan Center
306
740-587-5522
Biography: 

Holly joined the Denison community as a member of the Athletic Department in March 2006. She transitioned into Career Services in June 2007 and is currently the Program Coordinator in Career Exploration and Development. As the Program Coordinator, Holly coordinates on-campus recruiting, manages online resources, maintains the Career Exploration & Development website, assists with the Denison Internship Program, and oversees the management of our data.

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Susan Britton Britton, Susan Britton

Susan Britton
Advisor  |  Religious & Spiritual Life
Director of Christian Education - Centenary United Methodist Church
740-587-0022
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Cody Brooks dr. Brooks, D. Cody Brooks

Faculty  |  Psychology
Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
410F
740-587-5683
Service: 
2000-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Gettysburg College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Vermont
Biography: 

Dr. Brooks came to Denison in 2000 and teaches courses in learning and conditioning, animal cognition, and related topics. His research interests focus on the basic learning and memory processes that influence treatment (e.g., of anxiety or substance abuse disorders) and the relapse of unwanted behaviors after treatment. He is interested in understanding those processes that can change behaviors motivated by emotions and/or biological need. He and his students have developed techniques for reducing and even eliminating some instances of relapse modeled in the laboratory. Some of Dr. Brooks' other interests include addiction, the history of psychology, and the role of diet and thought in mental health.

Research: 

Pavlovian Conditioning, Memory, Emotion, and Relapse

My research program involves basic research on the learning and memory processes that modulate emotionally- and motivationally- significant experiences, and the behaviors that accompany those experiences.  I am especially interested in the use of animal models to better understand the learning and memory processes that underlie instances of human relapse of problematic behaviors with emotional components (e.g., substance abuse, anxiety, depression).  Believe it or not, the methods of Pavlovian conditioning are uniquely suited to the study of these and any emotion-based behaviors.

Since Ivan P. Pavlov's time in Russia (circa 1890-1925), psychologists and other scientists have come to realize the fundamental importance of Pavlovian (classical) conditioning for the development of and change in many involuntary ("non-conscious" and other) responses experienced by humans and other animals.  These responses are the result of Pavlovian conditioning, and include heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory, and perspiration changes; emotional reactions like anxiety, fear, excitement, frustration; drug tolerance, withdrawal and craving; and motivational influences on many voluntary behaviors such as feeding, competition, reproduction, and pleasure-seeking activities, to name just a few.

An increasingly popular idea about Pavlovian conditioning is that it results in the formation of memories involving the events that are present in an organism's environment when they have emotionally-significant experiences.  My research focuses on what the content of those memories is, and what happens to those memories (e.g., how memorable they become) usually at some time after they have formed.  Sometimes various different memories can interact, and in some cases, the memory of a particular experience can be retrieved more or less well compared to other memories. This disparity in the ability to retrieve certain memories can produce dramatic changes in behavior.

My research is directed at three interrelated fronts:

  1. The study of animal models of relapse in humans.  One of the more interesting implications of our research here is that clinical relapses (of substance abuse, anxiety-disorders, depression, and so on) occur in part because crucial information learned during the treatment of a disorder is forgotten rather readily after the formal course of treatment ends (i.e., relapse is likely when a period of time has passed, or the setting changes, following treatment).  Using a model involving rats as subjects, my research has shown that laboratory instances of relapse can be reduced or eliminated by straightforward memory retrieval techniques.  (The implications of this research for human treatment are rather important.  Psychology has developed fairly good technologies for the treatment of common psychological disorders like anxiety and depression, but unfortunately, relapse rates post-treatment are disturbingly high.  More information is needed about why relapses occur, and how they can be minimized or completely prevented.) My students and I have found that the memory processes that underlie relapse and its reduction are similar in both aversive and appetitive motivational systems, i.e., when animals form initial memories about either "positive" or "negative" experiences.  One objective of our research is to continue to study the basic memory mechanisms that contribute to various types of relapse, and those that may contribute to reducing relapses.
  2. Our research has implications for a basic understanding of conditioning and memory involving important emotional events.  Some contemporary theories of conditioning and memory can explain the instances of relapse and their reduction that we have been studying intensively (e.g., hierarchical associative learning theories about occasion setting and contextual control).  Other theories cannot.  The theories that suggest explanations are relatively straightforward neural network models that can simulate many conditioning effects.  My students and I conduct ongoing tests of these theories using experimental designs that we hope will advance our understanding of not only the clinically-relevant relapse phenomena, but of the general memory processes involved in motivation & emotions.
  3. Recently, I have begun a project to study alcohol tolerance, withdrawal, and relapse, with the intention of influencing the probability or magnitude of craving-related responses and relapses that motivate an individual to resume alcohol use/abuse.  I believe this work has direct relevance to human substance abuse patterns.  There is always interest in determining whether learning and memory processes shown with nonhuman animals also apply to human experience, behavior, and memory.  I am beginning to investigate drug-use related relapse-like effects in human memory, with particular interest in discovering whether relapses might be reduced by reminder treatments analogous to those I've established with other methods.

I would be happy to talk with students about any aspect of these intriguing and challenging areas of research, and related topics.  Please contact me for questions or comments about my research program.

Publications

  • Brooks, D. C., Karamanlian, B. R., & Foster, V.. 2001. Extinction and spontaneous recovery of conditioned ethanol tolerance. Psychopharmacology. v. 153 p. 491-496
  • Brooks, D. C.. 2000. Recent and remote extinction cues reduce spontaneous recovery.. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. v. 53B( p. 25-58
  • Brooks, D. C., Palmatier, M. I., Garcia, E. O., & Johnson, J. L.. 1999. A retrieval cue for extinction reduces spontaneous recovery of a conditioned taste aversion. Animal Learning & Behavior. v. 27 p. 77-88
  • Wilson, A., Brooks, D. C., & Bouton, M. E.. 1995. The role of the rat hippocampal system in several effects of context in extinction. Behavioral Neuroscience. v. 109( p. 828-836.
  • Brooks, D. C., Hale, B., Nelson, J. B., & Bouton, M. E.. 1995. Reinstatement after counterconditioning. Animal Learning & Behavior. v. 23(4 p. 383-390
  • Brooks, D. C. & Bouton, M. E.. 1994. A retrieval cue for extinction attenuates response recovery (renewal) caused by a return to the conditioning context. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes. no. 20 p. 366-379
  • Bouton, M. E. & Brooks, D. C.. 1993. Time and context effects in a Pavlovian discrimination reversal. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes. v. 19 p. 165-179
  • Brooks, D. C. & Bouton, M. E.. 1993. A retrieval cue for extinction attenuates spontaneous recovery. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes. v. 19 p. 77-89
  • Brooks, D. C., & Bowker, J. L.. Further Evidence that Conditioned Inhibition is Not the Mechanism of an Extinction Cueâs Effect: A Reinforced Cue Prevents Spontaneous Recovery.. Animal Learning & Behavior.
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Sylvia Brown dr. Brown, Sylvia Anne Brown

Dr.Brown, Sylvia Anne Brown
Faculty  |  English
Assistant Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
301
740-587-5792
Service: 
1998-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Samford University; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University
Biography: 

Sylvia A.Brown earned her Ph.D. from Emory University, having specialized in Restoration and 18th-Century British Literature. She teaches and writes about 18th- and 19th-Century Literature, her specific interests including the origins of the novel, criminal narrative, Jane Austen, Disability Studies, and science fiction. She is currently working on a project exploring epistemology, the emergence of realist narrative, and conjuring in 18th- and 19th-century texts. Her recent essay, “Scripting Wholeness in Lucy Grealy's Autobiography of a Face,” appeared in the spring of 2008 in Criticism (Vol. 48).

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Marlaine Browning Browning, Marlaine Browning

Marlaine Browning
Staff  |  Queer Studies, Writing Center
Assistant Director of the Writing Center
Barney-Davis Hall
300
740-587-6206
Service: 
2006-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of Florida; M.F.A., Indiana University
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Christopher Bruhn dr. Bruhn, Christopher E. Bruhn

Christopher Bruhn
Faculty  |  Music, Queer Studies  |  Music History
Assistant Professor, Music History Coordinator
Burton Hall
108
740-587-8509
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison; M.A., Hunter College, CUNY; Ph.D., CUNY
Biography: 

Christopher Bruhn is Assistant Professor of Music History at Denison University. He holds the PhD in musicology from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he also received a certificate in American Studies. He has a Master of Arts degree in piano performance from Hunter College, CUNY, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in English literature from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Bruhn’s current research interests include 20th-century music in the United States and the intersections between music, literature, and philosophy, with particular focus on the music of Charles Ives and the philosophy of William James. In addition to music history survey courses, Dr. Bruhn teaches Music and Spirituality, Music and Sexuality, Globalization and Music, and The Aesthetics of Silence. Dr. Bruhn is also beginning research into aspects of musical life in Mexico.

Research: 

Publications include:

  • “The Transitive Multiverse of Charles Ives’s ‘Concord’ Sonata.” The Journal of Musicology 28, no. 2 (2011): 166-94.
  • “Signifyin(g) on the South: Interpreting Creamer and Layton’s ‘Dear Old Southland.’” In Music, American Made: Essays in Honor of John Graziano, ed. by John Koegel, 581-602. Detroit Monographs in Musicology/Studies in Music, no. 58. Sterling Heights, MI:  Harmonie Park Press, 2011.
  • “Between the Old World and the New: William Steinway and the New York Liederkranz.”  In European Music and Musicians in New York City, 1840-90, ed. by John Graziano, 135-48. Eastman Studies in Music. Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2006.
  • “Taking the Private Public: Amateur Music Making and the Musical Audience in 1860s New York.” American Music 21, no. 3 (2003): 260-290.
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Barb Bruner Bruner, Barbara Bowden Bruner

Staff  |  Education
Teacher Education Program Associate
Barney-Davis Hall
107A
740-587-6519
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Mark Evans Bryan ’96 dr. Bryan, Mark Evans Evans Bryan ’96

Mark Evans Bryan '96
Faculty  |  Theatre
Associate Professor
Theatre Arts Building - Ace Morgan Theatre
6
740-587-6260
Service: 
2002-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Denison University; A.M., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Mark Evans Bryan is a playwright and historian of theatre and culture in the U.S. eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. His scholarly work includes “‘Slideing into Monarchical extravagance’: Cato at Valley Forge and the Testimony of William Bradford, Jr.,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Series, 67.1; “A Femme Fatale of Eighteenth-Century American Theatre Research: Reading William Bradford’s Cato Letter,” Performing Arts Resources 28; “‘Crusade of Conquest’: Orientalist Surrogations in Manifest-Destinarian Theatre,” Journal of American Drama and Theatre 21.1; “The Rhetoric of Race and Slavery in an American Patriot Drama, John Leacock’s The Fall of British Tyranny,” JADT 12.3; “Yeoman and Barbarians: Popular Outland Caricature and American Identity,” Journal of Popular Culture 46.3; “Performing ‘Amerikee’: Rural Caricature and the George Washingtons of Percy MacKaye and Jacques Copeau,” “To Have and Have Not”: New Essays on Commerce and Capital in Modernist Theatre (McFarland 2011); and “American Drama, 1900-1915,” Companion to Twentieth-Century American Drama (Blackwell 2005).  “Middle True,” the first part of Dr. Bryan’s play cycle, Mercury Seven with Signs Following, was published in the Kenyon Review 26.1; the cycle has been performed in the U.S., Europe, and Asia.  His recent work includes a new stand-alone adaptation of the second part of the M7 cycle, Mud Nostalgia, which premiered at the Prague Fringe Festival in Prague, Czech Republic, in May 2011, under the direction of Bruce Hermann and performed by Sue Ott Rowlands (and subsequently toured Hungary and was performed in Sri Lanka and the U.S.) and his one-woman play, fig. 1, which premiered at the 2010 Prague Fringe Festival with designs by the celebrated Czech “action designer” and artist, Jaroslav Malina.  The Prague Post called fig. 1 “a play of romance and resignation, disillusionment and infatuation … intimate, gutsy, and ornately detailed”; Radmila Hrdinová was “enchanted” by the play, awarding it a rating of 9/10 in Právo.  As an actor, Dr. Bryan is most proud of his work with his long-time collaborator, filmmaker Andrew M. Hulse, including his performance in Hulse’s awarding-winning short film, Gasoline (2008).  Dr. Bryan is currently at work on a book project—on the Bradford family of eighteenth-century Philadelphia and popular culture in the U.S. middle colonies between 1755 and 1795—as well as on a new play, The Remotest Indies of This Living Earth, a not-especially-narrative piece set in mid-century Mexico City, Nixon-era southern Illinois, and in the present at the edge of the solar system.  He is also very proud to serve on the board of the for/word company. 

At Denison, Dr. Bryan teaches FYS 102 (“Humbug! Nineteenth-Century American Popular Entertainment”); THTR 100 (“Introduction to Theatre Studies”); THTR 170 (performance practicum); THTR 290 & 430 (playwriting); THTR 371-372-373-374 (the sequence in the history, literature, and theory of the theatre); and multiple versions of THTR 400 (junior/senior seminars on dramatic literature, theory of the theatre, and the history of theatre and culture), including “Theatre and the Early Republic, 1760-1860,” “Representing the Muslim World in British and American Drama,” “Modernism, Modernity, Theatre,” and seminars on vaudeville, minstrelsy, and popular theatre in the United States before the mid-twentieth century. Dr. Bryan is both an alumnus company member and the faculty advisor of Denison’s Burpee’s Seedy Theatrical Company, an improvisational performance group founded in 1979, purportedly the oldest of its kind on American university campuses; B.S.T.C. counts among its alumnae/i numerous theatre, television and film artists, including Steve Carell.

Dr. Bryan earned his Ph.D. in Theatre (history, literature and criticism) at the Ohio State University; his A.M. from the University of Chicago (the interdisciplinary Master of Arts Program in the Humanities); and his B.A. from Denison.

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Bryant Arts Center

Bryant Arts Center Building Icon
1904

Cleveland Hall has since been renovated to house the Art Department and provides studio space for painting, ceramics, sculpture, printmaking, photography and a small foundry for metal fabrication.

Emmett H. Buell Jr. dr. Buel Jr., Emmett H. H. Buell Jr.

Emmett H. Buell Jr.
Emeriti Faculty  |  Political Science
Professor Emeritus
Degree(s): 
B.A., M.A., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University
Biography: 
The first holder of the Richard G. Lugar Chair in Public Policy (2006-2009), Professor Buell retired from teaching at Denison at the end of the 2007-2008 academic year.  He also directed the Richard G. Lugar Program in Politics & Public Service from its inception in 1995 to the end of the 2008-09 academic year.  Under its auspices approximately 130 Denison students interned in House and Senate offices and seventeen former members of the U.S. House visited campus for class visits and meetings with students.  As holder of the Lugar Chair he helped arrange lectures by the late Richard Holbrooke and Ambassador Christopher Hill, chief U.S. negotiator in nuclear disarmament talks with North Korea and later the U.S. envoy to Iraq.
 
Buell received his PhD from Vanderbilt University in 1972 after earning his M.A. and B.A at Louisiana State University.  Except for 1980-81, spent as a visiting associate professor at Reed College, Buell taught his entire academic career at Denison after joining the faculty in fall 1969.
 
Now residing in Prescott, Arizona, Buell is working on a history of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, a project that so far has resulted in two summers of research in Washington, D.C. at the Senate Library, Senate Historical Office, National Archives, and Library of Congress.  His archival research also has taken him to the Lyndon B. Johnson Library at the University of Texas, the Bentley Library art the University of Michigan Ann Arbor, the Ohio State History Center, the Cline Library of Northern Arizona University.  The projected book will focus on five prominent chairmen of the Foreign Relations Committee: Charles Sumner, Henry Cabot Lodge, Arthur Vandenberg, J. William Fulbright, and Richard Lugar with particular emphasis on their interactions with the executive branch and SFRC members.
 
While at Denison Professor Buell offered courses mainly in American government and politics, specifically on political parties, presidential nominations and elections, and Congress.  Early in his Denison career he also offered courses on urban politics, public opinion, and political science methods.  He won national recognition in political science for published work on presidential nominating politics and negative campaigning in general elections for president. Of his four books, the most recent is Attack Politics: Negativity in Presidential Campaigns Since 1960 (University Press of Kansas, 2008) with Lee Sigelman.  A second, revised and updated edition of this work came out the following year in paperback with a new chapter on the 2008 election.  Additionally, he has contributed chapters to books edited by other political scientists, most notably on the “invisible primary” and the New Hampshire primary for In Pursuit of the Presidency collections edited by William G. Mayer.  His articles have appeared in the Journal of Politics, American Journal of Political Science, American Politics Quarterly, Urban Affairs Quarterly, Social Science Quarterly, and Journal of Law & Politics.  Buell also gained recognition in the discipline for extensive review essays on books about the presidential elections of 1984, 1992, 1996, 2000, and 2004 – all published in the Journal of Politics.  Many other book reviews by him have appeared in the American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and elsewhere.
 
Outside of the classroom, Buell led several political science classes to New Hampshire for close encounters with presidential aspirants during the primary season.  On numerous occasions a student or two accompanied him on drives from Granville to the Southwest, usually retracing the Santa Fe Trail with stops at historic sites, museums, national parks and campgrounds.  The high point of many of these trips was a grueling hike in New Mexico’s Bandelier National Monument replete with overnight wilderness camping.  In June 2007, Buell accompanied the Mt. Denison Expedition climbing team to Alaska, where he served as treasurer and trouble-shooter for the second successful ascent of a mountain named for the college.  Two months later, he summited Long’s Peak, the tallest mountain in Rocky Mountain National Park at over 14,000 feet.  Since retirement, with Matt Steinke (’08) he has scaled Humphrey’s Peak, the tallest mountain in Arizona at 12,600 feet; hiked 20 miles in the desert wildness to Keet Seel ruin in Navajo National Monument; explored and camped in Chiricahua National Monument; and completed many more hikes in the Prescott area.  Weather permitting, he regularly takes “Publius,” his golden retriever, up nearby Thumb Butte, a 3.5-mile hike featuring a steep elevation gain.
 
During his time at Denison, Buell worked out the gym most days of the week and played racquetball with a hundred or more students.  Several of these rivalries exceeded one hundred games:  185 with Neil Canfield ’06, 176 against Aaron Norton ’03, and 175 against James Dunson ’02).  In retirement Buell continues regular workouts at the Downtown Prescott Athletic Club.
 
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Steven Bujdoso Bujdoso, Steven Bujdoso

Staff  |  Facilities Services
Building Services Assistant
Facilities Services
740-587-6264
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Sally Bulford Bulford, Sally F. Bulford

Faculty  |  English, Environmental Studies, First-Year Program
Visiting Instructor
Barney-Davis Hall
319
740-587-5797
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Wittenberg University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
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Ted A. Burczak dr. Burczak, Theodore A. A. Burczak

Ted A. Burczak
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Professor
Higley Hall
207
740-587-6747
1997
1998
Service: 
1995-1997, 1998-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., SUNY at Binghamton; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to Macroeconomics, Economic Justice, Intermediate Macroeconomics, Monetary Theory, History of Economic Thought II

Curriculum Vitae: 
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Dave Burdick Burdick, David N. Burdick

Staff  |  Astronomy, Physics
Technical Assistant/Instrument Maker
F.W. Olin Science Hall
G07
740-587-6504
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Barb Burgess Burgess, Barbara J. Burgess

Staff  |  Facilities Services
Manager, Building Services
Facilities Services
740-587-6451
Service: 
1981-Present
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Burke Hall of Music & Art

Burke Hall of Music & Art Building Icon
1973

The hall contains a 255-seat recital hall, an orchestra rehearsal room, a "black box" theatre and a climate-controlled gallery space that is now home to the Denison Museum.

Tommy Burkett dr. Burkett, Tommy Burkett

Emeriti Faculty  |  English
Professor Emeritus
Degree(s): 
B.A., M.A., Rice University; Ph.D., University of Kansas
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Brett Burleson Burleson, Brett John Burleson

Brett Burleson
Faculty  |  Music  |  Jazz - Guitar
Studio Instructor (part-time)
Mulberry House
204
740-587-5656
Degree(s): 
B.M., Capital University
Biography: 

Guitarist Brett Burleson has performed and recorded in a diverse array of musical circumstances. He has played with jazz groups that range from big band to bebop to avant-garde free improvisation as well as rock, pop and blues bands. Standout performance experiences include over a dozen shows in 2008 and 2009 with Grammy nominated singer/songwriter Michelle Shocked and nightly performances for 6 months with an R&B group in Tenerife, Spain in 1999. He has performed in jazz clubs and festivals throughout the United States and continues to be an active member of the Central Ohio music community. 

As an educator, Mr. Burleson is on the faculties of Capital University Conservatory of Music (since 2002), Ohio Wesleyan University (since 2003), Denison University (since 2009) and The Ohio State University (since 2009).  He was also on faculty at Kenyon College from 2002-2008 where he taught guitar as well as directed the Kenyon College Jazz Ensemble. At Capital University he has directed the Fusion Band, Classical Guitar Ensemble and Guitar Workshop.

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Peter Burling Burling, Peter H. Burling

Burling, Peter H. Burling
Staff  |  Big Red Athletics
Head Tennis Coach
Mitchell Recreation and Athletics Center
226
740-587-6689
Service: 
1990-Present
Degree(s): 
U.S.P.T.A. Level 1
Biography: 

Peter Burling has served as the head men’s tennis coach since 1991 and the women’s tennis coach since 2000. Since his arrival Burling has helped the Big Red tennis programs rise among the elite in Division III Tennis. A multi-time national Coach of the Year and North Coast Athletic Conference Coach of the Year, Burling is one a select number of college tennis coaches with over 600 career victories.

In 2008 Burling and the Big Red women broke through with an appearance in the NCAA Semifinals that resulted in a third-place national finish. The team posted a 22-4 record that season. In addition, after the conclusion of the team championship, the duo of Marta Drane and Kristin Cobb finished as the national runner-up in the NCAA Division III Doubles Championship.  In 2004 Burling received the ITA National Coach of the Year award and the following season the USPTA honored Burling as its National Coach of the Year.  Two players, Meridith Sulser in 2005 and Cobb in 2011, were honored by the ITA with its prestigious Arthur Ashe Jr. Sportsmanship and Leadership Award. In 2009 Meghan Damico received the ITA Senior Player of the Year award.

At the conference level, the women’s program has won more conference championships than any other program since the creation of the NCAC in 1984. As the coach of the men’s team since 1991, Burling and the Big Red have won over 300 matches. Six players have been named the conference’s Player of the Year and Burling has won NCAC Men’s Coach of the Year on seven occasions. Eleven players, most recently Tom Cawood in 2012, have earned All-America honors under Burling. A native of Orleans, Mass., Burling has been a USPTA Level I Professional for nearly 40 years and currently resides in Granville with his wife Patricia. He has two sons, Scott and Colin.

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Lori Burrows Burrows, Lori Burrows

Burrows, Lori Burrows
Staff  |  Annual Fund
Assistant Director of the Annual Fund
Burton D. Morgan Center
503
740-587-6631
Service: 
2006-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Bluffton University
Biography: 

Lori earned a B.A. in business administration from Bluffton University. She is responsible for the Class Agent Program, fifth and tenth Reunion Committees, G.O.L.D. leadership giving, and the Big Red Society. Lori has worked in advancement since 2003 and joined the Denison community in 2006. She previously managed the student calling program and senior class gift committees in the Annual Fund Office.

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Burton D. Morgan Center

Burton Morgan Building Icon
2003

A variety of academic and administrative functions, including: the Career Development Center; a faculty lounge; offices for Alumni Affairs, Institutional Advancement, and Organizational Studies; and a host of technology-rich classrooms and seminar

Burton Hall

Burton Hall Building Icon
1888

Burton currently houses the Music Department.

Damon Bush Bush, Damon Bush

Staff  |  Facilities Services
Engineering Maintenance
Facilities Services
740-587-6264
Service: 
2014-Present
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Jason Busic Busic, Jason Busic

Busic, Jason Busic
Faculty  |  Modern Languages, Spanish
Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
301N
740-587-6464
Service: 
2012-Present
Degree(s): 
M.A., Ohio University; Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Jason Busic studies medieval and early modern Iberia with a focus on cultural studies. His principal area of investigation focuses on intellectual and ideological engagement between Christians and Muslims. Professor Busic especially enjoys exploring themes of identity and culture in class with his students and the connections between the pre-modern and contemporary worlds.

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Dave Bussan ’81 Bussan, David Robert Bussan ’81

Faculty  |  Cinema
Associate Professor
Cinema House
107
740-587-6234
Service: 
1987-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Denison University; M.F.A., California Institute of the Arts
Biography: 

David Bussan, Associate Professor of Cinema, began teaching at the college in 1987 and served as Chair of the department from 1998 to 2011. He teaches a range of production courses in 16mm film and digital video. He holds a Master of Fine Arts in Film/Video from the California Institute of the Arts and a Bachelor of Arts in Cinema from Denison University.

Professor Bussan's portfolio of creative film includes works in documentary, memoir, narrative, and experimental films. He recently completed a short documentary entitled Future Visions of Over the Rhine, which explores the economic revival and gentrification of this poverty-stricken downtown Cincinnati neighborhood. His current work-in-progress is Art Bomb!, a documentary concerning Ohio artist Charles Van Ness and his uniquely stylized sculptures.

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Cindy Butler Butler, Cynthia S. Butler

Staff  |  Office & Mail Services
Mail Services Coordinator
Doane Administration
005A
740-587-6796
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Rodney Butt Butt, Rodney Butt

Staff  |  Big Red Athletics
Head Men's Golf Coach
Mitchell Recreation and Athletics Center
166
740-587-8643
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
PGA Professional
Biography: 

Rodney Butt has been the head men’s golf coach since 2010 and a part of the men’s golf program since 2003. Butt served as the assistant men’s golf coach at Denison from 2003 through 2010 and is also the Director of Golf at Granville Golf Course which is the home of the Denison men's golf team. In his first season as an assistant with the Big Red, Denison received their second consecutive NCAA Division III Championship Tournament invitation and the team went on to a 14th place national finish.

Prior to his seven seasons as the assistant coach at Denison, Butt spent 14 years as the head men’s golf coach at Granville High School where he led the Blue Aces to nine consecutive Mid-State League titles between 1991-99. During that span, Granville posted a 232-5 record. He coached Granville to a state runner-up finish in 1995 before breaking through with the school’s first state championship in any sport in 1996.  Butt is a nine-time MSL coach of the year, a three-time Central District coach of the year and was tabbed the Newark Advocate Coach of the Year for Golf, seven times. He has also been an active member of the PGA of America since 1985.

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James S. Cameron dr. Cameron, James S. S. Cameron

Emeriti Faculty  |  Computer Science, Mathematics
Professor Emeritus
Degree(s): 
B.S., Ohio State University; M.S., Stanford University; Ph.D., Ohio State University
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Campus Hangouts

Campus Hangouts

Slayter Student Union, The Bandersnatch, and The Roost are among the favorite Denison places to hang out with friends, read a book, listen to live music, and grab a cup of coffee or something to eat.

Campus Leadership & Involvement

Campus Leadership & Involvement Center

P.O. Box 810, Granville, OH 43023 (USPS Only)
740-587-6394
Slayter 310

The Campus Leadership & Involvement Center (CLIC) provides co-curricular learning opportunities that foster personal growth, including critical thinking and values-based decision-making. Above all, we help students to embrace ethical leadership and lifelong learning while promoting a sense of community and a purposeful connection to Denison.

Campus Services

Campus Services

P.O. Box 810, Granville, OH 43023 (USPS Only)
740-587-5730
Slayter 200

Denison Campus Services offers a wide variety of services for students, faculty and staff, including facilities reservations, equipment rental, shuttle transportation, and visiting faculty and department guest accommodations.

Jose Manuel Cañibano Cañibano, Jose Manuel Cañibano

Faculty  |  Modern Languages
Visiting Assistant Professor
740-587-6643
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., B.A., Universidad de Valladolid, Spain; Ph.D. candidate, University of Kentucky
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Mike Caravana Caravana, Michael Caravana

Mike Caravana
Faculty, Staff  |  Athletic Training, Big Red Athletics
Assistant Professor
Mitchell Recreation and Athletics Center
RG25
740-587-6590
Service: 
2008-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., University of Virginia; M.S.F., U.S. Sports Academy
Biography: 

Michael Caravana has been the head men’s lacrosse coach at Denison on two separate occasions. He began at Denison in 1990 and coached the team until 2005.  He would return three years later and resume his post.  Under Caravana’s direction Denison men’s lacrosse has become one of the elite programs in all of NCAA Division III. A 1983 graduate of the University of Virginia, Caravana was a four-time All-American attackman for the Cavaliers. He earned a bachelor's degree in education and was a captain during his senior season. Caravana led Virginia in scoring three times and in assists all four seasons.

Following graduation, Caravana spent two seasons as an assistant coach at Brown University, then returned to Virgina., where he served as assistant head coach under Jim "Ace" Adams before accepting the head coaching position at Denison in the fall of 1990. In 1998, Caravana earned his master's degree in sport management from the United States Sports Academy. Caravana ranks second in all-time victories at Denison, trailing only his predecessor, Ferris "Tommy" Thomsen, Jr., who guided DU to 255 wins over the course of 25 seasons (1966-1990). In 1994 he was named the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association’s Division III Coach of the Year. He has also been the recipient of the NCAC Coach of the Year award on multiple occasions.  In 2003 he began a four-year commitment as the assistant coach for the United States lacrosse national team which earned a silver medal at the 2006 International Lacrosse Federation World Championships.

He is a member of the Charlottesville Chapter Lacrosse Hall of Fame, the Ohio Lacrosse Foundation Hall of Fame and the Long Island Metro Chapter Lacrosse Hall of Fame.

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