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Fran Lopez-Martin dr. Lopez-Martin, Francisco J. Lopez-Martin

Dr.Lopez-Martin, Francisco J. Lopez-Martin
Faculty  |  Modern Languages, Spanish, Latin American & Caribbean Studies
Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
301S
740-587-6463
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Universidad de Huelva; M.A., University of Western Ontario; Ph.D., Duke University
Biography: 

Francisco Javier L„pez-MartÍn teaches Spanish literature and language, critical theory and writing at Denison University. His specialty area is 16th and 17th Hispanic Transatlantic Literature and History with emphasis in the representation of time, space and the dynamics of power between America and Spain. He is also interested in European Humanism during the 16th century and in Spanish Golden Age Theatre.

He teaches middle and upper level classes of Hispanic literature, with a Transatlantic approach, focusing on representation, aesthetics and critical thinking. He also teaches upper level courses on Transatlantic Studies, exposing the struggles of power during American Conquest and analyzing the complexity of the encounter between Europeans and Americans in the 16th century. In addition to these courses, Francisco teaches language courses and a writing workshop in Spanish.

Francisco has recently published –Violencia, neoplatonismo y aristotelismo en La Aurora en Copacabana” and –Complejidad e hipertextualidad en el teatro barroco: Calder„n y sor Juana”. His book entitled Representaciones del tiempo y construcci„n de la identidad entre Espa_a y Am_rica (1580-1700) will be published by Universidad de Huelva in September, 2011.

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Melanie Lott ’04 Lott, Melanie Lott ’4

Melanie Lott '04
Faculty  |  Astronomy, Physics
Assistant Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
740-587-8636
Degree(s): 
B.S., Denison University; M.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College
Biography: 

I enjoy teaching courses across the spectrum of the physics curriculum including introductory physics, mechanics, electronics, modern physics, and the advanced experimental laboratory. In addition to working with students in the classroom setting, I enjoy involving students in my research lab.

I am a biomechanist who works on the whole body level, using principles of classical mechanics to better understand how the human body moves. I am particularly interested in dance biomechanics, which is a relatively new field. My research is interdisciplinary in nature, combining physics, anatomy, and the art of dance. In general I am interested in connections between science and the arts and enjoy finding ways for the two seemingly disconnected worlds to intermingle.

Research: 

Currently my research group investigates how dancers regain balance while spinning in a multiple-turn pirouette. We collect motion capture data of dancers with a multi-camera system to track the positions and orientations of the dancers’ body segments and center of mass throughout the pirouette. We also create a model of the dancer to simulate the pirouette based on theoretical mechanics. Our model can also be used to compute the musculoskeletal forces involved in executing the movement. One of the main goals of our research is to determine if expert dancers utilize a particular adjustment strategy to successfully regain balance while rotating on one foot.

In the past I have also done projects on biomechanics of athletics and even non-human movement (horse jumping). I enjoy collaborating with people across many disciplines.

Selected publications:

  • K. Laws and M. Lott, “Resource Letter PoD-1: The Physics of Dance,” American Journal of Physics 81, 7 (2013).
  • M. Lott and K. Laws, “The Physics of Toppling and Regaining Balance during a Pirouette,” Journal of Dance Medicine and Science 16, 167 (2012).
  • M. Cluss, K. Laws, N. Martin, T.S. Nowicki, and A. Mira, The Indirect Measurement of Biomechanical Forces in the Moving Human Body,” American Journal of Physics 74, 102 (2006).
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Lew Ludwig dr. Ludwig, Lewis D. Ludwig

Dr.Ludwig, Lewis D. Ludwig
Faculty  |  Computer Science, Mathematics
Associate Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
210
740-587-5638
Service: 
2002-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., B.A., M.E., College of Mount St. Joseph; M.S., Miami University; Ph.D., Ohio University
Biography: 

Lew Ludwig joined the Denison faculty in 2002.  Prior to this, he had visiting positions at Miami University and Kenyon College.  He earned his doctorate at Ohio University under his advisor A. V. Arhangelskii, a Master’s Degree in Mathematics at Miami University and a Master’s in Education from the College of Mount St. Joseph.  Dr. Ludwig has taught a variety of classes at Denison including FYS 102, Math 121, Math 122, Math 123, Math 124, Math 231, Math 210, Math 321/322 and Math 400 Knot Theory.  He also teaches Math 215 Technically Speaking.  In recent years, Dr. Ludwig has adopted the “flip classroom” format where students engage in the material before coming to class.  In 2013, he was awarded the Distinguished Teaching Award from the Ohio Section of the Mathematical Association of America.

Selected student research projects:

  • Joseph Paat (’11) and Erica Evans (’11), An infinite family of knots whose mosaic number is realized in non-reduced projections, won best presentation at MathFest 2010.
  • Joseph Paat (’11) and Jacob Shapiro (’10), Tabulating knot mosaics, won best presentation at JMM 2010 Poster Session.
  • Sam Behrend (’09), Linking in straight-edge embeddings of K9, won best presentation at MathFest 2008 and JMM 2009 Poster Session.
  • Rachel Grotheer (’08) Linking in straight-edge embeddings of K8, won best presentation at MathFest 2007 and JMM 2008 Poster Session.
  • Colleen Hughes (’06) Linking in straight-edge embeddings of K6, won best presentation at MathFest 2004 and JMM 2005 Poster Session.
Research: 

Dr. Ludwig was trained as a point-set topologist and continues work in this field looking at separation and convergence-type problems.  In order to include undergraduates in his work, Dr. Ludwig expanded his research to include knot theory, a branch of topology.  Since 2005, Dr. Ludwig has worked with nine undergraduate students on seven different research projects.  Combined, his students have won 11 national awards with cash prizes totaling over $1000, for the quality of their work and presentations.  Dr. Ludwig is happy to advise summer research students in any area of knot theory.  He and his students have been very successful with the two hands-on topics of stick knots and knot mosaics, producing four peer-reviewed publications.

Selected publications:

  • An infinite family of knots whose mosaic number is realized in non-reduced projections (with Erica Evans (’11) and Joe Paat (’11)), Journal of Knot Theory and its Ramifications, 22:7, 2013
  • Linking in straight-edge embeddings of K7 (with Pameila Arbisi (’07)), Journal of Knot Theory and its Ramifications, 19:11, pp. 1431-1447, 2010.
  • Dowker Spaces Revisited (with Nyikos and Porter), Tsukuba Journal of Mathematics 34:1, pp. 1-11. 2010
  • When graph theory meets knot theory (with Foisy), Contemporary Mathematics 479, pp. 67–85, 2009
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Leslie Maaser dr. Maaser, Leslie Goldman Maaser

Leslie Maaser
Faculty  |  Music  |  Flute
Flute Ensemble Instructor, Studio Instructor
Burton Hall
203
740-587-5656
Service: 
2002-Present
Degree(s): 
B.M., Michigan State University; M.M., University of Wisconsin-Madison; D.M.A., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Leslie Goldman Maaser, D.M.A.  is the Affiliate Studio Instructor of Flute at Denison University as well as the Director of the Denison University Flute Ensemble.  She is the Principal Flutist of the Newark-Granville Symphony Orchestra, where she also serves as Chairperson of the Orchestra Committee and Education Director.   In January 2008, she was a featured soloist with the orchestra. 

Dr. Maaser is a founding member of the Columbus Camerata Woodwind Quintet, and flutist/piccoloist with Ohio Capital Winds.   In 2007, the Columbus Camerata was featured at the Ohio Music Education Association Convention for their clinic/performance on new woodwind quintet literature, and as guest artists at a featured recital at Fayetteville State University in North Carolina. 

Leslie has been a member of the Columbus Bach Ensemble, the Welsh Hills Symphony Orchestra, and has performed with the Opera Columbus’ Light Opera Orchestra, and the Columbus Symphony.  She has also performed with the Opera Theatre of Rochester (NY), Madison (WI) Symphony Orchestra, Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, the Rome Festival Orchestra, and the East Lansing Opera Company.  She has performed as a soloist and served as a clinician throughout the midwest, including as a featured soloist  with the Welsh Hills Symphony Orchestra,  Columbus Bach Ensemble, Wright State University Chamber Orchestra, Wright State University Wind Ensemble, Greece Symphony Orchestra (NY), as well as at the Ohio Music Education Association Conference, Ohio Wesleyan University, the Chamber Music Connection, Denison University’s Contemporary Music Festival, Central Ohio’s Contemporary Music Festival, the University of Iowa, University of Northern Iowa, Schoolcraft College, State University of New York at Brockport, and Indiana State University. 

As a research competition winner of the National Flute Association, Dr. Maaser was selected to present and perform excerpts of her doctoral thesis at the 2002 National Flute Convention in Washington, D.C., and was selected for publication in the 2002 summer issue of the Flutist Quarterly.  She performed the U.S. premiers of Elizabeth Raum’s Aegean Perspective at the 2000 National Flute Convention in Columbus, Ohio.  Leslie also performed as a competition winner with the National Flute Association Professional Flute Choir at the National Flute Convention

Leslie’s major teachers are Katherine Borst Jones, Ervin Monroe, Robert Cole, and Israel Borouchoff.  In addition, she has studied with prominent artists such as Peter Lloyd, former Principal Flutist of the London Symphony, and Walfrid Kujala, Professor of Flute at Northwestern University and Piccolo Emeritus of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.  Leslie has performed in master classes of flute icons such as Jean-Pierre Rampal and Jeanne Baxtresser.  She holds a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in flute performance from The Ohio State University.  As a fellowship recipient, she earned her Master of Music degree from the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and her Bachelor of Music degree from Michigan State University.  Leslie Maaser was formerly on the music faculties of Wright State University, Mt. Vernon Nazarene College, Valparaiso University, Luther College, and has taught at The Ohio State University both as a graduate assistant as well as a sabbatical replacement for Professor Katherine Borst Jones.  

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Robert Loren Mack Mack, Robert Loren Loren Mack

Robert Loren Mack
Faculty  |  Communication
Visiting Assistant Professor
Higley Hall
401B
(740) 587-62
Degree(s): 
B.A. Northern Arizona University: M.A. Colorado State University; ABD The University of Texas at Austin (2015)
Biography: 

Robert Mack is currently concluding his PhD in Communication Studies with an emphasis in Rhetoric & Language at the University of Texas at Austin. He is generally interested in studying the text-audience interface in U.S. American popular culture, and he draws widely on rhetorical, reception, critical, and psychoanalytic approaches in order to analyze this relationship. His research and teaching in communication contemplate the role of audience subjectivity and agency in an increasingly mediated social landscape.

Robert's research focuses on topics like authorship, fandom, scandal, and the relationship between the individual and the cultural imaginary. His dissertation sketches the contours of a “rhetoric of projective identification” and considers how this rhetorical mode operates within the context of television reception. Other recent projects have analyzed peculiar patterns in contemporary media (including images of maternal torment and narratives of terminally ill artistic geniuses) for the ways in which these patterns crystalize widespread social anxieties. A special subset of his work revisits notable media phenomena from the past (the original broadcast of The Twilight Zone, the 1992 premiere of The Crying Game, the break of the 1950s quiz show scandals) in order to reevaluate related texts from new perspectives. 

Robert is also co-author of Critical Media Studies (2nd ed). At Dennison he teaches Public Address and Argumentation.

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Diana Mafe Mafe, Diana A. Mafe

Diana Mafe
Faculty  |  English, Black Studies, International Studies, Women’s Studies
Assistant Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
306
740-587-6237
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., McMaster University; M.A., University of Guelph; Ph.D., McMaster University
Biography: 

Diana Adesola Mafe teaches postcolonial literatures with an emphasis on contemporary Anglophone African literatures. She also teaches African American literatures and courses in Women’s Studies. Her work tracks the literary and cinematic roles of and for women of color in African and American discourses. She has published articles in Research in African Literatures, American Drama, English Academy Review, Frontiers, Safundi, Camera Obscura, and African Women Writing Resistance. Her book, Mixed Race Stereotypes in South African and American Literature: Coloring Outside the (Black and White) Lines (Palgrave Macmillan 2013), examines the literary stereotype of the “tragic mulatto” from a transnational perspective.

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Regina Martin Martin, Regina Martin

Faculty  |  English
Assistant Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
740-587-5773
Biography: 

Regina Martin earned her Ph.D. in English from the University of Florida (2010). Her research focuses on 19th- and 20th-century British literature, the history and theory of the novel, and critical and literary theory. She is currently working on a book manuscript that examines British modernism as a historical moment of financial crisis very much like our own. Her scholarly work has appeared in The Eighteenth-Century Novel, Twentieth-Century Literature, and Criticism.

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Tristen Martin Martin, Tristen Martin

Faculty  |  Security, Safety & Risk Management
Security Monitor
Burton D. Morgan Center
Parking Garage
740-587-6482
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Jonathan Maskit dr. Maskit, Jonathan Maskit

Jonathan Maskit
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Visiting Assistant Professor & Director of (Philosophy, Politics & Economics)
Blair Knapp Hall
205K
740-587-5641
2001
2002
Service: 
1997-2001, 2002-Present
Degree(s): 
A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University
Biography: 

Assistant Professor Jonathan Maskit joined the faculty at Denison in 1996. He earned an A.B. from Vassar College and an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University.

Jonathan Maskit teaches courses in aesthetics, continental philosophy, environmental philosophy, the history of philosophy, and others. His research focuses on the relationship between culture, nature, and art drawing particularly on the work of Kant, Heidegger, and Deleuze and Guattari. He is currently working on a book on this theme and has published articles and reviews in Research in Philosophy and Technology, Philosophy & Geography, Ethics, and Canadian Philosophical Reviews. He has also contributed to a number of edited volumes and has seen some of his work anthologized. He has been a visiting scholar at the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium) and the University of Potsdam (Germany) and has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, The Belgian-American Educational Foundation, and The Global Partners Project. He serves as the Reviews Editor for Ethics, Place, & Environment.

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Sandra Mathern-Smith Mathern-Smith, Sandra Mathern-Smith

Sandra Mathern-Smith
Faculty  |  Dance, Environmental Studies
Professor
Doane Dance Building
103
740-587-6713
Service: 
1988-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Portland State University; M.F.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison
Biography: 

Sandra Mathern-Smith has been dancing and choreographing for thirty-years and is committed to working collaboratively with improvisation as a performance form. She has had the pleasure of performing and collaborating with veteran improvisers such as Peter Bingham, Karen Nelson, K. J. Holmes, Chris Aiken, and David Beadle, as well as Butoh artist Katsura Kan. Her study of improvisation, including the forms Contact Improvisation, Authentic Movement, and Ensemble Thinking, has been with artist/teachers Danny Lepkoff, Nancy Stark Smith, Julyen Hamilton, Andrew Harwood, Nina Martin, Deborah Hay, and Barbara Dilley. Her work, focusing on collaboration, improvisation, and interdisciplinary projects, has incorporated video-projected backdrops, live music, poetic text, set designs, while working with artists of many disciplines. Contained, an installation piece created for solo performer involving 4 large moving screens with projected imagery and a voice activated environment, was presented at Dartington College, England (2006).

Artist Residencies at the Camac Centre D’Art, France (2012), and at the Atlantic Center for the Arts under Wally Cardona (2010), contributed to the development of her recent works Swimming in Green and I am Relative to You. She was awarded an artist Fellow at the Hambidge Center for the Arts (GA) and was a semi-finalist for the Headlands Center for the Arts residency program (CA). Recently, her work was presented at the Conduit Dance Guest Series (OR), the Texas Dance Improvisation Festival, the RAD Festival (MI), and at the Nomad Express International Multi-Arts Festival in Burkina Faso, West Africa (2014), where she was featured as a Guest Artist, Teacher, and Mentor.

Sandra received an Individual Excellence Award in Choreography from the Ohio Arts Council (2010), has twice received an Ohio Individual Artist Fellowship in Choreography (1993, 1996), and has been awarded over 25-grants for her work from the Ohio Arts Council, Arts Midwest, Target Foundation, Greater Columbus Arts Council (OH), Wisconsin Arts Board, and the Portland Metropolitan Arts Commission (OR), among others. She is a Professor at Denison University, Department of Dance, Granville, OH, where since 1988 she has taught courses in modern/postmodern technique, improvisation, performance, choreography, production, and collaborative art courses employing technology (Isadora, video, and sound). She received her BA from Portland State University and MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Nestor Matthews dr. Matthews, Nestor Matthews

Nestor Matthews
Faculty  |  Neuroscience, Psychology
Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
410C
740-587-5782
Service: 
2001-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Psychology (1993), Fairleigh Dickinson University; M.Sc., Psychology (1995), Brown University; Ph.D., Psychology, (1997), Brown University; Post-doctoral Fellows, Neurobiology & Behavior, (2001), Columbia University.
Biography: 

Dr. Matthews joined the faculty at Denison in 2001 after completing a four-year post-doctoral fellowship in the Center for Neurobiology & Behavior at Columbia University.  He teaches Sensation & Perception, Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences, Research Methods, and Introduction to Psychology. Seminars he has offered include “Perceptual Learning and Brain Plasticity”, “The Cognitive Neuroscience of Music”, “Ruining Humor with Science”, “Neuroscience and the Liberal Arts”, and “NERDs Without Borders”. His research addresses issues in human vision and audition, with an emphasis on how these sensory systems improve with training.

Research: 

Peer Reviewed Journal Articles With Denison Student Co-Authors

9. Matthews N, Welch, L., Festa, E.K., & Clement, A. (2013). Remapping Time Across Space. Journal of Vision. 13(8):2, 1-15. [PubMed]

8. Matthews N, Vawter, M, & Kelly, J, 2012. Right Hemifield Deficits in Judging Simultaneity: A Perceptual Learning Study. Journal of Vision. 12(2):1, 1-14. [PubMed]

7. Kelly J, & Matthews N, 2011. Attentional Oblique Effect When Judging Simultaneity. Journal of Vision. 11(6):10, 1-15. [PubMed]

6. Reardon K, Kelly J, & Matthews N, 2009. Bilateral Attentional Advantage on Elementary Visual Tasks. Vision Research. 49(7), 692-702. [PubMed]

5. Strong K, Kurosawa K, & Matthews N, 2006. Hastening Orientation Sensitivity. Journal of Vision. 6(5), 661-670. [PubMed]

4. Matthews N, Rojewski A, & Cox J, 2006. The time course of the oblique effect in orientation judgments. Journal of Vision. 5(3), 202-214. [PubMed]

3. Matthews N, & Allen J, 2005. The role of speed lines in subtle direction judgments. Vision Research. 45(12), 1629-1640. [PubMed]

2. Saffell T, & Matthews N, 2003. Task-specific perceptual learning on speed and direction discrimination. Vision Research. 43(12), 1365-1374. [PubMed]

1. Stanley R, & Matthews N, 2003.  Invalid cues impair auditory motion sensitivity. Perception. 32(6), 731-740. [PubMed]

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Arturo Matute Castro Matute Castro, Arturo Matute Castro

Faculty  |  Modern Languages
Visiting Assistant Professor
740-587-6643
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
M.A., Hispanic Linguistics, Facultad de Artes y Letras, Universidad de la Habana, La Habana, Cuba
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Michael Mayne Mayne, Michael Mayne

Faculty  |  English
Visiting Assistant Professor
740-587-6207
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., M.A., M.A., State University of New York at Brockport; Ph.D., University of Florida
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Andy McCall McCall, Andrew Christopher McCall

Andy McCall
Faculty  |  Biology, Environmental Studies
Associate Professor
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
317/lab 521
740-587-8554
Service: 
2006-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Carleton College; M.S., Ph.D., University of California, Davis
Biography: 

I'm a plant evolutionary ecologist with special interests in pollination biology and plant-herbivore interactions. I also am interested in how insect phenology is affected by climate change. I am a big fan of field work and have study sites in Ohio, Arizona, and California. During the Ohio winters, I use manipulative experiments in the greenhouse to answer some of my questions (especially # 2 below).

Research: 

My current research questions are:

  1. Does variability in herbivore pressure over time affect the evolution of induced resistance in wild radish?
  2. How and why do florivores (things that eat flowers) choose what flowers to eat?
  3. How does florivory affect pollination and fitness in sacred Datura, Datura wrightii, in Arizona?
  4. What factors are affecting butterfly species richness and diversity in Northern California?

Recent publications

  • McCall, A.C., J.A. Fordyce. 2010. Can optimal defense theory be used to predict the distribution of plant chemical defenses? Journal of Ecology 98: 985-992.
  • McCall, A.C. 2010. Does dose-dependent petal damage affect pollen limitation in a California annual plant? Botany 88: 601-606.
  • Forister, M.L., A.C. McCall, N. J. Sanders, J. A. Fordyce, J.H. Thorne, J. O’Brien, D.P. Waetjen, and A.M. Shapiro. 2010. Thirty years of climate change and habitat alteration shift patterns of butterfly diversity. Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, USA 107: 2088-2092.
  • McCall, A.C. 2008. Florivory affects pollinator visitation and female fitness in Nemophila menziesii. Oecologia 155: 729-737.
  • Past and current lab members (Senior theses titles are given when appropriate):
  • Monique Brown, 2009, worked on how and if past herbivory affects resistance in wild radish
  • Josh Drizin, 2009, worked on pollination biology in Echinacea angustifolia
  • Stephen Murphy, 2009, Thesis: “The effects of induction on petal palatability in radish”
  • Jameson Pfeil, 2009, worked on pollination and seed predation in Echinacea angustifolia
  • Colin Venner, 2009, Thesis: “How does pollinator activity affect fitness in Echinacea angustifolia?
  • Heather Robertson, 2010, Thesis: “Does petal color affect florivores in wild radish?”
  • Caitlin Splawski, 2010, Thesis: “Plant recruitment in a restored prairie in Ohio”
  • Luke Avery, 2011, working on why butterfly communities change over time in California
  • Grant Adams, 2011, Thesis: “Does variation in herbivore pressure affect the evolution of inducible resistance in wild radish?”
  • Kelsy Espy, 2011, Thesis: “Does leaf damage induce resistance in wild radish flowers?”
  • Brian Jackson, 2011, Thesis: “How do abiotic factors affect succession on Mt. St. Helens?”
  • Eric Thomson, 2011, Thesis: “Floral visitors and florivory in Datura wrightii
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Lisa McDonnell dr. McDonnell, Lisa James McDonnell

Faculty  |  English
Associate Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
314
740-587-6401
Service: 
1982-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Connecticut College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Biography: 

Lisa McDonnell teaches courses in Renaissance literature (especially Shakespeare and Renaissance drama) and modern and contemporary drama. Her publications and conference presentations have been primarily in these fields and in feminist pedagogy; her current research focuses on shrew taming in Early Modern England. She is also completing work on interviews with Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, Tony Kushner, and noted British and American playwrights, Arnold Wesker and Jeffrey Hatcher. Recently, she has served as Denison University's Exchange Fellow with Advanced Studies in England, affiliated with University College, Oxford.

While in England, she conducted research on shrew taming and taught a seminar on the drama of Shakespeare and Webster in three interesting venues: Hall's Croft (Shakespeare's daughter's house), Stratford-upon-Avon; Lord Nelson's house, Bath; and University College, Oxford. She has won a number of awards, including the Folger Institute Fellowship (she was one of five scholars chosen from the United States to study with members of England's Royal Shakespeare Company), a National Endowment for the Humanities Research Grant, a Mellon Foundation Grant for Teaching with Technology, and the Earl Hartsell Award for Excellence in Teaching.

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Cheryl Kennedy McFarren McFarren, Cheryl Kennedy McFarren

McFarren, Cheryl Kennedy McFarren
Faculty  |  Theatre
Assistant Professor
Theatre Arts Building - Ace Morgan Theatre
2
740-587-8615
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of California, Berkeley; M.F.A., National Theatre Conservatory; Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder
Biography: 

Dr. McFarren holds an M.F.A. in acting from the National Theatre Conservatory in Denver, as well as a Ph.D. in Theatre from the University of Colorado at Boulder. She specializes in the teaching of acting, with an emphasis on teaching the performance of heightened language. She is a member of Actors Equity Association, and has worked professionally since the age of 18.  Recent years have seen her perform with the Berkeley and Colorado Shakespeare Festivals, the Denver Center Theatre Company, Germinal Stage (Denver), the Commonweal Theatre Company (Lanesboro, MN), the Creede Repertory Theatre (Creede, CO), and the Bread Loaf Acting Ensemble (Ripton, VT).

She lives in Granville with her husband, artist Mathew McFarren, son, and two impudent dogs.

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Pat McGonagle McGonagle, Patrick David McGonagle

Faculty  |  Economics
Visiting Instructor (part-time)
Higley Hall
401A
740-587-5623
Service: 
2005-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Accounting Survey

Outside Interests: Controller for the Energy Cooperative

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John McHugh dr. McHugh, John W. McHugh

John McHugh
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Visiting Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
201l
740-587-5897
Service: 
2011-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Providence College; Ph.D., Boston University
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Sonya L. McKay dr. McKay, Sonya Lee L. McKay

Sonya L. McKay
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry
Associate Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
118
740-587-6363
Service: 
2000-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Kenyon College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
Biography: 

Sonya L. McKay, a biophysical organic chemist, is interested in research using NMR and nonnatural amino acids to understand how the molecular level interactions dictated by the primary structure of peptides and proteins influence secondary and tertiary structures and protein folding. She is also investigating the synthesis of a chemically acylated collagen protein for its use as a drug delivery vehicle. 

Research: 

Field of Interest: Investigation of biologically important molecules including peptides and collagen using solid phase peptide synthesis and NMR.

Curriculum Vitae: 
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May Mei dr. Mei, May Mei

May Mei
Faculty  |  Computer Science, Mathematics
Assistant Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
204
740-587-6248
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of California, Berkeley; M.S., Ph.D., University of California, Irvine
Biography: 

May Mei joined the Denison faculty in 2013 after completing her PhD in mathematics at the University of California, Irvine. In addition to teaching a wide variety of courses, Dr. Mei is the faculty advisor for Pi Mu Epsilon, the math honor society. Also, Dr. Mei relishes conversations with aspiring young mathematicians and encourages her students and other math majors to visit her office.

Selected student research projects:

  • Asymptotic Spectral Properties of the Schrodinger Operator with Thue-Morse Potential, William Clark (Ohio University), Rachael Kline (St. John Fisher College), Michaela Stone (Louisiana State University), Summer 2013
  • On the Spectrum of the Penrose Laplacian, Michael Dairyko (Iowa State University), Christine Hoffman (Smith College), Julie Pattyson (University of St Joseph), Hailee Peck (Millikin University), Summer 2013
  • Asymptotic Analysis of the Spectrum of the Discrete Hamiltonian with Period Doubling Potential, Meg Fields (University of North Carolina at Asheville), Tara Hudson (University at Buffalo), Maria Markovich (Shippensburg University), Summer 2013
  • Using the Ammann-Beenker Tiling to Model Quasicrystals, Brittany Livsey (Georgetown College), Jason Mifsud (Binghamton University), Francesca Romano (Siena College), Summer 2013
Research: 

My research interests involve the application of dynamical systems (uniformly hyperbolic, partially hyperbolic, symbolic) to mathematical physics. Specifically, I use dynamical techniques to investigate spectral properties of operators involved in the study of quasicrystals.

I'm also interested in conducting numerical experiments related to mathematical models that describe how an electron passes through quasicrystalline material. This is an area with many possibilities for undergraduate research.

Selected publications:

  • Tridiagonal substitution Hamiltonians, I. Spectral analysis (with W. Yessen), submitted.
  • Spectra of Discrete Schrödinger Operators with Primitive Invertible Substitution Potentials, submitted.
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Alan Miller Miller, Alan Dean Miller

Miller, Alan Dean Miller
Faculty  |  Communication
Visiting Instructor (part-time)
Higley Hall
009
740-587-8520
Service: 
1999-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., M.S., Ohio University
Biography: 

Instructor Alan D. Miller joined the faculty at Denison in 1999. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in journalism at Ohio University and teaches courses in journalism. He also advises the student newspaper, The Denisonian. Outside Denison, Miller is Managing Editor for News for The Columbus Dispatch, president-elect of the Associated Press Society of Ohio and a member of the professional advisory board at the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University.

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Gill Wright Miller ’74 Miller, Gill Wright Wright Miller ’74

Gill Wright Miller '74
Faculty  |  Dance, Environmental Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor & Chair (Dance)
Doane Dance Building
102
740-587-6766
1977
1981
Service: 
1976-1977, 1981-Present
Degree(s): 
B.F.A., Denison University; M.A., Wesleyan University; Ph.D., New York University
Biography: 

Dr. Gill Wright Miller, Associate Professor of Dance and Women's Studies, has been at Denison full-time since 1981. Dr. Miller earned her PhD from New York University in Dance and Women's Studies, her MA from Wesleyan University in Movement Studies, and her BFA in Performance from Denison University.

Dr. Miller's written research concerns public constructions of the pregnant body, healing from a developmental movement base, and body politics in general. She is highly involved in the world of experiential anatomy, most specifically Body-Mind Centering. She has received several grants for her work, including a major grant from the University of Minnesota, in “Embodied Research.” She accepted the coveted Arnold Professorship at Whitman College in Washington for Spring 2009. Her most recent book, Exploring Body-Mind Centering: An Anthology in Experience and Method, was published in 2011, and she is the author of many essays, including the 2011 publications of “Women in Dance” in The Encyclopedia of Women in Today's World and “Creativity and Mothering” in The Encyclopedia of Motherhood.” This past year, Dr. Miller published a chapter called “The Transmission of African-American Concert and American Jazz Dance” in Jazz Dance: Roots and Branches (Oliver and Guarino, 2013.) She is also compiling an anthology on African dance. Dr. Miller is currently working on an essay on research and methodology in dance studies and a second book on Somatics and the Body Movement in the United States, tentatively titled Pedagogies of the Body.

Dr. Miller teaches coursework in somatics, movement analysis, and cultural studies. Besides teaching somatics (including work from Ideokinesis, Bartenieff Fundamentals and Basic Neurocellular Patterns from Body-Mind Centering) and movement analysis (including reconstructing sections of works by Humphrey, Weidman, Limon, Cunningham, and others) every year, her recent courses include topics in dance's cultural studies, such “Modernism ReComposed,” “Postmodernism in Dance,” and “African-American Concert Dance,” and “The Body in Performance.”

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Tim Miller dr. Miller, Timothy I. Miller

Dr.Miller, Timothy I. Miller
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Professor
Higley Hall
205
740-587-6403
Service: 
1978-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts; M.S., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., Southern Illinois University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to Econometrics, Consumer Economies, Mathematical Macroeconomics

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Pete Mills Mills, Peter J. Mills

Pete Mills
Faculty  |  Music  |  Saxophone / Jazz Improvisation
Jazz Ensemble/Studio Instructor/
Burton Hall
106
740-587-6365
Service: 
1999-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A.M., University of Rochester; M.M., University of North Texas
Biography: 

A native of Toronto Canada, saxophonist and composer Pete Mills’ discography includes 4 solo titles, with his most recent, 2014’s Sweet Shadow.  The CD is released on Vancouver based Cellar Live Records and features drummer Matt Wilson (who is also a part of Mills’ disc Art and Architecture), his long time collaborator, guitarist Pete McCann, bassist Martin Wind and pianist Erik Augis.  Mills 2007 release, Fresh Spin on the Summit Records label features B3 organist Tony Monaco and Pete McCann. It received enthusiastic reviews in both DownBeat (3 ½ Stars) and JazzTimes magazines and was on the Jazz Week top 50-radio chart for 8 weeks. His 2004’s release on Summit, Art and Architecture (4 stars All Music Guide), features drummer Matt Wilson, bassist Dennis Irwin and Pete McCann.  A top 50 Jazz Week radio release, it also received airplay on the MTV networks. His first solo release was the critically acclaimed, Momentum (COJAZZ Records). As a sideman he appears on over a dozen CDs including those by The Columbus Jazz Orchestra, saxophonist Chad Eby, the eclectic ensemble Madrugada, guitarist Stan Smith, The Cleveland Jazz Orchestra and The Paul Ferguson Jazz Orchestra. As a soloist Mills works throughout the U.S and Canada. In Columbus Ohio he performs as a featured soloist with the Columbus Jazz Orchestra (Byron Stripling Musical Director). Educated at the Eastman School of Music and the University of North Texas, Mills has received Grants from the Canada Council and was a recipient of the North Carolina Arts Council Jazz Composer’s Fellowship.  In addition to his performing, Mills teaches saxophone, improvisation and directs the jazz ensemble at Denison University in Granville, Ohio.

Critics have called saxophonist Pete Mills' playing “virtuosic” and “gorgeous” and “versatile tenor-kick-butt” (David Franklin, JazzTimes) and the Columbus Dispatch describes Mills' compositions as being “impressive with solos that are ear opening…with a tone that is big and rich”. His discography includes 4 releases as a leader, 2014’s Sweet Shadow featuring Matt Wilson, Pete McCann, Martin Wind and Erik Augis, released on the Vancouver based, Cellar Live Records 2007’s Fresh Spin featuring B3 organist Tony Monaco and Pete McCann (3½ stars Downbeat magazine) and Art and Architecture (4 stars All Music Guide) that also featured Matt Wilson, Pete McCann and the late bassist, Dennis Irwin.  His first solo release was the acclaimed, Momentum (COJAZZ Records).  A native of Toronto Canada, Mills has received grants from The Canada Council and was a recipient of the North Carolina Arts Council Jazz Composer’s Fellowship. As a sideman he appears on over a dozen CDs including those by guitarist Stan Smith, saxophonist Chad Eby, the eclectic ensemble Madrugada, The Cleveland Jazz Orchestra, The Paul Ferguson Jazz Orchestra and The Columbus Jazz Orchestra. Mills performs regularly throughout the U.S and Canada and in Columbus Ohio he is a featured soloist with The Columbus Jazz Orchestra (Byron Stripling, Musical Director). Pete holds degrees from the Eastman School of Music and The University of North Texas and currently teaches saxophone and jazz studies at Denison University.
  

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Rachel Mitton-Fry dr. Mitton-Fry, Rachel Mitton-Fry

Rachel Mitton-Fry
Faculty  |  Chemistry & Biochemistry
Assistant Professor
Ebaugh Laboratories
205
740-587-5691
Service: 
2011-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Carleton College; Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder
Biography: 

Field of interest:

The past decade has seen explosive discovery of non-coding and structural RNAs in biological systems.  Full understanding of these RNA molecules requires detailed characterization of their structures and dynamics. Current efforts in the Mitton-Fry laboratory focus on study of structure-function relationships in a class of RNA elements known as RNA thermosensors. These elements, most commonly found in the 5´-untranslated region (UTR) of bacterial genes, adopt temperature-sensitive structures that affect gene expression levels in response to temperature variation. No protein cofactors have been found to be required for thermosensor function. Most known thermosensors regulate translation of proteins involved in heat or cold shock responses or in pathogenic virulence. My lab seeks to characterize RNA thermosensors using a variety of biochemical and biophysical means, with the goal of greater understanding of the determinants for thermosensor function in biological systems.

I have strong commitment to working with undergraduates on this research, both in the summer and throughout the academic year.

Research: 

Publications:

  • Mitton-Fry, R. M.; DeGregorio, S. J.; Wang, J.; Steitz, T. A.; Steitz, J. A. 2010.  Poly(A) tail recognition by a viral RNA element through assembly of a triple helix. Science, 330, 1244-1247.
  • Steitz, J.; Borah, S.; Cazalla, D.; Fok, V.; Lytle, R.; Mitton-Fry, R.; Riley, K.; Samji, T. 2010. Noncoding RNPs of viral origin. Cold Spring Harb. Perspect. Biol,. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a005165.
  • Fok, V.;‡ Mitton-Fry, R. M.; ‡ Grech, A.; Steitz, J. A. 2006. Multiple domains of EBER 1, an Epstein-Barr virus noncoding RNA, recruit ribosomal protein L22. RNA, 12, 872-882.  ‡Equal authorship.
  • Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Anderson, E. M.; Theobald, D. L.; Glustrom, L. W.; Wuttke, D. S. 2004. Structural basis for telomeric single-stranded DNA recognition by yeast Cdc13. J. Mol. Biol., 338, 241-255. 
  • Theobald, D. L.; Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Wuttke, D. S. 2003. Nucleic acid recognition by OB-fold proteins. Ann. Rev. Biophys. Biomol. Struct., 32, 115-133.
  • Glustrom, L. W.; Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Wuttke, D. S. 2002. Re: 1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene and polychlorinated biphenyls and breast cancer: combined analysis of five U.S. studies. Reviewed letter. J. Natl. Cancer Inst., 94, 1337-1338.
  • Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Anderson, E. M.; Hughes, T. R.; Lundblad, V.; Wuttke, D. S.  2002. Conservation of structure for recognition of single-stranded telomeric DNA. Science, 296, 145-147.
  • Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Wuttke, D. S. 2002. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of the DNA-binding domain of the essential protein Cdc13 complexed with single-stranded telomeric DNA. J. Biomol. NMR, 22, 379-380.
  • Ojennus, D. D.; Mitton-Fry, R. M.; Wuttke, D. S. 1999. Induced alignment and measurement of dipolar couplings of an SH2 domain through direct binding with filamentous phage.  J. Biomol. NMR, 14, 175-179.
  • Norris, J. W.; Fry, R. M.; Tu, A. T. 1997. The nucleotide sequence of the translated and untranslated regions of a cDNA for myotoxin a from the venom of prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis).  Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm., 230, 607-610.

Presentations:

  • Mitton-Fry, R. M., *Cempre, C. B., *Cornell, H. K., *Frandsen, J. K., *Ulanowicz, K. U. 2013. Biochemical characterization of RNA thermosensor structure. Poster presentation at the American Chemical Society 246th National Meeting.  Indianapolis, IN.

Student presentations:

  • *Cempre, C. B., *Ulanowicz, K. A., Mitton-Fry, R. M. 2013. SHAPE analysis of a potential RNA thermosensor in Salmonella enterica.  Poster presentation at the 2013 Rustbelt RNA Meeting. Cleveland, OH.
  • *Frandsen, J. K., *Cornell, J. K., Mitton-Fry, R. M. 2013. Biochemical investigation of a potential RNA thermometer in Enterobacter cloacae.  Poster presentation at the 2013 Rustbelt RNA Meeting. Cleveland, OH.
  • *Ulanowicz, K. A., *Cempre, C. B., Mitton-Fry, R. M. 2013. Characterization of a hypothetical RNA thermometer in Enterobacter cloacae using SHAPE analysis.
  • Poster presentation at the 2013 Rustbelt RNA Meeting. Cleveland, OH.

* denotes Denison undergraduate.

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Gabi Mkhize Mkhize, Gabi Mkhize

Faculty  |  Women’s Studies
Visiting Assistant Professor (part-time)
Blair Knapp Hall
205B
740-587-6297
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Yvonne-Marie Mokam Mokam, Yvonne-Marie Mokam

Faculty  |  French, Modern Languages
Assistant Professor
740-587-6643
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., M.A., University of Yaound Ph.D., University of Arizona, Tucson
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Jenna Monroy Monroy, Jenna Monroy

Jenna Monroy
Faculty  |  Biology, Neuroscience
Assistant Professor, Comparative Physiologist
Samson Talbot Hall of Biological Science
321 / lab 320
740-587-6569
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Jonathan Moore dr. Moore, Jonathan Moore

Dr.Moore, Jonathan Moore
Faculty  |  Religion
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
309A
740-587-8679
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University, M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago
Biography: 
My first book, Suing for America's Soul:  John Whitehead, the Rutherford Institute, and Conservative Christianity in the Courts (Emory Studies in Law and Religion, Eerdmans, 2007), examines the rise of conservative Christian legal advocacy groups in recent decades, and their effects on both evangelical Protestantism and contemporary church-state conflicts.

My book reviews have appeared in Church History, The Journal of Religion, Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, and The Christian Century. I also assisted Martin Marty in writing two books which grew out of our work together at the Public Religion Project: Politics, Religion, and the Common Good: Advancing a Distinctly American Conversation about Religion's Role in Our Shared Life (Jossey-Bass, 2000), and Education, Religion, and the Common Good (Jossey-Bass, 2000).

My current research projects include a book-length examination of what happened when a merry band of Chicago Wiccans decided to move to Hoopeston, Illinois—a downstate town of six thousand dominated by evangelicals—about eight years ago. The story of this community's initial reaction, and the subsequent interaction between pagans and Christians, fascinates on many levels, and provides important lessons regarding the possibilities and limits for religious pluralism in contemporary America. I'm also researching representations of Muslims in American children's literature, which offers another window into the relationship between religion and national identity.

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Hannah Weiss Muller Muller Weiss Muller

Hannah Weiss Muller
Faculty  |  History
Assistant Professor (Britain/British Empire)
Fellows Hall
407
740-587-8676
Biography: 
Dr. Hannah Weiss Muller is a historian of Britain and the British Empire with particular interests in the long eighteenth century and the intersections of law, monarchy, identity, and subjecthood.  She teaches survey courses on early modern and modern Britain, the British Empire, Modern Europe, and Britain and South Asia.  Her upper level seminars focus on global wars and revolutions in the eighteenth century, literature of empire, and colonial and postcolonial studies.
 
Dr. Muller’s current book project, provisionally entitled Subjects and Sovereign: Bonds of Belonging in the British Empire, argues that subject status served as an organizing and contested principle of the eighteenth century and that the bond between monarch and subject was integral to the coherence of the British Empire.  She examines particular debates and struggles that surfaced in Grenada, Quebec, Minorca, Gibraltar, and Calcutta to document the range of peoples who shaped the contours of subjecthood and the array of rights that became associated with British subject status.  Her recent article, “The Garrison Revisited: Gibraltar in the Eighteenth Century,” appeared in The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History (2013) and focuses on the profound interdependencies between the garrison at Gibraltar and its surrounding environment.  It revisits the anxieties said to haunt isolated garrison societies and explores the range of interactions between colonial and local populations.  Dr. Muller regularly presents papers and serves as a commentator at national and international conferences.
 

Dr. Muller received her A.B. from Harvard University (2000) and her Ph.D. from Princeton University (2010).  She was a recipient of the ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship in 2009-2010 and was a Golieb Fellow at the New York University School of Law in 2010-2011.  Prior to coming to Dension in spring 2014, she taught as a Lecturer in the Committee on Degrees in History and Literature at Harvard University. 

 

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Gail Murphy Murphy, Gail E. Murphy

Gail Murphy
Faculty, Staff  |  Athletic Training, Physical Education, Big Red Athletics
Assistant Professor, Head Women's Soccer Coach
Mitchell Recreation and Athletics Center
218
740-587-5728
Service: 
1997-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., University of New Mexico; M.S., Smith College
Biography: 

Since 1997 Gail Murphy has built Denison women's soccer into one of the premier programs in all of NCAA Division III. A two-time NSCAA Regional Coach of the Year honoree, Murphy is one of the winningest active coaches in college soccer. Before Denison, Murphy spent four years at Southwestern University in Texas, where she took a first-year program to a top-10 regional ranking in just two seasons.

While at Southwestern, Murphy was selected as Coach of the Year by the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference. Murphy then made the cross-country switch to Denison, leading the Big Red back to regional and national prominence. The Ohio Collegiate Soccer Association has twice named Murphy its Coach of the Year (1997, 1999).

From 1983 to 1991 she coached Los Alamos (N.M.) High School, where her teams played in the finals of the state tournament five times, winning three championships. She began her college coaching career in 1991 as a graduate assistant in Massachusetts.

Murphy earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Physical Education from the University of New Mexico in 1983 and her Masters of Science in Exercise and Sport Science from Smith College (Mass.) in 1993. Along with her soccer coaching duties, Murphy is an assistant professor on the faculty of Denison's Department of Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation.

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Matthew Neal dr. Neal, Matthew Paul Neal

Matthew Neal
Faculty  |  Computer Science, Mathematics, Computational Science
Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
202
740-587-6288
Service: 
2001-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A. (Mathematics and History), Ph.D., University of Virginia
Biography: 

I grew up in Virginia in a small town and received a Ph.D. in Mathematics at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville.  After completing my Ph. D. work at Oxford and teaching for two years at The University of California at Irvine, I came to Denison where I have spent the last 12 years.  I have a wife, Nancy, and two kids, Joseph (14) and Emily (11).  Mathematically, I am interested in operator theory, probability, and statistics.  Outside of mathematics, I am interested in Jesus Christ first and foremost.  I am also interested in games, history, sports statistics, indie rock, and showing mercy to the poor, lonely, and marginalized.

Selected student research projects:

  • Modeling player value in the NBA, Danny Persia, Summer 2013 (awarded a Pi Mu Epsilon Research Presentation Award, Math Fest 2013)
  • Metric-linear characterizations of operator algebra structures,  Matt Gibson, 2012-2013 (presented at Joint AMS/MAA meetings, 2013)
  • Toward a metric-linear characterizations of operator algebras, Nathan Zakhari, 2010-2011 (awarded a research presentation award, Math Fest 2010)
  • Toward a classification of n-uniform frames in linear coding theory, Glen Sutula, 2011 (presented at Math Fest 2010)
Research: 

Recently, I have done research with students in NBA basketball analytics.  I try to determine what players are worth, which five man-units play well together, and which coaching strategies are most successful.   To do this, I use statistical modeling methods that are commonly used in most real world industries.  Hence, research in NBA analytics is an excellent preparation for any career that involves analyzing data to solve problems.

Much of my research is in Functional Analysis and Algebra.  More specifically, I study the algebra, geometry and topology of spaces of operators.  Operators represent the basic observables of the universe, like energy and momentum.  Although my work is theoretical, the problems I solve are motivated by probabilistic questions in Quantum Mechanics.  I have had success working with students on such problems.  Unlike my basketball analytics projects discussed above, operator theory requires students to be somewhat advanced in their mathematical education.  Students who want to pursue a Ph. D. in Mathematics will benefit most from this kind of work.

Selected publications:

  • A holomorphic characterization of operator algebras (with B. Russo) to appear in Mathematica Scandinavica, 2013
  • Metric characterizations II (with D. Blecher) to appear in the Illinois Journal of Mathematics, 2013
  • Open projections in operator algebras II: compact projections (with D. Blecher), Studia Mathematica 208, pp. 203-224, 2012
  • Open projections in operator algebras I: comparison theory (with D. Blecher). Studia Mathematica 209, pp. 117-150, 2012
  • Metric haracterizations of isometries and of unital operator spaces and systems (with D. Blecher). Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society 139, pp. 985-998, 2011
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Anna E. Nekola Nekola, Anna E. E. Nekola

Anna E. Nekola
Faculty  |  Music, Queer Studies, Communication  |  Music History
Visiting Assistant Professor
Higley Hall
306
740-587-5795
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., St. Olaf College; M.M., Wichita State University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison
Biography: 

Anna joined the Communication Department Fall 2012 to teach a special topics course, Music as a Form of Communication.  Anna earned her B.A. at St. Olaf College, her M.M in oboe performance at Wichita State University where she studied with Emily Pailthorpe, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in musicology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Her ongoing research centers on disputes over the moral and cultural value of popular musics, and she co-authored the article “Cultural Policy in American Music History: Sammy Davis, Jr., vs. Juvenile Delinquency” which appeared in the February 2010 Journal of the Society of American Music.  She also authored a chapter, “U.S. Evangelicals and the Redefinition of Worship Music,” in the anthology Mediating Faiths: Religion, Media and Popular Culture (Ashgate, 2011).

She has contributed several entries to the forthcoming second edition of the Grove Dictionary of American Music and her chapter “Negotiating the Tensions of U.S. Worship Music in the Marketplace” will appear in The Oxford Handbook of Music and World Christianities.

Previous Denison classes taught by Dr. Nekola include: Intro to Queer Studies, Queer Theory, 20th c. Music History, History of Rock, Intro to World Music, FYS 101: “Music and Transcendence”, FYS 101: From Holy Sabbath to Black Sabbath: Religion and Popular Music in 20th-Century America,” FYS 101: “Commemoration and History: Investigating the Politics of Memory,” and FYS 102: 20th-Century Images of Women.”

Anna also maintains an active career as an oboist and reedmaker, and has held positions with professional orchestras in Kansas and Wisconsin.

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Geoffrey Nelson Nelson, Geoffrey Nelson

Faculty  |  Theatre
Visiting Instructor (part-time)
Theatre Arts Building - Ace Morgan Theatre
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Emily Nemeth ’04 Nemeth, Emily Nemeth ’4

Emily Nemeth '04
Faculty  |  Education
Visiting Assistant Professor
740-587-6388
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David Nesmith Nesmith, David K. Nesmith

David Nesmith
Faculty  |  Music  |  Horn / Alexander Technique Instructor
Studio Instructor
Burton Hall
203
740-587-5518
Service: 
2000-Present
Degree(s): 
B.M., Capital University; M.M., Indiana University
Biography: 

David Nesmith had his first Alexander Technique lesson on April Fools’ Day, 1995. He immediately experienced the benefits of practicing The Alexander Technique and decided to immerse himself in what would become a tremendous transformation. “I can change” became the mantra that propelled David from a realm of harmful habit and discomfort to one of discovery and expansiveness.

David’s musical career has developed in leaps and bounds along with his focus on applying The Alexander Technique for performance enhancement and injury prevention. He served for 10 years as Principal horn of the Cleveland Chamber Symphony and has performed with numerous other symphonies. He has been a member of the Cathedral Brass Ensemble (Columbus) since 1990, the West Virginia Symphony since 1985, and has performed with the New Hampshire Music Festival each summer since 1996.

In 2003, after years assimilating wisdom from some of the greatest teachers of The Alexander Technique, David experienced a fundamental shift, feeling free more often than tense. His breath has slowed and deepened and he stands taller. Now a certified Alexander Technique instructor since 2001, he teaches at Denison University and enjoys a private practice in Columbus, Ohio. David continues to explore deeper layers of emotional and intellectual intuition, reassessing the nature and impact of our habitual gestural repertoires.

A licensed member of Andover Educators, he teaches the course What Every Musician Needs to Know about the Body to musicians around the country. He has presented at many conferences and written several articles on The Alexander Technique and Body Mapping. David is also a practitioner member of the All Life Center for Integrative Well Being (Delaware, Ohio).

David is the author of The Breathing Book for Horn and creator of Constructive Rest: The Audio Guide Series, a carefully prepared collection of mp3 downloads, apps, and CD’s incorporating The Eight Primary Intentions of Constructive Rest. These audio guides are available on iTunes®, CDBaby™, the App Store℠, Google Play™, and ConstructiveRest.com.

David considers becoming at ease with himself to be his greatest accomplishment. Whether he is teaching, creating, exploring or at rest, David is engaged in the moment. He is an enthusiastic musician, hiker, and salsa dancer, and truly appreciates getting to know people. His passion for sharing The Alexander Technique takes him all over the world, teaching and participating in workshops.

David’s students thrive in the honest and supportive atmosphere he creates. Being at ease with himself translates as a gentle, confident invitation to rest in authenticity. It becomes clear he trusts that each student, in whatever state they arrive, is capable of achieving great things.

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Isis Nusair Nusair, Isis Nusair

Isis Nusair
Faculty  |  International Studies, Women’s Studies
Associate Professor & Chair (International Studies)
Blair Knapp Hall
210C
740-587-8537
Service: 
2005-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Tel-Aviv University; M.A., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Clark University
Biography: 

Isis Nusair, Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and International Studies at Denison University. She has earned a Bachelor’s degree in Social Work from Tel-Aviv University, a Master’s degree in International Peace Studies from the University of Notre Dame, and a doctorate in Women’s and Gender Studies from Clark University. She teaches courses on transnational feminism; gendered migration, feminism in the Middle East and North Africa; and gender, war and conflict.

Isis previously served as a researcher on women’s human rights in the Middle East and North Africa at Human Rights Watch and at the Euro-Mediterranean Human Rights Network. She is currently working on two book projects. The first focuses on the impact of war and displacement on Iraqi women refugees in Jordan and the USA, and the other on gendering the narratives of four generations of Palestinian women in Israel from 1948 until the present. She is the co-editor with Rhoda Kanaaneh of Displaced at Home: Ethnicity and Gender among Palestinians in Israel. She is a contributor to the Encyclopedia of Women and Islamic Cultures and the Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa. She serves on the editorial committee of the Middle East Report and is a member of Jadaliyya’s DARS team.

Research: 

Publications:

  • “Negotiating Identity, Space and Place among Iraqi Women Refugees in Jordan.” Doing Research in Conflict Zones: Experiences from the Field. Eds. Dyan Mazurana, Karen Jacobsen, and Lacey A. Gale.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013: 56-77.
  • The Cultural Costs of the 2003 US-led Invasion of Iraq: A Conversation with Art Historian Nada Shabout.” Feminist Studies, 39 (1), 2013: 119-148. full text
  • Permanent Transients: Iraqi Women Refugees in Jordan.” Middle East Report 266, 2013: 20-25. full text
  • “Gendering the Narratives of Three Generations of Palestinian Women in Israel.”  Displaced at Home: Ethnicity and Gender among Palestinians in Israel. Eds. Rhoda Kanaaneh and Isis Nusair. New York: SUNY Press, 2010. 75-92. full text [pdf]
  • “Introduction” (with Rhoda Kanaaneh)  Displaced at Home: Ethnicity and Gender among Palestinians in Israel. Eds. Rhoda Kanaaneh and Isis Nusair. New York: SUNY Press, 2010. 1-18. full text [pdf]
  • Gender Mainstreaming and Feminist Organizing in the Middle East and North Africa.” Women and war in the Middle East. Eds. Nadje Al-Ali and Nicola Pratt. London: Zed Books, 2009. 131-157. full text [pdf]
  • Gendered, Racialized and Sexualized Torture at Abu-Ghraib.” Feminism and War: Confronting U.S. Imperialism. Eds. Robin Riley, Chandra Mohanty, Minnie Bruce Pratt. London: Zed Books, 2008.  179-193. full text [pdf]
  • “The Integration of the Human Rights of Women from the Middle East and North Africa in the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership” (with Rabea Naciri). Denmark: Euro-Mediterranean Human Rights Network, 2003.
  • Gendered Politics of Location: Generational Intersections.” Women and the Politics of Military Confrontation: Palestinian and Israeli Gendered Narratives of Dislocation. Eds. Nahla Abdo and Ronit Lentin. London: Berghahn Books, 2002. 89-99. full text [pdf]
  • Women and Militarization in Israel: Forgotten Letters in the Midst of Conflict.” Frontline Feminisms: Women, War, and Resistance. Eds. Marguerite Waller and Jennifer Rycenga. London: Routledge, 2001. 113-128. full text [pdf]

Commentary: 

Talking to the Media about Veiling in the Middle East


By: Isis Nusair, Associate Professor of International Studies &  Women’s Studies, Denison University



At a time when Arabs and Muslims are becoming the ultimate “enemy others,” how are we to talk about Islam and particularly Muslim women to the media? What happens if our quotes are misrepresented or taken out of context, and what if they are used to reinforce the same biases we aim to counter? How are we to deal with online media when racist websites can, with a click of a mouse, draw on our “quotes” to reinforce their own hateful agendas? It is part of our role as academics and educators to engage in public discourse. Yet, is talking to the media becoming too risky? 



I have had unfortunate reason to consider these questions. I was contacted early in the fall semester of 2009 by Theodore May, an American journalist who writes for the Global Post, about veiling in Egypt. In the past, I have usually avoided talking about these issues to the media because of its historic sensationalist representations of Arab and Muslim women. However, May asked intelligent questions and seemed serious about studying 
the subject from all its angles. I suggested the names of people he could contact and naively expected him to share the final draft of his article with me. I emphasized during our phone conversation that writing about the veil is very complex and laden with colonial, Orientalist, and stereotypical representations of both Islam and Arabs. I also said that Muslim women veil for a variety of reasons. These could be religious as well as economic or to protect themselves from sexual harassment in the public sphere. When talking about economic reasons, I emphasized the issue of class and how some young women cannot afford designer clothes when attending college. Therefore, wearing the veil could also be about income levels in addition to a variety of other factors.



The resultant story had little to do with the words I provided to the writer. The only quote attributed to me in May's article, published online in the Global Post on September 14, 2009, (“Some Women Find  Egypt a Colder Place”) was: ” 'Some women can’t afford 2 million dresses,' said Isis Nusair, a professor of women’s studies at Denison University in Ohio, 'and wearing the hijab is cheap.'

“

Not only is May’s quote sensationalist, selective, and misrepresentative of what I said and the nuances in which I presented my argument, it also is now featured on the Islamophobic website “Bare Naked Islam - It isn’t Islamophobia when they really are trying to kill you.

“

In my attempt to contact the Post and complain about the quote attributed to me, I received the following response from the editor, Barbara Martinez: “What Theo did was not cherry-picking, but choosing the most interesting and lively quote for an 800-word overview of the topic, the only thing Dr. Nusair said that he hadn't heard from other sources. Had she not said anything original, he would not have quoted her at all. The story itself puts the quote into context and presents the veil issue as complex.” The editor's implication was that I should feel grateful to have been quoted. “Grateful” hardly describes my reaction.



I am hesitant to conclude that the right solution is to avoid talking to the media. There is abundant misinformation in my field of study, concerning women in the Middle East and North Africa, and I'm sure the same is true for those who concentrate on areas all across the academic curriculum. I'd like to think that if we, as academics, spoke out more frequently in public arenas on issues of importance, then perhaps the charade of misinformation could be lifted. But how are we to feel comfortable speaking out when digital proliferation practically guarantees that an irresponsible use of our words will live forever online and might even be used to bolster ignorance? Is there a tyranny of silence brought about by the threat of misrepresented ideas? How many dedicated scholars refuse to share their expertise in the public media because it's just not worth it? These are the questions that I’ll be thinking about next time the phone rings and it's a reporter calling.

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Steven Olmschenk dr. Olmschenk, Steven M. Olmschenk

Steven Olmschenk
Faculty  |  Astronomy, Physics
Assistant Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
104
740-587-8661
Service: 
2012-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., B.A., University of Chicago; M.Sc., M.S.E., Ph.D. University of Michigan
Biography: 

I arrived at Denison University in 2012, following postdoctoral research in the Laser Cooling group at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland.  Currently, I am doing experimental research in atomic physics and quantum information.  Over the last several years, advances in laser cooling, trapping, and optical/rf manipulation of atoms has given us unprecedented control over the quantum states of these systems.  One of the most intriguing applications of this work is in quantum information, where we want to utilize quantum physics to tackle otherwise intractable computational problems.  This is being pursued at Denison using cold, trapped atomic ions, which have been recognized as a promising candidate for quantum bit (qubit) implementation due to their long trapping times, excellent coherence properties, and the exquisite control that can be achieved over both internal and external degrees of freedom.

Here at Denison I am teaching a variety of courses on all aspects of physics.  Some of the things I am particularly excited about is adding versatile microcontrollers and FPGAs to the curriculum of the electronics course, and having the opportunity to introduce additional contemporary topics in physics to the classroom.

Research: 

Selected publications:

  • S. Olmschenk, R. Chicireanu, K. D. Nelson, and J. V. Porto, “Randomized benchmarking of atomic qubits in an optical lattice,” New J. Phys. 12, 113007 (2010)
  • S. Olmschenk, D. N. Matsukevich, P. Maunz, D. Hayes, L.-M. Duan, and C. Monroe, "Quantum Teleportation Between Distant Matter Qubits," Science 323, 486 (2009)
  • S. Olmschenk, K. C. Younge, D. L. Moehring, D. Matsukevich, P. Maunz, and C. Monroe, "Manipulation and Detection of a Trapped Yb+ Hyperfine Qubit," Phys. Rev. A 76, 052314 (2007)
Curriculum Vitae: 
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Carrie Olson Olson, Carrie Edith Olson

Faculty  |  Studio Art
Associate Professor
Bryant Arts Center
210
740-587-6466
Service: 
2004-Present
Degree(s): 
B.F.A., Massachusetts College of Art; M.F.A., University of Colorado, Boulder
Biography: 

Professor Olson arrived at Denison in the Fall of 2004. She has shown her work in numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout the US and internationally. Her research and teaching interests include ceramic history, ornament, installation and particularly, material culture and its role in the construction of collective identity and individual persona.

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Tiffany Ozbun Ozbun, Tiffany Ozbun

Tiffany Ozbun
Faculty, Staff  |  Athletic Training, Physical Education, Big Red Athletics
Assistant Professor, Head Softball Coach
Mitchell Recreation and Athletics Center
214
740-587-6784
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Manchester College; M.S., University of Louisville
Biography: 

Tiffany Ozbun has served as the head softball coach at Denison since the fall of 2007. Already a multi-time North Coast Athletic Conference Coach of the Year, Ozbun has made quite a splash in her first six seasons at the helm of the Big Red softball program. 

Prior to her arrival at Denison, Ozbun spent three seasons as an assistant coach at Manchester University where she was responsible for pitcher/catcher development and the team's strength and conditioning program. She aided in the development of numerous all-conference and all-region athletes and in the fall of 2005 stepped in as the interim head coach/senior women's administrator at Manchester. Ozbun also served as an instructor in the Exercise and Sport Science department.

Prior to returning to Manchester, Ozbun spend three seasons at the University of Louisville where she earned a master of science in sport administration. While at Louisville, Ozbun worked primarily with catchers and defense while assisting in the development of numerous all-region and all-conference players, including the Cardinals' first All-American. In 2004, Louisville earned the program's first NCAA Tournament bid. That year, the Cardinals also set a Conference USA record for wins in a season (41).

As a player, Ozbun was a four-year letter winner and three-year co-captain for the Spartans. She led Manchester to the 2001 Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference championship and was named the team's most valuable player. She was the recipient of Manchester's Betty Clark Memorial award for her outstanding scholarship, athletic achievement, leadership and service and was a member of the Manchester Directors Council and the Manchester Faculty Athletic Committee.

Since 2002 Ozbun has served as the director of the University of Louisville Softball Camps and has spent her summers working various national camps and clinics. A member of the National Fastpitch Coaches Association (NFCA) since 2003, Ozbun is also active in the Ohio High School Fastpitch Softball Coaches Association (OHSFSCA).

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Nilay Özok-Gündoğan Özok-Gündoğan, Nilay Özok-Gündoğan

Nilay Özok-Gündoğan
Faculty  |  History, International Studies
Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
425
740-587-6258
Biography: 

Nilay Ozok-Gundogan is a historian of the Modern Middle East with a focus on the late Ottoman Empire. Her research interests include state-making, changing property regimes, and inter-ethnic relations in imperial peripheries. She teaches survey courses on the history of Islamic societies, the Modern Middle East, and the US-Middle East relations as well as upper-level seminars on social movements, ethno-religious conflicts, and cities in modern Middle East.

Dr. Ozok-Gundogan’s current research examines the transformation of the Ottoman state’s frontier administration in Kurdistan province during the Tanzimat (Reorganization) period.

She received her BA and MA from Bosphorus University, Istanbul and her Ph.D. from SUNY Binghamton. In 2011-2012, she was an ACM-Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Cornell College.

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Keun-Joo Christine Pae dr. Pae, Christine K. Pae

Keun-Joo Christine Pae
Faculty  |  Religion, Queer Studies, Women’s Studies
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
310D
740-587-5619
Service: 
2008-Present
Degree(s): 
B.Ed., Seoul National University of Education, Seoul; M.Th., Yonsei University, Seoul; M.Div., Yale University, M.Phil, Ph.D., Union Theological Seminary in NYC
Biography: 

Dr. K. Christine Pae joined the faculty at the Department of Religion in Fall 2008. Since then, she has taught religious ethics, Christian social ethics, and transnational feminist ethics for both the Department of Religion and the Women’s Studies Program. As a Christian feminist ethicist, Christine’s academic interests include feminist peacemaking and interfaith spiritual activism, transnationalized militarism with focus on intersection between gender and race, transnational feminist ethics, and Asian/Asian-American perspectives on post-colonial racial relations. Currently Christine is working on her manuscript, Sex and War: A Christian Feminist Ethic of War and Peace. She has published and presented several essays concerning war, women, Asian American Christianity, and religious ethics. As a co-convener, she serves the Asian American Ethics Working Group at the Society of Christian Ethics (2011-2013).

Research: 

Publications

  • Minjung Theology and Transnational Militarism.”  Ahn Byung-Mu and Minjung (eds.), Theology in the 21st Century.  Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers, 2012. (Forthcoming)
  • “Asian Ethics.”  Edited by Miguel De La Torre (ed.), Ethics: A Liberative Approach.  Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Fortress, 2012 (Forthcoming).
  • “Will to Power, Divided Self: Valerie Saiving and Reinhold Niebuhr on Sin.” Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, 2012 (Forthcoming).
  • “Making an Asian American Christian Public Ethic: Unavoidable Burden of Race.” Journal of Society of Christian Ethics, Spring 2012 (Forthcoming).
  • “Korean American Churches’ Negotiating Spaces in Flushing, the Queens of New York City.”  Nadia Mian, Richard Cimino, and Wei-Shan Huang (eds.),  Religions and New York City: An Ecological Frame.  Bloomington:  Indiana University Press, 2011 (Forthcoming).
  • “A Solidary-Talk among Women of Color: Creating the “We” Category.” Keeping the Light: Faith, Feminism, and Scholarship.  Kate Ott and Melanie Harris (eds.). New York: Palgrave McMillan, 2011.
  • “Feminist Theo-Ethical Reflection on War: In Remembrance of ‘Comfort Women.’”  Yale University Divinity School. Reflections.
  • “Western Princesses—a Missing Story:   in the Borderlands: A Christian Feminist Ethical Analysis of U.S. Military Prostitution in South Korea.”  Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 29, no.2 (2009), 121-39.
  • “Negotiated or Negotiating Spaces: Korean Churches in Flushing, Queens of New York City.” Cross Currents: Religious Communities and Global Cities 58, no. 4 (2008), 456-74.
  • “We Are Asian and Asian-American Women—Generation X: A Post- Colonial Feminist Liturgy in North America.” New and Borrowed Rites: Liturgy 23,no. 1(2007).
  • “Allergy: Killing the Other vs. God: Liberating the Other—A Theological Reflection toward Liberation of the Korean Military Wives” Doing Theology from Korean Women’s Perspectives: Ewha Journal of Feminist Theology 4 (2006).

Community Service

  • 2011-Present: Convener, Asian and Asian American Working Group, Society of Christian Ethics
  • 2009-Present: Denison University Diversity Advisory Committee
  • Hosted a teaching workshop for the junior faculty of color.  
  • 2009-Present: Denison Museum Board
  • 2008-Present: Women’s Studies Committee, and Queer Studies Committee, Denison University
  • Hosted two campus-wide public events on religion and sexuality.
  • 2009: Women of Color Leadership Project National Women’s Studies Association
  • 2009-2010: Program Committee, Peace for Life: World without Empire International Conference in New York City 
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Caryl Palmer Palmer, Caryl Anne Palmer

Faculty  |  Music
Suzuki Instructor
Burton Hall
308
740-587-6591
Service: 
1985-Present
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Gregg Parini Parini, Gregg Parini

Gregg Parini
Faculty, Staff  |  Athletic Training, Physical Education, Big Red Athletics
Associate Professor, Head Swimming Coach
Mitchell Recreation and Athletics Center
007
740-587-6678
Service: 
1987-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Kenyon College; M.A., Michigan State University
Biography: 

Gregg Parini has been the head men’s and women’s swimming coach at Denison since the fall of 1987. Since taking over both Denison programs, Parini has gone on to build one of the most consistently successful programs in the history of Division III athletics.  Under Parini’s watch his teams have captured three national championships, 13 national runner-up finishes in addition to Denison’s current streak of 52 consecutive top-10 national finishes.

A nine-time NCAA National Coach of the Year, Parini's men's swimming & diving team won its second-consecutive Division III national championship in 2012, outdistancing second-place Kenyon by 81 points.  Over the course of the four-day meet, Denison's men set six NCAA Division III records.

In 2011 the men's team shocked the swimming & diving world when they snapped Kenyon College’s 31-year streak of national championships.  The Big Red ended the streak by rallying from 36 points down on the final day only to win by one point, which was the closest finish in the history of the NCAA swimming & diving championship.

The national championship was the second of Parini’s career.  The first came in 2001 when his women’s squad snapped Kenyon’s streak of 17-consecutive national titles in Buffalo, N.Y. In addition to his success in the coaching ranks, Parini’s career as an educator and Associate Professor at Denison has been equally impressive.  In May of 2011 he was honored by the Collegiate Swimming Coaches Association of America as the recipient of the National Collegiate and Scholastic Trophy which is the highest award bestowed by the CSCAA.  In 2007 he was awarded the Charles A. Brickman Teaching Excellence Award which is given annually to one faculty member who has demonstrated a vibrant interest in the learning process, as well as an understanding of teaching as a continuously evolving art form: someone who embraces the teaching and mentoring of students, not just as a profession, but as a calling.

Parini began his coaching career in 1984 as a volunteer assistant women's coach at Michigan State University where he earned his master’s in counseling psychology. Since then he has held coaching positions for the Upper Arlington Swim Club, Mount Union College and East Lansing High School.

He is a 1982 graduate of Kenyon College where he was a member of Jim Steen’s first national championship team in 1979. A tri-captain for the 1981-82 season, he led the team to its third NCAA crown in as many years. Parini was an 18-time All-American, a seven-time Division III National Champion, and left Kenyon with five national records. He was voted the team’s most valuable swimmer in 1981 and Senior Athlete of the Year in 1982 by the Lords athletic department.  In 2002 he was inducted into Kenyon College’s Athletic Hall of Fame.

In addition to his coaching efforts, Parini has also made an impact in the community of Granville. He is the founder, owner and director of The Swimming Clinic, a clinic for age-group swimmers. He is a volunteer Youth Baseball and Hockey coach for both the Granville Recreation Commission and the Newark Ice Hockey Association. He has served as a Youth Group Leader for the Trinity Episcopal Church. Also in Granville, he is the co-founder and co-director of the Red, White and Hoops Basketball Tournament for the Granville Recreation Commission.

Parini is currently a member of the College Swimming Coaches Association of America, the American Swimming Coaches Association, United States Swimming and the National Interscholastic Swimming Coaches Association.

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Emily Patronik Patronik, Emily Patronik

Emily Patronik
Faculty  |  Music  |  Bassoon
Affiliated Studio Instructor
Burke Hall of Music & Art
740-587-6220
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Peter Pauze Pauze, Peter E. Pauze

Peter Pauze
Faculty  |  Theatre
Associate Professor
Theatre Arts Building - Ace Morgan Theatre
7
740-587-6529
Service: 
1994-Present
Degree(s): 
M.F.A, University of Georgia B.A., Gordon College
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Jim Pletcher dr. Pletcher, James R. Pletcher

Jim Pletcher
Faculty  |  Provost's Office, Political Science, International Studies, Lugar Program in Politics and Public Service
Associate Provost and Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
305-C
740-587-6469
Service: 
1983-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of Michigan; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
Biography: 

Dr Jim Pletcher joined the faculty 1983 after earning his doctorate from the  University of Wisconsin-Madison. At Denison he has served in a variety of faculty governance rules including coordinating the Early Career mentoring Program and the Preparing Future Faculty Program. He currently serves as the University's Director of Fellowships. He is also the Executive director of the Africa Network, a consortium of liberal arts colleges and professors teaching about Africa at the undergraduate level. Jim also currently holds the Charles and Nancy Brickman distinguished Service chair.

Dr Pletcher's research focuses on the politics and institutions of agricultural production and marketing in the developing world. Most of his research has been done in Africa, though he has worked in Malaysia as well. Jim's current project explores the dynamics of small holder production and marketing of agricultural exports in Uganda. I am also looking at the effect of import standards and global trade negotiations on Ugandan exports.

Research: 

Publications

  • James R. Pletcher. "The Politics of Liberalizing Zambia's Maize Markets." World Development. January 2000. v. 28 no. 1 p. 129-42
  • James R. Pletcher. "Agriculture and the Dual Transition in Zambia." Journal of Developing Areas. Winter 1999. v. 33 no. 2 p. 199-222
  • James R. Pletcher with Brian Siegel and John Grotpeter. The Historical Dictionary of Zambia, 2nd Edition. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press. 1998.
  • James R. Pletcher. "Ecological Deterioration and Agricultural Stagnation in Eastern Province, Zambia," Centennial Review. Spring 1991. v. 35 no. 2 p. 369-88
  • James R. Pletcher. "Regulation With Growth: The Political Economy of Palm Oil in Malaysia," World Development. June 1991. v. 19 no. 6 p. 623-36
  • James R. Pletcher. "Public Interventions in Agricultural Markets in Malaysia: Rice and Palm Oil," Modern Asian Studies. May 1990. v. 24 no. 2 p. 323-40
  • James R. Pletcher. "Rice and Padi Market Management in West Malaysia, 1957-86," The Journal of Developing Areas. April 1989. v. 23 p. 363-84
  • James R. Pletcher. "The Political Uses of Agricultural Markets in Zambia," Journal of Modern African Studies. December 1986. v. 24 no. 4 p. 603-17
  • James R. Pletcher. "The National, Regional and Household Contexts of Agricultural Production in Eastern Province, Zambia," Proceedings of the African Agricultural Development Conference. Pomona: California State Polytechnic University, 1985.

Book Reviews

  • Review of African Economies and the Politics of Permanent Crisis, 1979-1999 by Nicolas van de Walle in The Journal of Modern African Studies 41,3 (2003): 502-03.
  • Review of Africa's Quest for Economic Development: Uganda's Experience by Jossy R. Bibangambah in The Journal of Modern African Studies 41,2 (2003): 323-24.
  • Review of Structural Adjustment: Theory, Practice and Impacts by Giles Mohan, Ed Brown, Bob Milward, and Alfred B. Zack-Williams in The Journal of Modern African Studies 39,2 (2001): 373-74.
  • Review of Government and Society in Malaysia by Harold Crouch in Crossroads: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 12,1 (1998): 213 -15.
  • Review of Cutting Down Trees by Henrietta Moore and Megan Vaugh in The Journal of Modern African Studies 34,4 (1996): 728-30.
  • Review of No Shortcuts to Progress: African Development Management in Perspective by Goran Hyden in The Political Science Quarterly, 99 (Fall, 1984): 578-79.
  • Review of Underdevelopment and the Transition to Socialism: Mozambique and Tanzania by James Mittelman in The Political Science Quarterly, 98 (Spring, 1982): 171- 72.

Conference Papers and Lectures 

  • "Export Standards and Development in Uganda," International Studies Association conference, Honolulu, Hawaii, 4 March 2005.
  • "Organizing Coffee Farmers and Markets in Uganda," International Studies Association-Midwest, St. Louis, 7 November 2003.
  • "Agricultural Markets and Liberalization in Zambia," Invited lecture, Center for African Studies, University of Copenhagen, 22 April 2002.
  • "Rent-Seeking, Redistribution, and Repression: The Politics of Liberalizing Agricultural Markets in Zambia," International Studies Association conference, Washington, D.C., 17 February 1999.
  • "Zambia's Agricultural Liberalization in Comparative Perspective," African Studies Association conference, Chicago, IL, 29 October - 1 November 1998.
  • "Succession and Political Institutionalization," African Studies Association conference, San Francisco, CA, 23-26 November 1996.
  • "Political Institutionalization and Succession," African Studies Association conference, Seattle, WA, 20-23 November 1992.
  • "The State and Class Formation in the West Malaysian Palm Oil Industry, 1960-1985," Asian Studies Association conference, Washington, D.C., 2-5 April 1992.
  • "Political Succession in Africa, 1960-1990: Zambia," African Studies Association conference, St. Louis, MO, 23-26 November 1991.
  • "Ecological Deterioration and Agricultural Stagnation in Eastern Province, Zambia," Conference on Environment and Development in Africa and Latin America, East Lansing, MI, September 28-30,1990.
  • "Public Interventions in Agricultural Markets in Malaysia: Rice and Palm Oil," International Seminar on Malaysian Agricultural Policy: Issues and Directions, June, 1988, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.
  • "The Agricultural Crisis and Politics in Zambia," African Studies Association, annual conference, New Orleans, 1985.
  • "The National, Regional and Household Contexts of Agricultural Production in Eastern Province, Zambia," Conference on African Agricultural Development: Technology, Ecology and Society, Pomona, CA, May 28 - June 1, 1985.
  • "Agricultural Change in Eastern Province, Zambia," African Studies Association, annual conference, Los Angeles, 1979.

Academic Grants

  • Denison University Research Foundation Grant and a Global Partners East Africa Gravel Grant, 2004 for research to study agricultural export standards in Uganda.
  • Mellon Faculty Career Enhancement Program Grant and a Robert C. Good Fellowship, Denison University, for Spring 2005 for research on agricultural export standards in Uganda.
  • Global Partners East Africa Travel Grant, 2003 for research to study farmers' organizations in Eastern Uganda.
  • Robert C. Good Fellowship, Denison University, for Spring 1998 for research on "Farmers' Associations, Civil Society, and Reform in Zambia."
  • Denison University Research Foundation Grant, 1997, for research on farmers' groups in the process of political and economic liberalization in Zambia, in Lusaka, Zambia.
  • Denison University Research Foundation Grant, 1995, for research on agricultural market liberalization, and The Historical Dictionary of Zambia in Lusaka, Zambia.
  • Program for the Institutional Collaboration in Area Studies (PICAS), University of Michigan, Fall 1992 for research on the state and agricultural development in Indonesia, Thailand and Indonesia.
  • Robert C. Good Fellowship, Denison University, Spring 1992 for research on "The Politics of Agricultural Reform in Africa."
  • American Political Science Association Research Grant, 1987 for research on "Public Interventions in Agricultural Markets in Malaysia."
  • Denison University Research Foundation Grant, 1987, for research on "Public Interventions in Agricultural Markets in Malaysia."
  • National Science Foundation graduate fellow, 1976-1979.
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Heather N. Pool Pool, Heather N. N. Pool

Heather N. Pool
Faculty  |  Political Science, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
740-587-6503
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., St. John's College (Santa Fe) M.A., University of Washington Ph.D., University of Washington
Biography: 

I have led a peripatetic life. I grew up in Oklahoma, went to school in New Mexico and Maryland, then moved to New Jersey and New York, then moved to Seattle, Washington, to attend graduate school at the University of Washington.  The Midwest is one of the few locales I have had little experience with, so I’m looking forward to exploring this corner of the world. 

In addition to spending lots of time in different places, I have also held a variety of jobs.  From joining the Oklahoma Air National Guard as a senior in high school to spending a summer as a packer for a moving company to deciding it would be great fun to be a over-the-road truck driver (it wasn’t fun for very long) to working briefly for Martha Stewart’s media corporation, I’ve had enough jobs to know that being a professor is just about the best job there is.  In addition to reading foundational works of historic significance as a political theorist, I have the opportunity to interact with students whose creativity, character, and persistence inspire me to work ever harder to be a better teacher.  A job at a school like Denison – where pedagogy is a common point of conversation among the faculty, but where research is given space and support – is exactly what I hoped for when I started graduate school.

In addition to summer research and teaching during the school year, I enjoy a range of outdoor activities, particularly hiking and camping.  My goal is always to find a way to spend a week each year in Washington and a week in New Mexico; sadly, I fail at this regularly. My partner of 14 years, Lisa Clarke, is currently in Washington, DC, where she serves as a Teacher Ambassador Fellow at the US Department of Education.

Research: 

Using the resources of critical and normative political theory, sociolegal scholarship, race and gender scholarship, and American political development, my research focuses on how ideas, events, and institutions shape political identities.

My dissertation, completed in 2011, focused on moments when the deaths of everyday citizens led to some kind of political change.  An article taken from my dissertation appeared in Polity in 2012 as “The Politics of Mourning: The Triangle Fire and the Consolidation of Political Identity.” In that article, I examine the Triangle Fire of 1911 as an example of how mourning the loss of everyday citizens can become an effective means of calling for political change, with a particular focus on how the racial identities of the victims shaped the conversation. Another article, drawn from my dissertation, is forthcoming in 2014 in Law, Culture and the Humanities; “Mourning Emmett Till” considers the role of Emmett Till’s 1955 murder in the new interest of Northern whites in civil rights struggles in the South. I am in the process of revising my dissertation into a monograph, which I intend to get under contract by the end of the summer 2014.

Additionally, a forthcoming article on pedagogy, co-authored with Allison Rank, is forthcoming in 2014 in PS: Political Science & Politics and it titled “Writing Better Writing Assignments.” Both Allison and I were directors of a social science Writing Center at a major R1 university, and found that a considerable challenge faced by student writers was confusingly written paper assignments. So we joined forces to think about how to write clear prompts that accomplish specific tasks.

Curriculum Vitae: 
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Fred Porcheddu ’87 dr. Porcheddu, Frederick Christopher Porcheddu ’87

Fred Porcheddu '87
Faculty  |  English
Associate Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
309
740-587-6246
Service: 
1992-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Denison University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Fred Porcheddu-Engel teaches courses on medieval and Early Modern British and European literature, including the Arthurian and Charlemagne legends, Chaucer, and pastoral poetry, as well as on fantasy and children’s literature and the history of the English Language. His essays on editorial practice, medieval manuscript collecting, and literary history have appeared in or are forthcoming in arts, humanities, and library journals including Art Documentation, The Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts, Manuscripta, Medium Aevum, and Philological Quarterly. He is currently collaborating with Dr. Patrick J. Murphy of Miami University on a book-length study of Cambridge medievalist and ghost story writer M.R. James; the first of their series of essays on James have appeared in Studies in Medievalism and English Literature in Transition. In 2012 he was named the inaugural holder of Denison’s Viola Kleindienst Professorship.

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Karen Powell Sears Powell Sears, Karen Powell Sears

Faculty  |  Sociology / Anthropology
Visiting Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
101 B
740-587-6309
Biography: 

I am a quantitative sociologist with research concentrations in social psychology, educational achievement and health disparities.  I value a mixed methods approach, as ethnographies uniquely reveal the nuanced experiences within a population. My work stems from the desire to understand the processes through which social constructs such as race, ethnicity, social class, gender, and sexuality help to shape human experiences.  My teaching professional and personal background experience in Jamaica, West Indies allows me to investigate these issues within a United States and Caribbean context.

Research: 

My dissertation research explores several contextual and social psychological factors related to achievement among middle class high school students. I examine student perceptions of active academic stereotypes and their impact on self concept, attitudes and behavior.  The research provides a unique insight into psychological and educational consequences of school based inequality.  It also reveals interesting relationships between student motivation, coping mechanisms, and other factors which promote academic and personal resilience.

I have also done research to understand the ways that social background factors can shape health service experiences and contribute to health disparities.  Much of this work involves examining the dynamics of communication between patients and health providers.  In a recent study I investigated the relationship between patient assessments of physician trustworthiness, and patterns of follow up care after a health service visit. Based upon my research and experience as a health equity consultant I have published recommendations aimed at improving physician cultural competency through education.

Currently, I am involved in two research projects.  The first is a quantitative analysis of the role that trusting the physician plays in promoting patient adherence and positive health behaviors.  The second is a mixed methods study investigating diverse LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) individuals’ health related attitudes, behaviors and experiences with providers. This work will be useful for improving education and training for health providers, and enable more effective advocacy for traditionally under-served populations. 

Recent publications

  • Improving cultural competence education: the utility of an intersectional framework. Powell Sears, Karen. Medical Education vol. 46 issue 6 June 2012. p. 545-551
  • The Impact of Different Types of Intimate Partner Violence on the Mental and Physical Health of Women in Different Ethnic Groups. Lacey, Krim K.; McPherson, Melnee Dilworth; Samuel, Preethy S.; Powell Sears, Karen; Head, Doreen. Journal of Interpersonal Violence vol. 28 issue 2 January 2013. p. 359-385
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