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David Baker dr. Baker, David A. Baker

David Baker
Faculty  |  English
Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
209
740-587-6419
Service: 
1984-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S.E., M.A., Central Missouri State University; Ph.D., University of Utah
Biography: 

David Baker is Professor of English and holds the Thomas B. Fordham Chair of Creative Writing. He is the author of ten books of poetry, most recently Never-Ending Birds (2009, W. W. Norton), which won the Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Prize. His five prose books are Show Me Your Environment: Essays on Poetry, Poets, and Poems (forthcoming 2014), Talk Poetry: Poems and Interviews with Nine American Poets (2012), Radiant Lyre: Essays on Lyric Poetry (2007, with Ann Townsend), Heresy and the Ideal: On Contemporary Poetry (2000) and Meter in English: A Critical Engagement (1996). Dr. Baker's poems and essays have appeared widely in such magazines as American Poetry Review, The Atlantic Monthly, The Nation, The New Republic, The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Poetry, Slate, The Yale Review, and more than a hundred others. For his work he has received fellowships and awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Poetry Society of America, the Ohio Arts Council, and the Society of Midland Authors.

At Denison Dr. Baker teaches classes in creative writing, poetry writing, American and modern literature, poetic theory, and others. He has taught previously at Kenyon College, the University of Michigan, and The Ohio State University, and occasionally serves on the faculty of the MFA program for writers at Warren Wilson College. Dr. Baker also is Poetry Editor of The Kenyon Review. In 2012, 2006 and 2001 he served on the faculty of the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference.

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Gary Baker dr. Baker, Gary Lee Baker

Gary Baker
Faculty  |  German, Modern Languages, International Studies
Professor
Fellows Hall
419
740-587-6213
Service: 
1989-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Juniata College; M.A., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota
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Suzanne Baker Baker, Suzanne Simons Baker

Suzanne Baker
Faculty  |  Education
Instructor/Teacher Education Program Associate
740-587-5768
Service: 
1998-Present
Degree(s): 
B.Mu.Ed., St. Norbert College; M.M., University of Minnesota; M.Ed, Ohio State University
Biography: 

Suzanne Baker, Adjunct Instructor and Field Experience Coordinator, has been at Denison since 1998. She holds a B. Mu.Ed. from St. Norbert College in DePere, WI, an MM in Vocal Performance from the University of Minnesota, and an M.Ed in Elementary Education from The Ohio State University. Before working at Denison in the Department of Education she taught music K-8. She has taught all ages, preschool through adulthood, through teaching in the classroom, private music lessons, directing children's choirs, and tutoring.

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Paul Barickman dr. Barickman, Paul H. Barickman

Paul Barickman
Faculty  |  English, First-Year Program
Visiting Assistant Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
210
740-587-6460
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University
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Wendy Barrie-Wilson Wilson, Wendy Barrie-Wilson

Wendy Barrie-Wilson
Faculty  |  Theatre
Visiting Assistant Professor
740-587-6231
Service: 
2011-Present
Degree(s): 
B.F.A., Denison University; M.F.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Biography: 

Wendy Barrie-Wilson has performed in over 100 plays, and worked with dozen's of new writers helping develop their latest projects. Wendy was recently seen in I Capture the Castle (Mrs. Cotton) and The Grapes Of Wrath (Ma Joad) for the Shakespeare Theatre of NJ. She played Sister Aloysius in the European premiere of Doubt in Vienna. Wendy has received a SALT Award and a DayTony award for other productions of Doubt. Variety hailed her Amanda Wingfield in The Glass Menagerie as one of the best Amanda Wingfields ever. Wendy was last seen on Broadway in OUR TOWN starring Paul Newman; also on Broadway she performed in the Tony Award winning production of Arthur Miller's ALL MY SONS.

Wendy has performed in over 100 productions, including Yelena (opposite Hal Holbrook) in Uncle Vanya, Lady Croom in Arcadia, May in Fool For Love, Masha in Three Sisters, Andromache in The Greeks, Tourvel in Les Liaisons Dangereuses; Mags in Painting Churches, Maud/Lin in Cloud Nine, , Nadya Lenin in Travesties, Anna in Old Times, Mrs. Gibbs in Our Town, Sasha in Wild Honey, Olivia in Twelfth Night, Mariana in Measure for Measure, and several times in her two favorite's; Roxane in Rostand's Cyrano De Bergerac, and Stella in Tennessee William's A Streetcar Named Desire. Wendy has performed all over the country, at the Actor's Theatre of Louisville, Great Lakes Theatre Festival, Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Huntington Theatre, Asolo Theatre, Virginia Stage, Portland Stage, New Jersey Shakespeare Festival, River Arts Repertory, Indiana Repertory, Alliance Theatre, Playmaker's Repertory, and Denver Center Theatre Company, Princeton University Guest artist, among many others. She has worked with such wonderful writer's as J.P. Donleavy, Derek Walcott, Soviet writer Sasha Galin, The Red Clay Rambler's, Theresa Rebeck, and Arthur Miller.

Just before coming to Denison Wendy was playing Mrs. Chitwood on The Guiding Light. She can be seen on reruns of Law & Order/SVU and C.I. Recently she was on PBS in "Novel Reflections". Commercials: Wendy was for several years on Japanese TV as the Mom for General Foods “Blendy” Coffee. Others: for Adidas (Europe) starring Anna Kornikova; Wendy also won an Addy award for Z94's Morning Zoo for her voiceover work. Wendy coaches actors and has taught Master Acting classes and the "Business of the Biz", at Denison University, UNC-Chapel Hill; The ArtSchool, NC; Northeastern University, Baltimore's School for the Performing Arts, Denver Center Conservatory; Asolo Theatre; Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey; among others. Wendy's Great-Great Aunt Elizabeth Risdon and Uncle Brandon Evans were members of the Theatre Guild and worked with Lunt and Fontanne, Helen Hayes, J.B. Shaw, among many other famous actors/writers. Wendy is also a potter; she taught pottery in NYC for 5 years prior to coming to teach theatre at Denison. Her pottery studio in now in Ohio and she sells her pottery locally.

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Robin Bartlett Bartlett, Robin Bartlett

Bartlett, Robin Bartlett
Faculty  |  Queer Studies, Women’s Studies, Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Professor
Higley Hall
204
740-587-6574
Service: 
1973-Present
2012
Degree(s): 
B.A., Western College; M.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Intermediate Macroeconomics, Women in Labor Force, Forensic Economics, Introduction to Queer Studies

Research Interests: Executive Compensation, Earnings Differentials, Pedagogy, Clubs

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Jessica S. Bean dr. Bean, Jessica S. S. Bean

Jessica S. Bean
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Assistant Professor
Higley Hall
225
740-587-5617
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Middlebury College; M. Phil., Oxford University; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to Macroeconomics, Econometrics, Evolution of the Western Economy.

I have also taught courses in gender and economics, the evolution of social policy, and the Great Depression and 20th century economic history.

Research: 

My research is mainly focused on labor markets and female labor supply in early-twentieth-century Britain, with a particular interest in poverty and the household dynamics of labor supply. I have published one article exploring the origins and impact of early minimum-wage legislation in Britain, and another on the determinants of female labor supply in interwar London. My current works in progress include examinations of the work and wages of female home workers around the turn of the 20th century, household labor supply in interwar London, and the labor market impact of transportation and commuting patterns in 1930s London. Most recently, I have begun a new research project exploring female labor during and after the First World War in Britain.

Selected publications:

“The Trade Boards Act of 1909 and the Alleviation of Household Poverty” (with George Boyer), British Journal of Industrial Relations, vol. 47, 2 (June 2009).

“’To help keep the home going’: Female Labor Supply in Interwar London” forthcoming, Economic History Review (2014).

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Jerrell Beckham ’96 dr. Beckham, Jerrell Kevin Beckham ’96

Jerrell Beckham '96
Faculty  |  Black Studies, Education
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
107E
740-587-8543
Service: 
2006-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Denison University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
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Sohrab Behdad dr. Behdad, Sohrab Behdad

Dr.Behdad, Sohrab Behdad
Faculty  |  Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Economics
Professor
Higley Hall
206
740-587-6404
Service: 
1985-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to Microeconomics, Introduction to Microeconomics, History of Economic Thought, International Finance

Research Interests: International finance and trade, history of economic thought, Middle Eastern economies

Research: 

International finance and trade, history of economic thought, Middle Eastern economies

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David Bernstein Bernstein, David Bernstein

David Bernstein
Faculty  |  History, Environmental Studies
Visiting Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
409
740-587-8695
Service: 
2013-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Bowdoin College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
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Stafford Berry Berry, Stafford C. Berry

Berry, Stafford C. Berry
Faculty  |  Dance, Black Studies
Assistant Professor
Doane Dance Building
106
740-587-6564
Service: 
2010-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., North Carolina Central University; M.F.A., Choreography from Hollins University
Biography: 

STAFFORD C. BERRY, JR. is the Associate Artistic Director of the African American Dance Ensemble where he toured for 12 years, Managing Director of the Berry & Nance Dance Project, and is on the faculty of the American Dance Festival. He has taught, choreographed, and performed African rooted dance and theatre throughout the United States and the Caribbean. An advocate for the advancement of the arts, he has served on Dance Panels for the North Carolina Arts Council & the Durham Arts Council, and he's served on the Board of Directors for the North Carolina Dance Alliance. Mr. Berry has been a Master Teacher for the National Foundation for the Arts Competition in Miami, Florida. He has performed in works by (Dance) Melvin Purnell, Dennis Wayne, David Dorfman, Assane Konte, Dr. Kariamu Welsh Asante, Dr. Bill Banfield, Penny Bridgers, and Dr. Chuck Davis; (Theatre) Ed Shockley, Zadia Ife and August Wilson.

Originally from Chester, Pennsylvania, Mr. Berry received his formal education in theatre, dance, and music from Temple University & North Carolina Central University, and received his MFA from Hollins University/ADF. He is eternally grateful for the knowledge imparted to him from several masters in the US and in Africa, including Les Ballet Africaines, the National Dance Company of Guinea, West Africa. In 1996, Mr. Berry was certified as a teacher of the Umfundalai Technique and in 1997 was Assistant to the Choreographer for Kariamu & Company, with whom he'd also been a principal dancer for 5 years. In 1992 he co-founded the Seventh Principle Performance Company and in 1997 he co-founded the Berry and Nance Dance Project.

Mr. Berry's choreographer's awards and grants have been numerous. He was awarded the Neumann Cultural Enrichment Grant to create a new work (1994). He received a North Carolina Arts Council Choreographers Fellowship (2000), a Cooper Foundation Grant (2002), two Five County Arts Grants from the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance in PA (2003, 2004), a Ford Foundation Grant to create a new ballet in collaboration with Dr. Chuck Davis (2004) and most recently, an Emerging Artist grant from the Durham Arts Council which will allow him to create new music for a ballet (2008). His work, a combination of dance, theatre and music, can be seen in the archives of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

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Nida Bikmen dr. Bikmen, Nida Bikmen

Faculty  |  Psychology
Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
404F
740-587-8545
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., M.A., Bogazici University; Ph.D., Graduate Center, City University of New York
Biography: 

Dr. Bikmen graduated from Bogazici University, Turkey and earned her Ph.D. at City University of New York. She is a social/personality psychologist interested in studying issues of diversity and intergroup relations. Her research aims at identifying conditions that facilitate endorsement of diversity and multicultural groups and that prevent interpersonal and intergroup conflict. Specifically, she is interested in group identities and their consequences in terms of academic outcomes, representations of group history, intergroup attitudes, and collective action.

At Denison, Dr. Bikmen conducts research on attitudes toward immigration and multiculturalism, and on the process of social identity negotiation among minority students. Dr. Bikmen teaches courses in introductory psychology, social psychology, and the psychology of diversity.

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Don Bonar dr. Bonar, Daniel Bonar

Don Bonar
Faculty  |  Computer Science, Mathematics
Professor
F.W. Olin Science Hall
212
740-587-6407
1968
1969
Service: 
1965-1968, 1969-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S.Ch.E., M.S., West Virginia University; Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Don Bonar was born in Murraysville, WV (Jackson County) on July 7, 1938, the son of Nelson Edward Bonar II and Ada Polk Bonar. He graduated from Ravenswood High School and was awarded a four-year Board of Governors Scholarship to West Virginia University where he received the B.S. in Chemical Engineering in 1960. While at WVU, he was a member of the physics, chemistry, and chemical engineering honoraries, and served as President of Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honorary. Two National Science Foundation Fellowships supported his graduate work in mathematics. He received the M.S. from WVU in 1961 with a major in mathematics and a minor in physics and the Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1968. His Ph.D. work was in complex analysis. In 1965 Don joined the faculty of Denison University in Granville, OH where he has been teaching mathematics, statistics and computer science.

Awards received include the Richard King Mellon Foundation Award for excellence in teaching and scholarship in 1973 and the Sears-Roebuck Teaching Excellence and Community Leadership Award in 1991. In 1995 he was selected to fill the new fully endowed George R. Stibitz Distinguished Professorship in Mathematics and Computer Science. In 1999 Don was inducted into the Academy of Chemical Engineers at West Virginia University. He is the author of the book entitled On Annular Functions, a co-author of the book Real Infinite Series, and a co-author on several research papers. He has published joint work with the internationally acclaimed Hungarian mathematician Paul Erdos. Community service includes membership on the Granville Foundation, the Granville Development Commission, the Licking County (OH) Joint Vocational School Board (facility recently renamed C-TEC, Career and Technology Education Center of Licking County), and serving as President of the Granville Exempted Village School Board.

Don and his wife Martha Baker Bonar are the parents of Mary Martha, a resident in emergency medicine at the Penn State University Medical Centers in Hershey, PA. Forever Mountaineers, the Bonars enjoy time at their farm, family owned since 1869, in West Virginia.

Research: 

Publications

  • Real Infinite Series (with Michael J. Khoury '03) in Mathematical Association of America (MAA). 2006.
  • On Annular Functions Daniel D. Bonar, 1971.
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David Boyd dr. Boyd, David W. Boyd

Dr.Boyd, David W. Boyd
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
229
740-587-6317
Service: 
1991-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Intermediate Microeconomics, Industrial Organization, Mathematical Economics

Research: 

Research Interests: Applied Microeconomics

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Laura Boyd dr. Boyd, Laura A. Boyd

Dr.Boyd, Laura A. Boyd
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Associate Professor
Higley Hall
203
740-587-6316
Service: 
1991-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Carleton College; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to & Intermediate Microeconomics, Econometrics, Labor Economics, Applied Econometrics

Research Interests: Economics of education, earnings equations, economics of sports

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Brenda Boyle Boyle, Brenda Boyle

Brenda Boyle
Faculty  |  English, International Studies, Queer Studies, Writing Center
Associate Professor, English/Writing Center Director
Barney-Davis Hall
316
740-587-5770
Service: 
2003-Present
Degree(s): 
A.B., Davidson College; M.A., University of Southern California; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

As a member of the English faculty and Director of the Writing Center, Brenda Boyle is interested in American literature of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with a special focus on issues of rhetoric, race, gender, sexuality, and disability. Her research and publications extend from the study of American masculinity's formations in war, especially the Vietnam War, to representations of gender and sexuality through disability, to gender in The Gilmore Girls. She teaches classes in composition and rhetoric, British and American modernism, the contemporary novel, fiction and non-fiction war narratives, and academic writing.

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Michael C. Brady dr. Brady, Michael C. C. Brady

Michael C. Brady
Faculty  |  Political Science, Environmental Studies, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics, Lugar Program in Politics and Public Service
Assistant Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
305D
740-587-6502
Service: 
2009-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University
Biography: 

Michael joined the political science department at Denison in the fall of 2009.  His dissertation focuses on the role of parties and partisanship in conference committee negotiations between the House and Senate.  More broadly, his research and teaching centers around the study of political institutions, campaigns and elections, and political parties in the United States.  

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Tom Bressoud Bressoud, Thomas C. Bressoud

Tom Bressoud
Faculty  |  Computer Science, Mathematics
Associate Professor & Chair (Mathematics & Computer Science)
F.W. Olin Science Hall
211
740-587-5630
Service: 
2002-Present
Degree(s): 
B.S., Muskingum University; M.S. Boston University, M.S, Ph.D., Cornell University
Biography: 

Thomas Bressoud worked outside of academia both before and after receiving his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1996. Before his time in Ithaca, Dr. Bressoud spent 7 years working for MIT Lincoln Laboratory in real-time radar systems. After his Ph.D., Dr. Bressoud worked for a startup, Isis Distributed Systems, and, through the acquisition frenzy of the 90’s, was working for Lucent Technologies when he transferred to their research arm, Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, NJ.

In 2002, Dr. Bressoud joined the Denison faculty. He enjoys teaching courses across the undergraduate curriculum, from introductory courses exposing students from across campus to the fundamental ideas of computer science to upper level electives. In alignment with his research interests, he particularly enjoys teaching systems classes, like Networking and Operating Systems, and a special topics course in parallel programming and high performance systems.

Selected student research projects:

Research: 

My research interests are within the systems area of computer science and can be partitioned into the subareas of (i) fault-tolerance, (ii) networking and inter-domain routing, and (iii) high performance computing. Where possible, I enjoy the pursuit of research at the intersections of these areas. Within fault tolerance, I specialize in "minimally invasive" techniques of transforming non-fault-tolerant systems and protocols and legacy applications into fault-tolerant versions while minimizing impact on the application. In inter-domain routing I work in connection-oriented fault tolerant protocols and in load-balancing techniques for BGP, and in high performance computing, I study the performance of distributed (cluster) systems as we both scale and introduce failures into the system.

Selected publications:

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Cody Brooks dr. Brooks, D. Cody Brooks

Faculty  |  Psychology
Associate Professor
Blair Knapp Hall
410F
740-587-5683
Service: 
2000-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Gettysburg College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Vermont
Biography: 

Dr. Brooks came to Denison in 2000 and teaches courses in learning and conditioning, animal cognition, and related topics. His research interests focus on the basic learning and memory processes that influence treatment (e.g., of anxiety or substance abuse disorders) and the relapse of unwanted behaviors after treatment. He is interested in understanding those processes that can change behaviors motivated by emotions and/or biological need. He and his students have developed techniques for reducing and even eliminating some instances of relapse modeled in the laboratory. Some of Dr. Brooks' other interests include addiction, the history of psychology, and the role of diet and thought in mental health.

Research: 

Pavlovian Conditioning, Memory, Emotion, and Relapse

My research program involves basic research on the learning and memory processes that modulate emotionally- and motivationally- significant experiences, and the behaviors that accompany those experiences.  I am especially interested in the use of animal models to better understand the learning and memory processes that underlie instances of human relapse of problematic behaviors with emotional components (e.g., substance abuse, anxiety, depression).  Believe it or not, the methods of Pavlovian conditioning are uniquely suited to the study of these and any emotion-based behaviors.

Since Ivan P. Pavlov's time in Russia (circa 1890-1925), psychologists and other scientists have come to realize the fundamental importance of Pavlovian (classical) conditioning for the development of and change in many involuntary ("non-conscious" and other) responses experienced by humans and other animals.  These responses are the result of Pavlovian conditioning, and include heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory, and perspiration changes; emotional reactions like anxiety, fear, excitement, frustration; drug tolerance, withdrawal and craving; and motivational influences on many voluntary behaviors such as feeding, competition, reproduction, and pleasure-seeking activities, to name just a few.

An increasingly popular idea about Pavlovian conditioning is that it results in the formation of memories involving the events that are present in an organism's environment when they have emotionally-significant experiences.  My research focuses on what the content of those memories is, and what happens to those memories (e.g., how memorable they become) usually at some time after they have formed.  Sometimes various different memories can interact, and in some cases, the memory of a particular experience can be retrieved more or less well compared to other memories. This disparity in the ability to retrieve certain memories can produce dramatic changes in behavior.

My research is directed at three interrelated fronts:

  1. The study of animal models of relapse in humans.  One of the more interesting implications of our research here is that clinical relapses (of substance abuse, anxiety-disorders, depression, and so on) occur in part because crucial information learned during the treatment of a disorder is forgotten rather readily after the formal course of treatment ends (i.e., relapse is likely when a period of time has passed, or the setting changes, following treatment).  Using a model involving rats as subjects, my research has shown that laboratory instances of relapse can be reduced or eliminated by straightforward memory retrieval techniques.  (The implications of this research for human treatment are rather important.  Psychology has developed fairly good technologies for the treatment of common psychological disorders like anxiety and depression, but unfortunately, relapse rates post-treatment are disturbingly high.  More information is needed about why relapses occur, and how they can be minimized or completely prevented.) My students and I have found that the memory processes that underlie relapse and its reduction are similar in both aversive and appetitive motivational systems, i.e., when animals form initial memories about either "positive" or "negative" experiences.  One objective of our research is to continue to study the basic memory mechanisms that contribute to various types of relapse, and those that may contribute to reducing relapses.
  2. Our research has implications for a basic understanding of conditioning and memory involving important emotional events.  Some contemporary theories of conditioning and memory can explain the instances of relapse and their reduction that we have been studying intensively (e.g., hierarchical associative learning theories about occasion setting and contextual control).  Other theories cannot.  The theories that suggest explanations are relatively straightforward neural network models that can simulate many conditioning effects.  My students and I conduct ongoing tests of these theories using experimental designs that we hope will advance our understanding of not only the clinically-relevant relapse phenomena, but of the general memory processes involved in motivation & emotions.
  3. Recently, I have begun a project to study alcohol tolerance, withdrawal, and relapse, with the intention of influencing the probability or magnitude of craving-related responses and relapses that motivate an individual to resume alcohol use/abuse.  I believe this work has direct relevance to human substance abuse patterns.  There is always interest in determining whether learning and memory processes shown with nonhuman animals also apply to human experience, behavior, and memory.  I am beginning to investigate drug-use related relapse-like effects in human memory, with particular interest in discovering whether relapses might be reduced by reminder treatments analogous to those I've established with other methods.

I would be happy to talk with students about any aspect of these intriguing and challenging areas of research, and related topics.  Please contact me for questions or comments about my research program.

Publications

  • Brooks, D. C., Karamanlian, B. R., & Foster, V.. 2001. Extinction and spontaneous recovery of conditioned ethanol tolerance. Psychopharmacology. v. 153 p. 491-496
  • Brooks, D. C.. 2000. Recent and remote extinction cues reduce spontaneous recovery.. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. v. 53B( p. 25-58
  • Brooks, D. C., Palmatier, M. I., Garcia, E. O., & Johnson, J. L.. 1999. A retrieval cue for extinction reduces spontaneous recovery of a conditioned taste aversion. Animal Learning & Behavior. v. 27 p. 77-88
  • Wilson, A., Brooks, D. C., & Bouton, M. E.. 1995. The role of the rat hippocampal system in several effects of context in extinction. Behavioral Neuroscience. v. 109( p. 828-836.
  • Brooks, D. C., Hale, B., Nelson, J. B., & Bouton, M. E.. 1995. Reinstatement after counterconditioning. Animal Learning & Behavior. v. 23(4 p. 383-390
  • Brooks, D. C. & Bouton, M. E.. 1994. A retrieval cue for extinction attenuates response recovery (renewal) caused by a return to the conditioning context. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes. no. 20 p. 366-379
  • Bouton, M. E. & Brooks, D. C.. 1993. Time and context effects in a Pavlovian discrimination reversal. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes. v. 19 p. 165-179
  • Brooks, D. C. & Bouton, M. E.. 1993. A retrieval cue for extinction attenuates spontaneous recovery. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes. v. 19 p. 77-89
  • Brooks, D. C., & Bowker, J. L.. Further Evidence that Conditioned Inhibition is Not the Mechanism of an Extinction Cueâs Effect: A Reinforced Cue Prevents Spontaneous Recovery.. Animal Learning & Behavior.
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Sylvia Brown dr. Brown, Sylvia Anne Brown

Dr.Brown, Sylvia Anne Brown
Faculty  |  English
Assistant Professor
Barney-Davis Hall
301
740-587-5792
Service: 
1998-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Samford University; M.A., Ph.D., Emory University
Biography: 

Sylvia A.Brown earned her Ph.D. from Emory University, having specialized in Restoration and 18th-Century British Literature. She teaches and writes about 18th- and 19th-Century Literature, her specific interests including the origins of the novel, criminal narrative, Jane Austen, Disability Studies, and science fiction. She is currently working on a project exploring epistemology, the emergence of realist narrative, and conjuring in 18th- and 19th-century texts. Her recent essay, “Scripting Wholeness in Lucy Grealy's Autobiography of a Face,” appeared in the spring of 2008 in Criticism (Vol. 48).

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Christopher Bruhn dr. Bruhn, Christopher E. Bruhn

Christopher Bruhn
Faculty  |  Music, Queer Studies  |  Music History
Assistant Professor, Music History Coordinator
Burton Hall
108
740-587-8509
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison; M.A., Hunter College, CUNY; Ph.D., CUNY
Biography: 

Christopher Bruhn is Assistant Professor of Music History at Denison University. He holds the PhD in musicology from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where he also received a certificate in American Studies. He has a Master of Arts degree in piano performance from Hunter College, CUNY, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in English literature from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Bruhn’s current research interests include 20th-century music in the United States and the intersections between music, literature, and philosophy, with particular focus on the music of Charles Ives and the philosophy of William James. In addition to music history survey courses, Dr. Bruhn teaches Music and Spirituality, Music and Sexuality, Globalization and Music, and The Aesthetics of Silence. Dr. Bruhn is also beginning research into aspects of musical life in Mexico.

Research: 

Publications include:

  • “The Transitive Multiverse of Charles Ives’s ‘Concord’ Sonata.” The Journal of Musicology 28, no. 2 (2011): 166-94.
  • “Signifyin(g) on the South: Interpreting Creamer and Layton’s ‘Dear Old Southland.’” In Music, American Made: Essays in Honor of John Graziano, ed. by John Koegel, 581-602. Detroit Monographs in Musicology/Studies in Music, no. 58. Sterling Heights, MI:  Harmonie Park Press, 2011.
  • “Between the Old World and the New: William Steinway and the New York Liederkranz.”  In European Music and Musicians in New York City, 1840-90, ed. by John Graziano, 135-48. Eastman Studies in Music. Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2006.
  • “Taking the Private Public: Amateur Music Making and the Musical Audience in 1860s New York.” American Music 21, no. 3 (2003): 260-290.
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Mark Evans Bryan ’96 dr. Bryan, Mark Evans Evans Bryan ’96

Mark Evans Bryan '96
Faculty  |  Theatre
Associate Professor
Theatre Arts Building - Ace Morgan Theatre
6
740-587-6260
Service: 
2002-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Denison University; A.M., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Mark Evans Bryan is a playwright and historian of theatre and culture in the U.S. eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. His scholarly work includes “‘Slideing into Monarchical extravagance’: Cato at Valley Forge and the Testimony of William Bradford, Jr.,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Series, 67.1; “A Femme Fatale of Eighteenth-Century American Theatre Research: Reading William Bradford’s Cato Letter,” Performing Arts Resources 28; “‘Crusade of Conquest’: Orientalist Surrogations in Manifest-Destinarian Theatre,” Journal of American Drama and Theatre 21.1; “The Rhetoric of Race and Slavery in an American Patriot Drama, John Leacock’s The Fall of British Tyranny,” JADT 12.3; “Yeoman and Barbarians: Popular Outland Caricature and American Identity,” Journal of Popular Culture 46.3; “Performing ‘Amerikee’: Rural Caricature and the George Washingtons of Percy MacKaye and Jacques Copeau,” “To Have and Have Not”: New Essays on Commerce and Capital in Modernist Theatre (McFarland 2011); and “American Drama, 1900-1915,” Companion to Twentieth-Century American Drama (Blackwell 2005).  “Middle True,” the first part of Dr. Bryan’s play cycle, Mercury Seven with Signs Following, was published in the Kenyon Review 26.1; the cycle has been performed in the U.S., Europe, and Asia.  His recent work includes a new stand-alone adaptation of the second part of the M7 cycle, Mud Nostalgia, which premiered at the Prague Fringe Festival in Prague, Czech Republic, in May 2011, under the direction of Bruce Hermann and performed by Sue Ott Rowlands (and subsequently toured Hungary and was performed in Sri Lanka and the U.S.) and his one-woman play, fig. 1, which premiered at the 2010 Prague Fringe Festival with designs by the celebrated Czech “action designer” and artist, Jaroslav Malina.  The Prague Post called fig. 1 “a play of romance and resignation, disillusionment and infatuation … intimate, gutsy, and ornately detailed”; Radmila Hrdinová was “enchanted” by the play, awarding it a rating of 9/10 in Právo.  As an actor, Dr. Bryan is most proud of his work with his long-time collaborator, filmmaker Andrew M. Hulse, including his performance in Hulse’s awarding-winning short film, Gasoline (2008).  Dr. Bryan is currently at work on a book project—on the Bradford family of eighteenth-century Philadelphia and popular culture in the U.S. middle colonies between 1755 and 1795—as well as on a new play, The Remotest Indies of This Living Earth, a not-especially-narrative piece set in mid-century Mexico City, Nixon-era southern Illinois, and in the present at the edge of the solar system.  He is also very proud to serve on the board of the for/word company. 

At Denison, Dr. Bryan teaches FYS 102 (“Humbug! Nineteenth-Century American Popular Entertainment”); THTR 100 (“Introduction to Theatre Studies”); THTR 170 (performance practicum); THTR 290 & 430 (playwriting); THTR 371-372-373-374 (the sequence in the history, literature, and theory of the theatre); and multiple versions of THTR 400 (junior/senior seminars on dramatic literature, theory of the theatre, and the history of theatre and culture), including “Theatre and the Early Republic, 1760-1860,” “Representing the Muslim World in British and American Drama,” “Modernism, Modernity, Theatre,” and seminars on vaudeville, minstrelsy, and popular theatre in the United States before the mid-twentieth century. Dr. Bryan is both an alumnus company member and the faculty advisor of Denison’s Burpee’s Seedy Theatrical Company, an improvisational performance group founded in 1979, purportedly the oldest of its kind on American university campuses; B.S.T.C. counts among its alumnae/i numerous theatre, television and film artists, including Steve Carell.

Dr. Bryan earned his Ph.D. in Theatre (history, literature and criticism) at the Ohio State University; his A.M. from the University of Chicago (the interdisciplinary Master of Arts Program in the Humanities); and his B.A. from Denison.

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Sally Bulford Bulford, Sally F. Bulford

Faculty  |  English, Environmental Studies, First-Year Program
Visiting Instructor
Barney-Davis Hall
319
740-587-5797
Service: 
2007-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Wittenberg University; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University
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Ted A. Burczak dr. Burczak, Theodore A. A. Burczak

Ted A. Burczak
Faculty  |  Economics, Philosophy, Politics, & Economics
Professor
Higley Hall
207
740-587-6747
1997
1998
Service: 
1995-1997, 1998-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., SUNY at Binghamton; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Biography: 

Courses normally taught: Introduction to Macroeconomics, Economic Justice, Intermediate Macroeconomics, Monetary Theory, History of Economic Thought II

Curriculum Vitae: 
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Brett Burleson Burleson, Brett John Burleson

Brett Burleson
Faculty  |  Music  |  Jazz - Guitar
Studio Instructor (part-time)
Mulberry House
204
740-587-5656
Degree(s): 
B.M., Capital University
Biography: 

Guitarist Brett Burleson has performed and recorded in a diverse array of musical circumstances. He has played with jazz groups that range from big band to bebop to avant-garde free improvisation as well as rock, pop and blues bands. Standout performance experiences include over a dozen shows in 2008 and 2009 with Grammy nominated singer/songwriter Michelle Shocked and nightly performances for 6 months with an R&B group in Tenerife, Spain in 1999. He has performed in jazz clubs and festivals throughout the United States and continues to be an active member of the Central Ohio music community. 

As an educator, Mr. Burleson is on the faculties of Capital University Conservatory of Music (since 2002), Ohio Wesleyan University (since 2003), Denison University (since 2009) and The Ohio State University (since 2009).  He was also on faculty at Kenyon College from 2002-2008 where he taught guitar as well as directed the Kenyon College Jazz Ensemble. At Capital University he has directed the Fusion Band, Classical Guitar Ensemble and Guitar Workshop.

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Jason Busic Busic, Jason Busic

Busic, Jason Busic
Faculty  |  Modern Languages, Spanish
Assistant Professor
Fellows Hall
301N
740-587-6464
Service: 
2012-Present
Degree(s): 
M.A., Ohio University; Ph.D., Ohio State University
Biography: 

Jason Busic studies medieval and early modern Iberia with a focus on cultural studies. His principal area of investigation focuses on intellectual and ideological engagement between Christians and Muslims. Professor Busic especially enjoys exploring themes of identity and culture in class with his students and the connections between the pre-modern and contemporary worlds.

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Dave Bussan ’81 Bussan, David Robert Bussan ’81

Faculty  |  Cinema
Associate Professor
Cinema House
107
740-587-6234
Service: 
1987-Present
Degree(s): 
B.A., Denison University; M.F.A., California Institute of the Arts
Biography: 

David Bussan, Associate Professor of Cinema, began teaching at the college in 1987 and served as Chair of the department from 1998 to 2011. He teaches a range of production courses in 16mm film and digital video. He holds a Master of Fine Arts in Film/Video from the California Institute of the Arts and a Bachelor of Arts in Cinema from Denison University.

Professor Bussan's portfolio of creative film includes works in documentary, memoir, narrative, and experimental films. He recently completed a short documentary entitled Future Visions of Over the Rhine, which explores the economic revival and gentrification of this poverty-stricken downtown Cincinnati neighborhood. His current work-in-progress is Art Bomb!, a documentary concerning Ohio artist Charles Van Ness and his uniquely stylized sculptures.

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